A dog & canine forum. DogBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » DogBanter forum » Dog forums » Dog behavior
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Hair today ...



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old May 26th 04, 03:45 PM
Chris
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Hair today ...

An hour ago, after feeding my feral cat colony (stable, now, thank
heaven), I stood for a while enjoying their sleek, gleaming coats. And,
btw, I've begun preparing a separate pail of food for the shelter dogs
to add to the ration of those in poor coat condition. It's based on
eggs, scrambled in canola oil. What else should I add?
I've thought of coat condition as primaily cosmetic, making the dogs
more attractive to adopters. But, it's more than that, isn't it? This
is an interesting article, indicating that it applies to us, too.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...cience_hair_dc

  #2  
Old May 26th 04, 04:14 PM
J1Boss
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I've thought of coat condition as primaily cosmetic, making the dogs
more attractive to adopters. But, it's more than that, isn't it?


Hair condition can be a big indicator of overall health. Of course, we have to
take into account what the appropriate texture is for a given breed/type/ethnic
background. We wouldn't expect a WFT to have the gleaming black coat of a FCR
for instance! (although I think it's the prettiest coat in dogdom of course).

For years, I've had people ask what kind of shampoo I use on my dogs, because
their coats are so gorgeous. I could say mud packs, because they surely have
those more than shampoo! The fact is that they don't get baths unless
there's a medical reason. They get wet as often as they possibly can, but that
gloss and sweet smell comes fromm INSIDE, not any externals I can dump on them.

Janet Boss
http://bestfriendsdogobedience.com/
http://photos.yahoo.com/bestfriendsobedience

  #3  
Old May 26th 04, 04:14 PM
J1Boss
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I've thought of coat condition as primaily cosmetic, making the dogs
more attractive to adopters. But, it's more than that, isn't it?


Hair condition can be a big indicator of overall health. Of course, we have to
take into account what the appropriate texture is for a given breed/type/ethnic
background. We wouldn't expect a WFT to have the gleaming black coat of a FCR
for instance! (although I think it's the prettiest coat in dogdom of course).

For years, I've had people ask what kind of shampoo I use on my dogs, because
their coats are so gorgeous. I could say mud packs, because they surely have
those more than shampoo! The fact is that they don't get baths unless
there's a medical reason. They get wet as often as they possibly can, but that
gloss and sweet smell comes fromm INSIDE, not any externals I can dump on them.

Janet Boss
http://bestfriendsdogobedience.com/
http://photos.yahoo.com/bestfriendsobedience

  #4  
Old May 26th 04, 04:14 PM
J1Boss
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I've thought of coat condition as primaily cosmetic, making the dogs
more attractive to adopters. But, it's more than that, isn't it?


Hair condition can be a big indicator of overall health. Of course, we have to
take into account what the appropriate texture is for a given breed/type/ethnic
background. We wouldn't expect a WFT to have the gleaming black coat of a FCR
for instance! (although I think it's the prettiest coat in dogdom of course).

For years, I've had people ask what kind of shampoo I use on my dogs, because
their coats are so gorgeous. I could say mud packs, because they surely have
those more than shampoo! The fact is that they don't get baths unless
there's a medical reason. They get wet as often as they possibly can, but that
gloss and sweet smell comes fromm INSIDE, not any externals I can dump on them.

Janet Boss
http://bestfriendsdogobedience.com/
http://photos.yahoo.com/bestfriendsobedience

  #5  
Old May 26th 04, 05:11 PM
Tracy Doyle
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Chris wrote:

An hour ago, after feeding my feral cat colony (stable, now, thank
heaven), I stood for a while enjoying their sleek, gleaming coats. And,
btw, I've begun preparing a separate pail of food for the shelter dogs
to add to the ration of those in poor coat condition. It's based on
eggs, scrambled in canola oil. What else should I add?


Hi, Chris... Great question!

There are several things you can do to help get a glistening coat. You
can buy an expensive dog coat supplement rich in Omega-3s (which is best
for overall health, since these oils benefit more than the coat). Or,
you can march yourself down to your local feed store and get a horse
supplement called "Super 14." It's a powder, and it comes with a little
scoop - add 1/2 to a full scoop to the dog food per day (not per
feeding). The most dramatic diet-based coat change I've gotten from my
dogs is when I feed Nutro Nature's Choice food - they guarantee it to
improve coat condition, and it does! But it's not cheap.

If you're prepping a dog to show it to a potential adopter, you can get
a coat conditioner for horses called "Show Sheen." It's a silicon spray.
After bathing a dog and toweling him, mist him all over with this stuff
and work it well into the coat, brush to smooth and leave to dry. It
will make the coat very slick and shiny - it's incredible stuff! (Don't
use it before going into the conformation ring, though - it's a "coat
altering substance" and can get you in trouble!). If the dogs aren't
going to be bathed, give the coat a light brushing, spray Show Sheen on
him and give him a good, deep currying, then smooth the coat with a soft
brush - the Show Sheen will help loosen deep dirt, and will keep dirt
from sticking to him. Be careful to wash it off your hands afterward -
it makes them very slick. It will make the dog slick, too, so make sure
to have a collar on him before you apply it.

BTW, if a dog has a very dull and dirty coat and doesn't have any
particular skin sensitivities, I like to bathe with Murphy's Oil Soap.
It's cheaper than the fancy conditioning shampoos, smells great but not
perfumey, and is very good at getting off grimy or deep dirt, and
conditions at the same time.

I've thought of coat condition as primaily cosmetic, making the dogs
more attractive to adopters. But, it's more than that, isn't it?


