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Great Pyrenees Growth Period



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 4th 03, 06:23 PM
Rick Watson
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Default Great Pyrenees Growth Period

We have a 7 month old Great Pyrenees puppy who weights 70 pounds.
Currently he is 25 inches at the shoulder.

Obviously we know we have a big dog - indeed this is what we wanted
What I want to know is when are Great Pyrs generally finished growing?

We want him to be taller - is there hope ?

We love our Pyr and and call him "runt" g

He's the sweetest puppy.

Any advice from Great Pyr owners about how many months old they stop
growing?

Thanks,
- Rick
  #2  
Old July 4th 03, 08:44 PM
Elizabeth DeLeo
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"Rick Watson" wrote in message
om...
We have a 7 month old Great Pyrenees puppy who weights 70 pounds.
Currently he is 25 inches at the shoulder.

Obviously we know we have a big dog - indeed this is what we wanted
What I want to know is when are Great Pyrs generally finished growing?

We want him to be taller - is there hope ?

We love our Pyr and and call him "runt" g

He's the sweetest puppy.

Any advice from Great Pyr owners about how many months old they stop
growing?

Thanks,
- Rick


Rick
I envy you your Pyr. I always wanted one.
Your Pyr will grow much as his parents. If they were on the large side he
will be also most probably. If they were smallish, then he might also be.
Sometimes there are surprises but he probably going to be something like
them in size etc.
Whatever you do, don't try to encourage growth by extra vitamins and Large
breed dog food etc. He will grow at his own rate.
Large breeds of which he is one, tend to finish their height somewhere
between 10-14 mos old and then spend the next year filling out and maturing.
Your breeder should be helping you with all this however.
I hope you join Pyr clubs, mailing lists and forums on the net too. It's a
good place to meet and link up with other Pyr owners who will have lots of
answers if your breeder is for some reason not helping you.
Lizzie (Still trying to encourage her daughter to get a Pyr)


  #3  
Old July 5th 03, 04:19 AM
rhurlbert
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"Rick Watson" wrote in message
om...
We have a 7 month old Great Pyrenees puppy who weights 70 pounds.
Currently he is 25 inches at the shoulder.

Obviously we know we have a big dog - indeed this is what we wanted
What I want to know is when are Great Pyrs generally finished growing?

We want him to be taller - is there hope ?

We love our Pyr and and call him "runt" g

He's the sweetest puppy.

Any advice from Great Pyr owners about how many months old they stop
growing?

Thanks,
- Rick


I have 2 Pyrs, a male & a female. He may get a little taller, but he should
put on a lot more muscle. Large breed dogs take 2 years to attain full
size. Large dogs should be fed quality Large Breed dog food. It is designed
to let the dog reach its full potential. Read the label on the package. My
male is about 175 lbs.


  #4  
Old July 5th 03, 07:10 AM
Elizabeth DeLeo
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"rhurlbert" wrote in message
news:[email protected]


I have 2 Pyrs, a male & a female. He may get a little taller, but he

should
put on a lot more muscle. Large breed dogs take 2 years to attain full
size. Large dogs should be fed quality Large Breed dog food. It is

designed
to let the dog reach its full potential. Read the label on the package.

My
male is about 175 lbs.


It is generally thought that feeding Large Breed dog food is not necessarily
a good idea. It basicly encourages quick early growth which is "not" desired
in large breeds.
A good food for a large or giant breed should contain optimum levels of
usable nutrients. ie. about 23% proteins and 12% fats. This allows puppies
to develop "slowly" which is desirable for obtaining even long-bone growth
patterns without compromising immune systems.
There are some well recommended foods for large and giant breeds.
Here are a few very good ones...
Eagle Natural Formula (they did the most extensive large and giant breed
feeding trials before marketing.)
Have a look at this page at her website for her own feeding programme. She's
a well known expert on dog food and feeding and has Great Danes, but the
same info she gives applies to any large or giant breed.
http://www.doglogic.com/lgpupdiet.htm
There's a great deal of very useful info on all other pages of her website.
Hope this helps Rick make a wise choice.
Lizzie

(Taken from Linda Arndt's web page on the best premium dog foods)
Eagle Dog Food 1-800-255-5959
Precise 1-800-446-7148
PHD (Perfect Health Diet) 1-800-320-7062
Back to Basics 1-800-219-2558
Pinnacle 1 - 800-255-4286
Canidae -1-800-398-1600
Wellness Formula 1- 800-225-0904
Innova 1-800-532-7261
Wysong 1-800-748-0188
Flint River Ranch 1-909-682-5048
Life's Abundance 1 - 609-893-5108
Natural Balance 1-800 - 829-4493




  #5  
Old July 5th 03, 05:44 PM
BoxHill
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Default

Whatever you do, don't try to encourage growth by extra vitamins and Large
breed dog food etc.


Actually, large breed puppy food is aimed at slow, steady growth, and is not
the "rocket fuel" that most puppy foods are.

