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A catlike dog?



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 9th 03, 03:40 AM
Rocky
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Default A catlike dog?

Anneliese said in rec.pets.dogs.breeds:

I took some quizzes online and came up with pugs, boston
terriers, bischons, poodles and greyhounds. I love both
pugs and bischons, but have heard that they're notoriously
hard to housebreak. I don't have any personal experience
with Boston terriers, poodles or greyhounds.


Because of your housebreaking concern, you might look at
adopting an adolescent or adult dog from rescue (the pound or
specific mixed or purebred rescue groups).

Of all of the breeds you mention, a Poodle might be best suited
for your needs. Greyhounds are widely available through
adoption, though adopters are often leery of families with young
children (you didn't mention their ages). Small dogs like Pugs
and Bichons are difficult to get through rescue.

On the down side, though generally good dogs, some Poodles can
be individually aggressive, so going through a rescue would help
in getting the dog that would best match your family.

Then there's going to your local animal shelter and trusting
your instincts.

Good luck, it's not easy.

--
--Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
  #2  
Old July 9th 03, 04:12 AM
Tirya
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"Rocky" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

Of all of the breeds you mention, a Poodle might be best suited
for your needs. Greyhounds are widely available through
adoption, though adopters are often leery of families with young
children (you didn't mention their ages). Small dogs like Pugs
and Bichons are difficult to get through rescue.


I'd be hesitant to say that. *YOUNG* small dogs like Pugs and Bichons are
difficult to get through rescue - adults are more easily found. Most major
metro areas will have breed rescues, and even if there isn't one nearby
there's generally a nationwide network online that can help you out.

Tirya



  #3  
Old July 9th 03, 07:18 AM
Robin
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"Anneliese" wrote in message
m...
We are considering getting a dog. Since I had either bad or boring
dogs growing up, and a wonderful cat, I'm more of a cat person, but
that's out due to one childs' allergy (nobody's allergic to dogs). We
are a family of two work-at-home parents and three young homeschooled
children, so except for a couple hours a few times per week, multiple
people will be home all the time. We're looking for:

*a companion dog, must be very good with children.
*low activity level--we're not a super-athletic family. We do have a
medium-sized fenced yard.
*small to medium
*one that will housetrain reliably--this is a biggie for me, and one
reason I prefer cats.
*one that would alert us to strangers around the house, but not
necessarily deter them.


I often think of my dog Annie, as being catlike, in terms of personality.
She is 3/4 shar pei and 1/4 pit bull. She has alot of shar pei personality
traits, in that she is reserved with her affection. Doling out love when she
she's fit, much like a cat. They prefer to be near you, but not
necessarily attached to you or constantly seeking attention. As far as
housetraining goes, I never had a dog housetrain any easier. I got her at 7
1/2 wks of age, and she never poo'd in the house once. Her last urinary
accident in the house was at about 4 months. The destruction during her
entire puppy chewing stage was limited to one set of speaker wire, and a few
small teeth marks on a coffee table leg. As far as strangers go, she will
meet them at my gate, and walk them to my door, but she does not bark at
them. I have socialized my dog very well. She visits my therapy patients
in a nursing home on a regular basis, and knows how to be gentle with
fragile people. I take her to softball games twice a week in season, where
she often gets to interact with very small children. She always seems to
recognize them as being more fragile, and responds accordingly. I would not
recomend leaving them (or any larger dog) unsupervised with children under
the age of 6-7, or even older depending on the children. They are very
intelligent dogs who can learn what you need them to, if you teach them
correctly. I have a 6lb chihuahua who is very aggressive. I knew I could
not change the chi, so I taught Annie that she just had to take what the chi
dished out without retaliating, and she never has. As far as size, shar pei
usually run from 35-60 lbs. Activity wise, a walk around the block, and
some play time in the yard will do on most days. It is important with
them, as with any dog, that you not allow them to play overly aggressivley,
or put their mouths on you. They are very clean dogs, regularly cleaning
themselves in an almost catlike manner. They shed very little. This breed
wasn't in your list of dogs that interested you, but it does fit the
criteria you listed, if you get one on the smallish side of their size
range. If this breed does interest you, I would recomend you do a LOT of
research first. They are very unique dogs, with unique appearances,
personalities, and unfortunately a few unique health problems.

Robin
http://community.webshots.com/album/67771168NDiBDq


  #4  
Old July 9th 03, 07:43 AM
WhansaMi
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I took some quizzes online and came up with pugs, boston terriers,
bischons, poodles and greyhounds. I love both pugs and bischons, but
have heard that they're notoriously hard to housebreak. I don't have
any personal experience with Boston terriers, poodles or greyhounds.


A BT may well be what you are looking for. As others have said, you might want
to consider an adolescent/adult, which would help with the housebreaking,
although my understanding is that BTs are easier to housebreak than many other
small dogs. It would also help with the activity level, as puppies of most
breeds are going to be much more active than adults. As terriers go, the BTs
I've known are a bit less frenetic, and more "gentlemanly".

