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New Puppy Owner -- some questions...



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 25th 04, 04:57 AM
Jessica McCanse
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Default New Puppy Owner -- some questions...

Hi there... my husband and I just brought home a beautiful 9 week old
Rhodesian Ridgeback girl. We did lots of reading about the breed
itself and about training puppies, but I haven't had a puppy since I
was a little girl (so of course my mom always did the real work), and
a lot of this stuff is sort of new to me.

I have some questions that books can't really answer for me and
hopefully someone wiser and calmer can help me through this.

According to the Art of Raising a Puppy by the Monks of New Skete,
Judo (our pup) is in her fear/avoidance period. For that reason, I'm
not sure how much of her current fear & whininess is just due to the
stage of her life, and the fact that everything is new.

She's doing great with housetraining (I'm crate training her and
watching her every instant she's not in the crate), and so far hasn't
had any accidents. However, she starts whining and screaming
(literally -- she sounds like someone's murdering a woman!) whenever
she can't physically see me. This is a fairly chaotic time, as my
husband and I are moving to another state in 1 week, but I am home
from work this week and have devoted ALL of my time to her. I haven't
been able to do any packing or any of the other things I've planned,
which is ok -- but not if it goes on forever.

Today I tried to gently and gradually get her used to me leaving for
small intervals of time. Unfortunately, with the screaming & whining,
my downstairs neighbor started pounding on his ceiling and it just
couldn't go on. Luckily we are moving in 1 week to a house on many
acres, and the privacy thing won't matter so much anymore.

Mainly, I would like to know if, while she's walking with me on her
leash (which she does very well) but whining all the while, should I
stop and let her cuddle? Should I ignore the whining and keep walking?
I feel like I'm not sure where the line between coddling and brutality
is.

Any help/thoughts would be much appreciated!

Jessica
  #2  
Old May 25th 04, 07:42 AM
Child
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Jessica McCanse" wrote in message
m...

Today I tried to gently and gradually get her used to me leaving for
small intervals of time. Unfortunately, with the screaming & whining,
my downstairs neighbor started pounding on his ceiling and it just
couldn't go on. Luckily we are moving in 1 week to a house on many
acres, and the privacy thing won't matter so much anymore.


You are doing it right, except for the neighbor. vbg She is scared and
lonely and misses her litter. A tired puppy, usually is asleep and not
lonely, so keeping her worn out is a good idea.

Mainly, I would like to know if, while she's walking with me on her
leash (which she does very well) but whining all the while, should I
stop and let her cuddle? Should I ignore the whining and keep walking?
I feel like I'm not sure where the line between coddling and brutality
is.




In this case, I would probably give her a reassuring comment and keep
walking. "ITs fine doggie! Good girl, lets go!"


  #3  
Old May 25th 04, 07:42 AM
Child
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Jessica McCanse" wrote in message
m...

Today I tried to gently and gradually get her used to me leaving for
small intervals of time. Unfortunately, with the screaming & whining,
my downstairs neighbor started pounding on his ceiling and it just
couldn't go on. Luckily we are moving in 1 week to a house on many
acres, and the privacy thing won't matter so much anymore.


You are doing it right, except for the neighbor. vbg She is scared and
lonely and misses her litter. A tired puppy, usually is asleep and not
lonely, so keeping her worn out is a good idea.

Mainly, I would like to know if, while she's walking with me on her
leash (which she does very well) but whining all the while, should I
stop and let her cuddle? Should I ignore the whining and keep walking?
I feel like I'm not sure where the line between coddling and brutality
is.




In this case, I would probably give her a reassuring comment and keep
walking. "ITs fine doggie! Good girl, lets go!"


  #4  
Old May 25th 04, 07:42 AM
Child
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Jessica McCanse" wrote in message
m...

Today I tried to gently and gradually get her used to me leaving for
small intervals of time. Unfortunately, with the screaming & whining,
my downstairs neighbor started pounding on his ceiling and it just
couldn't go on. Luckily we are moving in 1 week to a house on many
acres, and the privacy thing won't matter so much anymore.


You are doing it right, except for the neighbor. vbg She is scared and
lonely and misses her litter. A tired puppy, usually is asleep and not
lonely, so keeping her worn out is a good idea.

Mainly, I would like to know if, while she's walking with me on her
leash (which she does very well) but whining all the while, should I
stop and let her cuddle? Should I ignore the whining and keep walking?
I feel like I'm not sure where the line between coddling and brutality
is.




