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prevent dog bites



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 18th 19, 10:21 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.behavior
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Default prevent dog bites

Read this article about dog bites: https://charlottedogclub.com/blogs/t...og-you-deserve and you will also find ways to prevent these bites. Ways like:
1. Socialize your dog ever since it is just a puppy
2. Avoid rough games and teach your dog to “let go”
3. Work on developing a submissive behavior
4. Teach your dog to walk on a leash and use this accessory in unknown places and situations
and more.
  #2  
Old January 18th 19, 05:33 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.behavior
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Posts: 2
Default prevent dog bites

On Fri, 18 Jan 2019 01:21:21 -0800, washingtonkate88 wrote:

Read this article about dog bites:
https://charlottedogclub.com/blogs/t...tes-and-enjoy-

the-well-behaved-dog-you-deserve
and you will also find ways to prevent these bites. Ways like:
1. Socialize your dog ever since it is just a puppy 2. Avoid
rough games and teach your dog to “let go”
3. Work on developing a submissive behavior 4. Teach your dog
to walk on a leash and use this accessory in unknown places and
situations and more.


search for book:

Control Unleashed,Puppy program by Leslie McDevitt

read and implement
  #3  
Old January 21st 19, 04:11 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.behavior
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Posts: 1,052
Default prevent dog bites

student wrote:

On Fri, 18 Jan 2019 01:21:21 -0800, washingtonkate88 wrote:

Read this article about dog bites:

https://charlottedogclub.com/blogs/t...tes-and-enjoy-
the-well-behaved-dog-you-deserve
and you will also find ways to prevent these bites. Ways like:
1. Socialize your dog ever since it is just a puppy 2.
Avoid rough games and teach your dog to “let go”
3. Work on developing a submissive behavior 4. Teach your
dog to walk on a leash and use this accessory in unknown places and
situations and more.


search for book:

Control Unleashed,Puppy program by Leslie McDevitt

read and implement


It's probably also important to be careful in selection of dog type.
Some require more experience to train well.

Example: I am not up to a rottie. Nothing wrong in admitting that.
I've become quite good with Beagles (which are generlly pretty easy
anyways). The hardest spot with beagles is teaching appropriate
barking and even that isn't very hard if you are consistant and start
early.
  #4  
Old January 21st 19, 05:02 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.behavior
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Posts: 2
Default prevent dog bites

On Mon, 21 Jan 2019 09:11:35 -0600, cshenk wrote:

student wrote:

On Fri, 18 Jan 2019 01:21:21 -0800, washingtonkate88 wrote:

Read this article about dog bites:

https://charlottedogclub.com/blogs/t...tes-and-enjoy-
the-well-behaved-dog-you-deserve
and you will also find ways to prevent these bites. Ways like:
1. Socialize your dog ever since it is just a puppy 2.
Avoid rough games and teach your dog to “let go”
3. Work on developing a submissive behavior 4. Teach your
dog to walk on a leash and use this accessory in unknown places and
situations and more.


search for book:

Control Unleashed,Puppy program by Leslie McDevitt

read and implement


It's probably also important to be careful in selection of dog type.
Some require more experience to train well.

I think it is more about understanding the breed of dog,
for what purpose it was developed.
When someone chooses a mix breed from a shelter usually very little is
known so difficulty with training follow.


Example: I am not up to a rottie. Nothing wrong in admitting that. I've
become quite good with Beagles (which are generlly pretty easy anyways).
The hardest spot with beagles is teaching appropriate barking and even
that isn't very hard if you are consistant and start early.


Every dog treated with kindness will do good.

  #5  
Old January 22nd 19, 02:41 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.behavior
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,052
Default prevent dog bites

student wrote:

On Mon, 21 Jan 2019 09:11:35 -0600, cshenk wrote:

student wrote:

On Fri, 18 Jan 2019 01:21:21 -0800, washingtonkate88 wrote:

Read this article about dog bites:


https://charlottedogclub.com/blogs/t...tes-and-enjoy-
the-well-behaved-dog-you-deserve
and you will also find ways to prevent these bites. Ways like:
1. Socialize your dog ever since it is just a puppy 2.
Avoid rough games and teach your dog to “let go”
3. Work on developing a submissive behavior 4. Teach

your dog to walk on a leash and use this accessory in unknown
places and situations and more.

search for book:

Control Unleashed,Puppy program by Leslie McDevitt

read and implement


It's probably also important to be careful in selection of dog type.
Some require more experience to train well.

I think it is more about understanding the breed of dog,
for what purpose it was developed.


Agreed for the most part. Some were bred to be highly protective as a
sample. Others are high strung hunters.


When someone chooses a mix breed from a shelter usually very little
is known so difficulty with training follow.


Sometimes they are not as mixed so general behavior will come through.
My mixed rescue 'Cash' (good ol Johnny Cash type of dog') is a beagle
mix. Honestly, he looks like the other half was a rather desperate
Bull Mastiff (but I'm sure it was something else, just funny as he
looks like that happened). Neck down he's a scaled down short legged
Bull Mastiff. Head up he's a beagle with HUGE jaws and a very broad
head. Tan and white classic beagle colors. Beagle minded. Slightly
underweight at 52lbs.



Example: I am not up to a rottie. Nothing wrong in admitting that.
I've become quite good with Beagles (which are generlly pretty easy
anyways). The hardest spot with beagles is teaching appropriate
barking and even that isn't very hard if you are consistant and
start early.


Every dog treated with kindness will do good.


Yes.

  #6  
Old January 22nd 19, 04:20 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.behavior
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default prevent dog bites

On Mon, 21 Jan 2019 19:41:27 -0600, cshenk wrote:

student wrote:

On Mon, 21 Jan 2019 09:11:35 -0600, cshenk wrote:

student wrote:

On Fri, 18 Jan 2019 01:21:21 -0800, washingtonkate88 wrote:

Read this article about dog bites:


https://charlottedogclub.com/blogs/t...tes-and-enjoy-
the-well-behaved-dog-you-deserve
and you will also find ways to prevent these bites. Ways like:
1. Socialize your dog ever since it is just a puppy 2. Avoid
rough games and teach your dog to “let go”
3. Work on developing a submissive behavior 4. Teach

your dog to walk on a leash and use this accessory in unknown
places and situations and more.

search for book:

Control Unleashed,Puppy program by Leslie McDevitt

read and implement

It's probably also important to be careful in selection of dog type.
Some require more experience to train well.

I think it is more about understanding the breed of dog,
for what purpose it was developed.


Agreed for the most part. Some were bred to be highly protective as a
sample. Others are high strung hunters.


When someone chooses a mix breed from a shelter usually very little is
known so difficulty with training follow.


Sometimes they are not as mixed so general behavior will come through.
My mixed rescue 'Cash' (good ol Johnny Cash type of dog') is a beagle
mix. Honestly, he looks like the other half was a rather desperate Bull
Mastiff (but I'm sure it was something else, just funny as he looks like
that happened). Neck down he's a scaled down short legged Bull Mastiff.
Head up he's a beagle with HUGE jaws and a very broad head. Tan and
white classic beagle colors. Beagle minded. Slightly underweight at
52lbs.



Example: I am not up to a rottie. Nothing wrong in admitting that.
I've become quite good with Beagles (which are generlly pretty easy
anyways). The hardest spot with beagles is teaching appropriate
barking and even that isn't very hard if you are consistant and start
early.


Every dog treated with kindness will do good.


Yes.


https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...nside-of-a-dog (book by
Horowitz)

another great author on dogs is Pat Miller
 




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