Sheila
  #6  
Old July 9th 03, 08:32 AM
WhansaMi
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As terriers go, the BTs
I've known are a bit less frenetic, and more "gentlemanly".


...AND absolutely hilarious little spirits. Knew 3 (mom, dgtr, g-dgtr) in
Wash.
state, what huge personalities and extremely lovable


My favorite story about a BT was from a friend of mine whose husband had a BT
before they married. She liked the dog well-enough, but she was more of a cat
person. That is, until one day...

She was pushing their baby in the stroller when a large dog started approaching
her aggressively--growling and crouching. She was frozen, trying to figure if
she should stand her ground or run, when the little BT came bounding across the
street and two houses down to attack that dog! She got the baby into the house
and her husband went to get the BT (who sustained some injuries, but was
ultimately okay).

Sheila
  #8  
Old July 10th 03, 05:15 PM
Suzmyers
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We have a 10 year old BT who has been a joy. He LOVES to play and is very
affectionate. He keeps himself very clean, like a cat . . .he washes his face
and paws before he goes to sleep at night! He has very little short hairs on
his body, so even though he sheds, you hardly notice it at all. He loves to
play with balls ... a lot like a cat, pushing and chasing them all over.
The only problem I see with BT's is they have lots of genetic problems and
you must be sure to get one from a VERY reputable breeder, or a rescue that
knows what the problems are already.
Ours cost us $1000 in surgeries before he was a year old because of knee
problems. The surgeries have totally fixed the problem, and we wouldn't have
done otherwise, but I wish we would have researched breeders and the breed
before we bought him.
Other than that, I think BT's are THE BEST!
Sue M
I took some quizzes online and came up with pugs, boston terriers,
bischons, poodles and greyhounds. I love both pugs and bischons, but
have heard that they're notoriously hard to housebreak. I don't have
any personal experience with Boston terriers, poodles or greyhounds.


A BT may well be what you are looking for. As others have said, you might
want
to consider an adolescent/adult, which would help with the housebreaking,
although my understanding is that BTs are easier to housebreak than many
other
small dogs. It would also help with the activity level, as puppies of most
breeds are going to be much more active than adults. As terriers go, the BTs
I've known are a bit less frenetic, and more "gentlemanly".

Sheila








Sue
"The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing" - Socrates
  #9  
Old July 10th 03, 05:38 PM
ceb
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(Anneliese) wrote in
m:

We are considering getting a dog. Since I had either bad or boring
dogs growing up, and a wonderful cat, I'm more of a cat person, but
that's out due to one childs' allergy (nobody's allergic to dogs). We
are a family of two work-at-home parents and three young homeschooled
children, so except for a couple hours a few times per week, multiple
people will be home all the time. We're looking for:

*a companion dog, must be very good with children.
*low activity level--we're not a super-athletic family. We do have a
medium-sized fenced yard.
*small to medium
*one that will housetrain reliably--this is a biggie for me, and one
reason I prefer cats.
*one that would alert us to strangers around the house, but not
necessarily deter them.

I took some quizzes online and came up with pugs, boston terriers,
bischons, poodles and greyhounds. I love both pugs and bischons, but
have heard that they're notoriously hard to housebreak. I don't have
any personal experience with Boston terriers, poodles or greyhounds.

Any suggestions, or comments on the breeds above? I'm reluctant just
to get a pound dog without knowing something about its natural
activity levels and tendencies. We view dog ownership as a long-term
commitment and I don't want to be stuck with an animal that will
continue to mess in the house after the housebreaking stage, or that
needs more exercise than we can provide.


When I adopted Zoe, a cocker spaniel/chow cross, the shelter worker told
me "chows are the dogs for people who like cats." She was referring to
their independent natures, which seem more catlike than most dogs. Some
people call them "aloof" but that hasn't been my experience. Granted, my
dog is a mixture, but she definitely has the chow independence, and she's
also very smart, and extremely affectionate.

Chows are said to be naturally fastidious, which makes housetraining
quite easy. Zoe was already trained when I got her, at 12 weeks old!

Zoe has a really nice activity level, she loves to play and enjoys long
walks but is not frantically energetic.

There are lots of chows and chow mixes in shelters. The last time I was
at our local shelter, there were some cute little butterballs they said
were golden/chow mixes, which I think would be a great combination. Good
luck in your search.

--Catherine
& Zoe the cockerchow
  #10  
Old July 10th 03, 05:56 PM
shelly
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In ,
ceb typed:

When I adopted Zoe, a cocker spaniel/chow cross, the
shelter worker told me "chows are the dogs for people who
like cats."


i've got a friend who likens them to Cat-Klingon mixes. i
think that's a pretty good description.

shelly (vicious smartypants) and elliott & harriet
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette

 




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