In this case, I would probably give her a reassuring comment and keep
walking. "ITs fine doggie! Good girl, lets go!"


  #5  
Old May 25th 04, 09:18 AM
AndreaS
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Default

"Jessica McCanse" wrote
snip
According to the Art of Raising a Puppy by the Monks of New Skete


Hi Jessica,

First I have to say I don't at all care for The Art of Raising a Puppy.
IIRC, alpha rolling is recommended, among other things. The Monks are far
too regimented and arbitrary, IMO. At least they were in that book. I
understand the new one is a little better but I've never laid eyes on it.

Today I tried to gently and gradually get her used to me leaving for
small intervals of time. Unfortunately, with the screaming & whining,
my downstairs neighbor started pounding on his ceiling and it just
couldn't go on. Luckily we are moving in 1 week to a house on many
acres, and the privacy thing won't matter so much anymore.


I think if it's only another week until you move, you can wait until then to
start building a little more independence in your pup. But you /do/ want to
do this.

Mainly, I would like to know if, while she's walking with me on her
leash (which she does very well) but whining all the while, should I
stop and let her cuddle? Should I ignore the whining and keep walking?


Neither, precisely. If you cuddle her when she whines, your confirming her
fears by rewarding and "protecting" her. If you ignore her she may get more
worked up. I'd laugh, and tell her what a silly puppy she is as you walk. Be
up beat, happy and loving but not coddling. "Gee, Judo, what are you cryin'
about? This is fun!" Show her the world is a great place.

Congratulations on your new pup!

--
-Andrea Stone
Saorsa Basenjis
http://home1.gte.net/res0s12z/
The Trolls Nest - greenmen, goblins & gargoyle wall art
www.trollsnest.com


  #6  
Old May 25th 04, 09:18 AM
AndreaS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Jessica McCanse" wrote
snip
According to the Art of Raising a Puppy by the Monks of New Skete


Hi Jessica,

First I have to say I don't at all care for The Art of Raising a Puppy.
IIRC, alpha rolling is recommended, among other things. The Monks are far
too regimented and arbitrary, IMO. At least they were in that book. I
understand the new one is a little better but I've never laid eyes on it.

Today I tried to gently and gradually get her used to me leaving for
small intervals of time. Unfortunately, with the screaming & whining,
my downstairs neighbor started pounding on his ceiling and it just
couldn't go on. Luckily we are moving in 1 week to a house on many
acres, and the privacy thing won't matter so much anymore.


I think if it's only another week until you move, you can wait until then to
start building a little more independence in your pup. But you /do/ want to
do this.

Mainly, I would like to know if, while she's walking with me on her
leash (which she does very well) but whining all the while, should I
stop and let her cuddle? Should I ignore the whining and keep walking?


Neither, precisely. If you cuddle her when she whines, your confirming her
fears by rewarding and "protecting" her. If you ignore her she may get more
worked up. I'd laugh, and tell her what a silly puppy she is as you walk. Be
up beat, happy and loving but not coddling. "Gee, Judo, what are you cryin'
about? This is fun!" Show her the world is a great place.

Congratulations on your new pup!

--
-Andrea Stone
Saorsa Basenjis
http://home1.gte.net/res0s12z/
The Trolls Nest - greenmen, goblins & gargoyle wall art
www.trollsnest.com


  #7  
Old May 25th 04, 09:18 AM
AndreaS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Jessica McCanse" wrote
snip
According to the Art of Raising a Puppy by the Monks of New Skete


Hi Jessica,

First I have to say I don't at all care for The Art of Raising a Puppy.
IIRC, alpha rolling is recommended, among other things. The Monks are far
too regimented and arbitrary, IMO. At least they were in that book. I
understand the new one is a little better but I've never laid eyes on it.

Today I tried to gently and gradually get her used to me leaving for
small intervals of time. Unfortunately, with the screaming & whining,
my downstairs neighbor started pounding on his ceiling and it just
couldn't go on. Luckily we are moving in 1 week to a house on many
acres, and the privacy thing won't matter so much anymore.


I think if it's only another week until you move, you can wait until then to
start building a little more independence in your pup. But you /do/ want to
do this.

Mainly, I would like to know if, while she's walking with me on her
leash (which she does very well) but whining all the while, should I
stop and let her cuddle? Should I ignore the whining and keep walking?


