A dog & canine forum. DogBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » DogBanter forum » Dog forums » Dog health
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Concern about 'Performatrin' dog food



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old March 27th 11, 05:14 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
cshenk
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,048
Default Concern about 'Performatrin' dog food

"cshenk" wrote
"Jo Wolf" wrote


My current 15 yo now has a "high normal" on BUN and creatinine, and the
vet said to make no changes in his diet.... 34% Pro. He's healthy, very
active, and has excellent muscle mass for age. Goes up stairs a lot
faster than I do.... A "little deaf".... not unusual.


Grin, Mabel gets total 'high=good' on this one. It's one of several
reasons why we elected to have her dental work done. It looks like just
maybe, this elderly lady if well cared for now, may have several years in
her yet if they've nipped what may have been cancer.


Aunti Mabel Anne has fully recovered and is back on her normal ground RMB
with treats. She'd started trying to sneak Cash's bone into her room for
the night so she has one of her own size in there now.

Being smaller and much smaller jawed, the big ones he gets she can just nose
into her area and he tends to pick them up and walk back with them (grin).
She instead gets the meaty rib bones which she can carry and hold easier in
her paws as she knarfs them.

She's obviously feeling better. Spent most of the morning grabbing Cash
toys and dropping them on him then playing tug-o-war. Her favorite is a
rope with 2 knots and she will trail it before him until he grabs the other
end and starts a mock-war.

Hush your giggling now. It's nap-time!


  #12  
Old March 28th 11, 03:24 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
Bill Bell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Concern about 'Performatrin' dog food

On Feb 18, 5:00*pm, Bill Bell wrote:
My dog just got over a few weeks of kidney trouble. ...


My apologies for being so long in responding! Thanks to everyone who
offered advice, or at least read my request for help. I would like to
report what happened.

We talked to various knowledgeable people about our problem, as well
as yourselves. Finally someone (can't remember who) suggested Royal
Canin MediCal food based on duck. Within days, my dog's unquenchable
thirst disappeared, as did his frequent need to urinate, and his
urine's specific gravity popped back up to normal. We had to
administer antibiotics to clear some bacteria from his urine for a few
weeks but he's ok now.

Anyway, thought you might like to know what happened in this case.

Thanks you very much for your help.

  #13  
Old March 28th 11, 10:51 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
Jo Wolf
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 479
Default Concern about 'Performatrin' dog food

Thanks for that follow-up!!!!!!!!!!! And glad to see that your dog is
now doing well.

Jo Wolf
Martinez, Georgia

  #14  
Old March 29th 11, 03:54 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
Steve Crane
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Concern about 'Performatrin' dog food

Hello Buglady,
I am now an old and retired person - which I truly love. My
original comment was been pretty clear, protein is not the culprit,
never has been - but divorcing the phosphorus that naturally comes in
with nearly all proteins is just about impossible. High protein foods
will almost always contain much higher levels of phos. You simply
can't get down to the level of phosphorus well documented and proven
to be effective, without reducing the protein as well.
We can always point to examples that are contrary to what the
evidence is. My great grandmother smoked until she died at 93 - that
doesn't mean it's appropriate for everyone to smoke. I'm glad your cat
made it to that age on high protein foods - but that's an "n" of 1 -
like my 93 year old grandmother. The published studies and evidence
are overwhelmingly in favor of reduced levels of phos, and increased
levels of Omega 3 fatty acids for animals with renal failure.


On Mar 7, 10:17*pm, "buglady" wrote:
Good gravy Steve, most of your old posts are gone, thought you'd erased
yourself!

..............And once again for the nineteenth billion time, the words high
protein don't necessarily come into it.
Restrict phosphorus, yes, restrict protein no.

Let's all bow to Evidence Based Medicine!
My moderate renal failure cat made it to 20.5 years w/o restriction of
protein.

buglady
take out the dog before replying

"Steve Crane" wrote in message

...



There are three Grade 1 Evidence Based Medicine published studies that
unequivocally prove that restricting phosphorus, restricting protein
(the source of the vast majority of dietary phosphorus) and increasing
Omega 3 fatty acids which protect renal tubules is hugely beneficial
to dogs and cat which have renal failure.

  #15  
Old March 29th 11, 04:00 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
Steve Crane
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Concern about 'Performatrin' dog food

Actually Purina has done some good work on a number of different
areas. Interestingly - their renal diet for dogs contains slightly
less protein - and about the same amount of phosphorus as k/d. While
the protein leve in NF is set about half a percent higher, the
digestibility is quite a bit lower, thus to total protein available is
slightly less than k/d. Purina obviously believes low protein and the
low phos that comes with it are correct for renal failure dogs.


