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Breeding tips?



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 6th 03, 01:38 PM
Angela Thompson
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Default Breeding tips?

Hi,

Can I firstly take this opportunity to say what a wonderful friendly
newsgroup this seems to be. I have only just found it and I am overwhelmed
by the help and support that you guys give to each other. I hope more
newsgroups follow your lead.

I am writing for some advice. I bought my Lhasa Apso (Britney) in February
2002, she was born 09/01/02, and I am considering breeding her in the
future.

In would very much appreciate any advice that you may be able to give with
respect to the best age to start breeding, where to find the stud, and extra
special care that is needed etc, etc.

Thank you.


  #2  
Old July 6th 03, 04:29 PM
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On Sun, 6 Jul 2003 13:38:25 +0100 Angela Thompson whittled these words:

In would very much appreciate any advice that you may be able to give with
respect to the best age to start breeding, where to find the stud, and extra
special care that is needed etc, etc.


Excellent questions, and very welcome. The first step is to gain a little
book knowledge so you have a foundation for making future decisions.
Reading a couple books on canine genetics will help you become competent
to choose a stud, decide whether to breed your bitch, and best improve the
chances for puppies with a long and healthy life. Start with Control of
Canine Genetic Disease by George Padgett.

The failure of breeders to pay attention to genetics has resulted in a
high rate of genetic disease. Your breed, for example, has a higher than
10% rate of patellar luxation (slipping knees), more than 5% have hip
dysplasia, and there are other problems of note. Unfortnuately your breed
has been badly affected by puppy millers, and temperament can be a
problem. Even in your girl is great and you find a stud who is fine, you
can have problems if there is bad temperament in their parents or grand
parents. AS you can see knowing the dogs in her pedigree is critical to
understanding whether you can continue her traits or whether there are
some darker risks in her background.

All it really takes to become a breeder to be proud of is caring enough to
commit the time and effort, quite a lot of it. Its easy to become a lousy
breeder. Its easy to become the kind of breeder whose dogs end up in
shelters or crippled. It takes a lot more heart to do the work that makes
a healthy happy dog not a matter of luck, but of caring and effort.


See http://www.dog-play.com/be_a_breeder.html

You are definently started in the right direction, asking questions early,
keep up that interest in learning and you will do fine.

Diane Blackman
  #3  
Old July 7th 03, 12:24 AM
David Cohen
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Default


"Angela Thompson" wrote
Hi,

Can I firstly take this opportunity to say what a wonderful friendly
newsgroup this seems to be. I have only just found it and I am

overwhelmed
by the help and support that you guys give to each other. I hope

more
newsgroups follow your lead.


You haven't met me yet.

I am writing for some advice. I bought my Lhasa Apso (Britney) in

February
2002, she was born 09/01/02, and I am considering breeding her in

the
future.


Why? The animal shelters in Britain aren't killing enough dogs to suit
you? You have owned this breed for a total of one and a half years,
and you think you would be a good breeder? What conformation titles
has your dog won? What genetic deseases common to Lhasas has your dog,
and your dog's pedigree proven free from? What are your plans for
health testing your bitch and the stud dog?

In would very much appreciate any advice that you may be able to

give with
respect to the best age to start breeding, where to find the stud,

and extra
special care that is needed etc, etc.


Don't. See, that was easy. Encourage anyone who you might have sold a
puppy to, to adopt one from a Lhasa rescue organization, or get some
nice dog of any breed from an animal shelter.

Thank you.


Yeah, right. You hate what I just told you, and think I'm a horrible
person. You're going to breed your bitch anyway, and a half dozen or
so other dogs will die as a direct result. Keep your thanks.

David
www.geocities.com/sammiesdad/dogs.html


  #4  
Old July 7th 03, 03:14 AM
David Cohen
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"Rocky" wrote
David Cohen said in rec.pets.dogs.breeds:

You haven't met me yet.


I thought that it was cool that a potential breeder passed this
way and asked questions. Recently in the health group, a
similar situation arose and, after receiving responses similar
to those of Diane and Emily, the poster decided that it would be
best to neuter.


Yes, and there are two ways to respond: their nice way, and my
not-so-nice. If either way prevents another [insert worst expletive
you can think of...I'm being "nice" for a moment] backyard breeder
from adding to the misery and death at animal shelters, great.

And their advice was how-to-be-a-good-breeder. I suspect the UK has
enough good Lhasa breeders, so that someone who has owned one dog for
one and a half years should probably take up a different hobby. Like
knitting. Or golf.