Neither, precisely. If you cuddle her when she whines, your confirming her
fears by rewarding and "protecting" her. If you ignore her she may get more
worked up. I'd laugh, and tell her what a silly puppy she is as you walk. Be
up beat, happy and loving but not coddling. "Gee, Judo, what are you cryin'
about? This is fun!" Show her the world is a great place.

Congratulations on your new pup!

--
-Andrea Stone
Saorsa Basenjis
http://home1.gte.net/res0s12z/
The Trolls Nest - greenmen, goblins & gargoyle wall art
www.trollsnest.com


  #8  
Old May 25th 04, 08:34 PM
Rocky
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Posts: n/a
Default

Jessica McCanse said in rec.pets.dogs.behavior:

Today I tried to gently and gradually get her used to me
leaving for small intervals of time. Unfortunately, with
the screaming & whining, my downstairs neighbor started
pounding on his ceiling and it just couldn't go on. Luckily
we are moving in 1 week to a house on many acres, and the
privacy thing won't matter so much anymore.


Since you're moving and since she's new to you and your home,
I'd forgo crate training until you move to your new place. Give
her a chance to get used to you - you'll have to supervise her
carefully, putting her on a strict potty schedule and doing all
of the normal fun stuff when she pees outside.

Meanwhile, leave the crate where it is. Leave the door open and
put her food bowl in it.

Mainly, I would like to know if, while she's walking with
me on her leash (which she does very well) but whining all
the while, should I stop and let her cuddle? Should I
ignore the whining and keep walking? I feel like I'm not
sure where the line between coddling and brutality is.


How long is the walk? Is she fearful or tired? Does this
happen off leash, too? At nine weeks, she needs *some*
reassurance from you, the stranger who has replaced her litter.
As you note, though, too much coddling is not good, and every
dog is different. A puppy behaviour/socialisation class would
be worthwhile.

--
--Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
  #9  
Old May 25th 04, 08:34 PM
Rocky
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Jessica McCanse said in rec.pets.dogs.behavior:

Today I tried to gently and gradually get her used to me
leaving for small intervals of time. Unfortunately, with
the screaming & whining, my downstairs neighbor started
pounding on his ceiling and it just couldn't go on. Luckily
we are moving in 1 week to a house on many acres, and the
privacy thing won't matter so much anymore.


Since you're moving and since she's new to you and your home,
I'd forgo crate training until you move to your new place. Give
her a chance to get used to you - you'll have to supervise her
carefully, putting her on a strict potty schedule and doing all
of the normal fun stuff when she pees outside.

Meanwhile, leave the crate where it is. Leave the door open and
put her food bowl in it.

Mainly, I would like to know if, while she's walking with
me on her leash (which she does very well) but whining all
the while, should I stop and let her cuddle? Should I
ignore the whining and keep walking? I feel like I'm not
sure where the line between coddling and brutality is.


How long is the walk? Is she fearful or tired? Does this
happen off leash, too? At nine weeks, she needs *some*
reassurance from you, the stranger who has replaced her litter.
As you note, though, too much coddling is not good, and every
dog is different. A puppy behaviour/socialisation class would
be worthwhile.

--
--Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
  #10  
Old May 25th 04, 08:34 PM
Rocky
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Jessica McCanse said in rec.pets.dogs.behavior:

Today I tried to gently and gradually get her used to me
leaving for small intervals of time. Unfortunately, with
the screaming & whining, my downstairs neighbor started
pounding on his ceiling and it just couldn't go on. Luckily
we are moving in 1 week to a house on many acres, and the
privacy thing won't matter so much anymore.


Since you're moving and since she's new to you and your home,
I'd forgo crate training until you move to your new place. Give
her a chance to get used to you - you'll have to supervise her
carefully, putting her on a strict potty schedule and doing all
of the normal fun stuff when she pees outside.

Meanwhile, leave the crate where it is. Leave the door open and
put her food bowl in it.

Mainly, I would like to know if, while she's walking with
me on her leash (which she does very well) but whining all
the while, should I stop and let her cuddle? Should I
ignore the whining and keep walking? I feel like I'm not
sure where the line between coddling and brutality is.


How long is the walk? Is she fearful or tired? Does this
happen off leash, too? At nine weeks, she needs *some*
reassurance from you, the stranger who has replaced her litter.
As you note, though, too much coddling is not good, and every
dog is different. A puppy behaviour/socialisation class would
be worthwhile.

--
--Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
 




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