Absolutely! A shiny, resilient coat is always a good indicator of
health. A dull, patchy coat can indicate worms, malnutrition, allergies,
organ failure, a multitude of skin conditions, etc.

This
is an interesting article, indicating that it applies to us, too.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...cience_hair_dc


Thanks for the interesting link!

Hope these suggestions help...

Tracy
  #6  
Old May 26th 04, 05:11 PM
Tracy Doyle
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Chris wrote:

An hour ago, after feeding my feral cat colony (stable, now, thank
heaven), I stood for a while enjoying their sleek, gleaming coats. And,
btw, I've begun preparing a separate pail of food for the shelter dogs
to add to the ration of those in poor coat condition. It's based on
eggs, scrambled in canola oil. What else should I add?


Hi, Chris... Great question!

There are several things you can do to help get a glistening coat. You
can buy an expensive dog coat supplement rich in Omega-3s (which is best
for overall health, since these oils benefit more than the coat). Or,
you can march yourself down to your local feed store and get a horse
supplement called "Super 14." It's a powder, and it comes with a little
scoop - add 1/2 to a full scoop to the dog food per day (not per
feeding). The most dramatic diet-based coat change I've gotten from my
dogs is when I feed Nutro Nature's Choice food - they guarantee it to
improve coat condition, and it does! But it's not cheap.

If you're prepping a dog to show it to a potential adopter, you can get
a coat conditioner for horses called "Show Sheen." It's a silicon spray.
After bathing a dog and toweling him, mist him all over with this stuff
and work it well into the coat, brush to smooth and leave to dry. It
will make the coat very slick and shiny - it's incredible stuff! (Don't
use it before going into the conformation ring, though - it's a "coat
altering substance" and can get you in trouble!). If the dogs aren't
going to be bathed, give the coat a light brushing, spray Show Sheen on
him and give him a good, deep currying, then smooth the coat with a soft
brush - the Show Sheen will help loosen deep dirt, and will keep dirt
from sticking to him. Be careful to wash it off your hands afterward -
it makes them very slick. It will make the dog slick, too, so make sure
to have a collar on him before you apply it.

BTW, if a dog has a very dull and dirty coat and doesn't have any
particular skin sensitivities, I like to bathe with Murphy's Oil Soap.
It's cheaper than the fancy conditioning shampoos, smells great but not
perfumey, and is very good at getting off grimy or deep dirt, and
conditions at the same time.

I've thought of coat condition as primaily cosmetic, making the dogs
more attractive to adopters. But, it's more than that, isn't it?


Absolutely! A shiny, resilient coat is always a good indicator of
health. A dull, patchy coat can indicate worms, malnutrition, allergies,
organ failure, a multitude of skin conditions, etc.

This
is an interesting article, indicating that it applies to us, too.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...cience_hair_dc


Thanks for the interesting link!

Hope these suggestions help...

Tracy
  #7  
Old May 26th 04, 05:11 PM
Tracy Doyle
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Chris wrote:

An hour ago, after feeding my feral cat colony (stable, now, thank
heaven), I stood for a while enjoying their sleek, gleaming coats. And,
btw, I've begun preparing a separate pail of food for the shelter dogs
to add to the ration of those in poor coat condition. It's based on
eggs, scrambled in canola oil. What else should I add?


Hi, Chris... Great question!

There are several things you can do to help get a glistening coat. You
can buy an expensive dog coat supplement rich in Omega-3s (which is best
for overall health, since these oils benefit more than the coat). Or,
you can march yourself down to your local feed store and get a horse
supplement called "Super 14." It's a powder, and it comes with a little
scoop - add 1/2 to a full scoop to the dog food per day (not per
feeding). The most dramatic diet-based coat change I've gotten from my
dogs is when I feed Nutro Nature's Choice food - they guarantee it to
improve coat condition, and it does! But it's not cheap.

If you're prepping a dog to show it to a potential adopter, you can get
a coat conditioner for horses called "Show Sheen." It's a silicon spray.
After bathing a dog and toweling him, mist him all over with this stuff
and work it well into the coat, brush to smooth and leave to dry. It
will make the coat very slick and shiny - it's incredible stuff! (Don't
use it before going into the conformation ring, though - it's a "coat
altering substance" and can get you in trouble!). If the dogs aren't
going to be bathed, give the coat a light brushing, spray Show Sheen on
him and give him a good, deep currying, then smooth the coat with a soft
brush - the Show Sheen will help loosen deep dirt, and will keep dirt
from sticking to him. Be careful to wash it off your hands afterward -
it makes them very slick. It will make the dog slick, too, so make sure
to have a collar on him before you apply it.

BTW, if a dog has a very dull and dirty coat and doesn't have any
particular skin sensitivities, I like to bathe with Murphy's Oil Soap.
It's cheaper than the fancy conditioning shampoos, smells great but not
perfumey, and is very good at getting off grimy or deep dirt, and
conditions at the same time.

I've thought of coat condition as primaily cosmetic, making the dogs
more attractive to adopters. But, it's more than that, isn't it?


Absolutely! A shiny, resilient coat is always a good indicator of
health. A dull, patchy coat can indicate worms, malnutrition, allergies,
organ failure, a multitude of skin conditions, etc.

This
is an interesting article, indicating that it applies to us, too.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...cience_hair_dc


Thanks for the interesting link!

Hope these suggestions help...

Tracy
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Vacuuming dog hair Natty_Dread Dog behavior 0 October 29th 03 02:25 PM
patches of hair missing AlexH Dog health 8 October 29th 03 03:25 AM
fur allergies, hair and poodles sighthounds etc. Dog behavior 17 September 8th 03 01:17 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.2.0 (Unregistered)
Copyright 2004-2019 DogBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.