David
www.geocities.com/sammiesdad/dogs.html


  #5  
Old July 7th 03, 03:24 AM
Mud E Poz
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Default

suspect the UK has
enough good Lhasa breeders, so that someone who has owned one dog for
one and a half years should probably take up a different hobby. Like
knitting. Or gol


How do you know this for a fact, though? She might have really great lines
that could be really useful. Or at least learn enough to get a 'quality' dog
(I find that work distasteful, too many find my dogs lacking quality, I do not)
before she breeds. Attacking usually does nothing but get hackles up.
  #6  
Old July 7th 03, 04:13 AM
David Cohen
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"Mud E Poz" wrote
suspect the UK has
enough good Lhasa breeders, so that someone who has owned one dog

for
one and a half years should probably take up a different hobby.

Like
knitting. Or gol


How do you know this for a fact, though?


The Kennel Club recognizes 196 breeds. In 2001, the Lhasa Apso was #15
on the list, in terms of number of registered dogs. I think the UK has
enough good Lhasa breeders.

She might have really great lines
that could be really useful.


Yeah. Pigs could learn to fly, too, but what are the odds?

Or at least learn enough to get a 'quality' dog
(I find that work distasteful, too many find my dogs lacking

quality, I do not)
before she breeds.


A loving critter that licks your face when you're feeling low is a
quality dog.

Attacking usually does nothing but get hackles up.


As long as she doesn't submissively pee on my shoes, I'm ok with that.
Everybody around here is so freakin' nice, not nice is useful, if only
for comparison.

David
www.geocities.com/sammiesdad/dogs.html


  #7  
Old July 7th 03, 05:29 AM
David Cohen
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Default


"BoxHill" wrote
Everybody around here is so freakin' nice, not nice is useful, if

only
for comparison.

David


All you are doing is giving the person a reason to ignore you and

discredit
what you say.
Janet


You believe how a person says something is more important in
establishing their credibility than what they actually say.

You are a credit to AOL.

David


  #8  
Old July 7th 03, 05:31 AM
David Cohen
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Default


"BoxHill" wrote

Yes, and there are two ways to respond: their nice way, and my
not-so-nice.


Did you ever hear the expression "you catch more flies with honey

than with
vinegar"?


Did you ever hear the expression "yo mama"?

David


  #9  
Old July 7th 03, 06:38 AM
BoxHill
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You believe how a person says something is more important in
establishing their credibility than what they actually say.

You are a credit to AOL.

David


No, I don't. Nor did I say that.

I suppose that it isn't surprising that your communications problems run both
ways.

I know that both are important. The most logical of arguments will not
penetrate someone's mind if they are couched in terms that cause them to throw
up defenses that prevent them from hearing you.

Do you actually want to prevent the birth of litters of unhealthy, unwanted
puppies doomed to die in shelters, or would you really prefer to seize an
opportunity to exercise what you evidently think of as your "wit"?

If you actually want to have an effect on people's behavior, I suggest you put
your ego aside and model your style of argument on someone like Diane, who has
undoubtedly been reponsible for persuading hundreds of people not to patronize
pet stores, bybs, and mills, and not to breed their dogs unwisely.

By the way, attempting to categorize people's intelligence or techinical
expertise by their choice of ISP got old at least five or six years ago.
Janet

//Dear Artemesia! Poetry's a sna
//Bedlam has many Mansions: have a ca
//Your Muse diverts you, makes the Reader sad:
//You think your self inspir'd; He thinks you mad.
  #10  
Old July 7th 03, 11:40 AM
Mud E Poz
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Default

Did you ever hear the expression "yo mama"?

David


Sweetie, this may surprise you, but I use AOL via RR. I enjoy some of the
services AOL provides, and I can get it anywhere I want.

Quality dogs are NOT dogs that lick your face (only). It is the correct
terminology for dogs that may be considered for breeding programs.

Simply stated: you have as much a clue about the genetics of her dog as I do:
meaning none. Her first step should be to talk and work with her breeder,
either as a mentor, or to find one.

I actually gasp breed. And I could easily have posted this same question 9
years ago.

I did get my answers, and my working/Ch pups.

Thank you very much.
Mindy and the Muddy Paws Pack

UCDX Ch Tribute's Three X The Charm UDX, VCD3, JH, WD, VS, CGC
CH Muddy Paws Tri The Truth VCD2, AXJ, CGC
Muddy Paws Beautiful Trinket TDX, NA, CGC
Practicing evil on another level: UCDX Strange Quark UDT,OA,NAJ
 




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