It is a good thing for people with large breed puppies to feed that sort of
food.
Janet

//Dear Artemesia! Poetry's a sna
//Bedlam has many Mansions: have a ca
//Your Muse diverts you, makes the Reader sad:
//You think your self inspir'd; He thinks you mad.
  #6  
Old July 5th 03, 05:45 PM
BoxHill
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Default


It is generally thought that feeding Large Breed dog food is not necessarily
a good idea. It basicly encourages quick early growth which is "not" desired
in large breeds.


In fact, the _reverse_ of this is true when it comes to puppy foods. Large
breed puppy foods are formulated for slower, not faster, growth.
Janet

//Dear Artemesia! Poetry's a sna
//Bedlam has many Mansions: have a ca
//Your Muse diverts you, makes the Reader sad:
//You think your self inspir'd; He thinks you mad.
  #7  
Old July 5th 03, 08:36 PM
Elizabeth DeLeo
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Default


"BoxHill" wrote in message
...

It is generally thought that feeding Large Breed dog food is not

necessarily
a good idea. It basicly encourages quick early growth which is "not"

desired
in large breeds.


In fact, the _reverse_ of this is true when it comes to puppy foods. Large
breed puppy foods are formulated for slower, not faster, growth.
Janet

Hi Janet
By what I have read over recent years, most LB puppy foods contain much
higher rates of Proteins, Calories, Calcium etc. than is thought ideal for
Large breeds, often attributing to a larger body mass resulting in much
stress upon growing bones. Lean rather than fat preferred in puppies. The
higher calcium ratios always a no-no in large breeds. That being thought to
contribute to HOD,OCD,pano, Nutrionally related Wobblers and even CHD. I am
lead to believe that many orthopedic problems are based in nutritional
deficiencies or the overabundance of certain items in the diet.
I remember in the '70's we were all pushing supplements into our dogs as
fast as they could swallow them, and it's a wonder that they survived at
all. Many years ago their was a great uproar over a GD breeder who used to
just throw dead Rabbits to his dogs for their food. As it turned out, his
dogs didn't have nearly the problems other fanciers did - those who fed
pre-made commercial dog foods. That was of course long before BARF came into
focus.
Over the years, having been in touch with literally thousands of Great Dane
fanciers, I have come to believe that a very good "Premium "Adult Food, with
moderate amounts of the above, are to be preferred over foods containing
high levels of ingredients. Admittedly, during the last two years with some
failing eyesight, I have not kept up on new foods etc. and their ingredients
so it quite well might be now that LB puppy foods have downsized their
ingredient content somewhat.
I'm sure we all have our own thoughts on feeding and no doubt many have fed
Gravy Train with good results, but with the advent of the net and the
availability of much info for those who wish to seek it out, at least now we
can all make our own informed decisions on our findings and decide which is
best for our own dogs.
Lizzie


  #8  
Old July 5th 03, 11:22 PM
Rocky
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Default

Elizabeth DeLeo said in rec.pets.dogs.breeds:

Here are some super places to really compare commercial dog
foods and read up a bit on just what dog foods do or
should, contain.


You're preaching to the choir, Lizzie. If you google on food
quality issues in rec.pets.dogs.health, you'll see that you're
not the only one you cares about the quality of food that goes
into our dogs. I'm sorry, but your post comes off as somewhat
condescending.

Over the years, I've done a heck of a lot of research on
commercial foods. My quoting from an Iams site was not intended
as an endorsement of their food, but to show that some food
manufacturers do seem to differentiate between large breed and
"regular" puppies.

Currently, I feed one of my dogs, Friday, raw food. Rocky, my
epileptic dog, eats California Natural because he hasn't had a
seizure in almost a year, so I'm not changing a thing in his
diet.

--
--Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
  #10  
Old July 6th 03, 04:59 AM
BoxHill
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Default


Hi Janet
By what I have read over recent years, most LB puppy foods contain much
higher rates of Proteins, Calories, Calcium etc. than is thought ideal for
Large breeds,


The large breed puppy foods I have seen --and used-- ALL had lower levels of
protein and so on than regular puppy foods. Until they were available, many
larger breed breeders recommended beginning adult food early on in order to get
those lower levels.

I agree with what you say about the effects of high calcium, protein, and so on
on large breed puppies, but I do not agree that those things are found in large
breed puppy foods.

I'm sure we all have our own thoughts on feeding and no doubt many have fed
Gravy Train with good results, but with the advent of the net and the
availability of much info for those who wish to seek it out, at least now we
can all make our own informed decisions on our findings and decide which is
best for our own dogs.
Lizzie


That is certainly the case, but before you discourage some innocent person from
using good large breed puppy food, please go read some labels!

(BTW, I have never fed any dog of mine Gravy Train or anything like it.)
Janet

//Dear Artemesia! Poetry's a sna
//Bedlam has many Mansions: have a ca
//Your Muse diverts you, makes the Reader sad:
//You think your self inspir'd; He thinks you mad.
 




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