On Mar 8, 5:22*pm, (Jo Wolf) wrote:
Well, if Steve is still at Hill's, he wouldn't believe what I wrote
because the research was done by Purina...... *{chuckle} *I'd forgotten
that's where he worked when I used to come in here before.

Jo Wolf
Martinez, Georgia


  #16  
Old March 29th 11, 06:40 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
buglady
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 863
Default Concern about 'Performatrin' dog food


"Steve Crane" wrote in message
...
Hello Buglady,
I am now an old and retired person - which I truly love.

..........Well good! Hope you enjoy yourself. Too many don't know how to
after they retire.

.. I'm glad your cat
made it to that age on high protein foods - but that's an "n" of 1 -


.............Most people only care about the "n"s in their household!

buglady
take out the dog before replying


  #17  
Old March 30th 11, 11:25 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
buglady
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 863
Default Concern about 'Performatrin' dog food


"Bill Bell" wrote in message
...
Finally someone (can't remember who) suggested Royal
Canin MediCal food based on duck. Within days, my dog's unquenchable thirst
disappeared, as did his frequent need to urinate, and his urine's specific
gravity popped back up to normal. We had to
administer antibiotics to clear some bacteria from his urine for a few weeks
but he's ok now.

..............Thanks for posting back - glad to hear your pup is doing well.
I'll just say, though, that you may not want to stay on a prescription diet
forever, especially if it's some kind of renal diet. There may be no need.
I couldn't find any kind of Medi-cal food with duck except the
hypoallergenic. Is this what your pup is on?

buglady
take out the dog before replying


  #18  
Old March 31st 11, 05:57 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
Bill Bell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Concern about 'Performatrin' dog food

On Mar 30, 6:25*pm, "buglady" wrote:

I'll just say, though, that you may not want to stay on a prescription diet
forever, especially if it's some kind of renal diet. *There may be no need.
I couldn't find any kind of Medi-cal food with duck except the
hypoallergenic. *Is this what your pup is on?


Yes, that's right. Forgot to mention that. It might be important too.
We give him biweekly injections that have been formulated by a
specialist against various allergens.

Bill
  #19  
Old March 31st 11, 11:58 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
buglady
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 863
Default Concern about 'Performatrin' dog food


"Bill Bell" wrote in message
...
On Mar 30, 6:25 pm, "buglady" wrote:

I'll just say, though, that you may not want to stay on a prescription
diet
forever, especially if it's some kind of renal diet. There may be no need.
I couldn't find any kind of Medi-cal food with duck except the
hypoallergenic. Is this what your pup is on?


Yes, that's right. Forgot to mention that. It might be important too.
We give him biweekly injections that have been formulated by a
specialist against various allergens.

.............Ah, OK!

buglady
take out the dog before replying



  #20  
Old November 4th 17, 02:23 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Concern about 'Performatrin' dog food

Hi. I had West Highland White Terrier on Medi-cal (various) her whole short life. Bless her, she was hit by a truck at age 7, but she thrived on that product line.

I adopted 2 surrendered Westies, half-sisters (& unbelievably half sisters of my Betty), one of which has TERRIBLE skin allergies - partly why they were surrendered. 'WESTIES IN NEED' got the weeping sores under control & sent them to me with a dry kibble called PULSAR. It's made in Saskatchewan and contains fish & 'pulses', i dunno, something to do with beansprouts and lentilsprouts, and vitamins. That's it. It does NOT smell fishy. It is not more expensive than other quality foods. Problem, if it is one, is that you can only buy it at Global Petfood & not all of them carry it, but if you buy it regularly, they'll get it in. She still has summer allergies but has never had the yeast, sores, etc. I DO wash her every week with special shampoo.

raw meat. I contacted the Veterinary College at the University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada to ask them about that. Their response was that if my animals ever needed their services (& MaggIe has broken and cracked teeth), they WOULD NOT be able to let them in because of the bacteria they're subjected to from raw meat (it could potentially contaminate sensItive areas/animals/people at the University). My opinion is, if it's not okay for the University of Guelph, School of Veterinary Medicine, it's good enough for me. Furthermore, two vets told me that Maggie's dental issues may stem from chewing hard bones.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Canine Health Concern chardonnay9 Dog health 45 May 26th 09 03:39 AM
Small limp in puppy ... is this a concern? Ian P Dog health 2 February 11th 07 02:01 AM
Performatrin Ultra kayla Dog health 2 April 4th 06 04:54 PM
Sheltie Concern??? Gregg Dog behavior 5 March 26th 06 02:12 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.2.0 (Unregistered)
Copyright 2004-2019 DogBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.