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GSP health problem?



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 2nd 03, 04:41 PM
Sasha
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default GSP health problem?

Howdy everyone,

I have a SGP/Husky Mix, at about 4 months of age the dog started to have
erections. However it seems to have them so often that im beging to think
there might be a health problem.

It happens when the dog is sitting or is laying. I dont know what to do, it
is very embarrasing.

By the way, the dog is not neutered and intend to keep it's manlyhood in
tact.


  #2  
Old November 2nd 03, 06:20 PM
Sharon too
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I have a SGP/Husky Mix, at about 4 months of age the dog started to have
erections. However it seems to have them so often that im beging to think
there might be a health problem.


It happens. The dog is happy - and in tact.

By the way, the dog is not neutered and intend to keep it's manlyhood in
tact.


That's nice, but you also put him at risk for medical problems down the road
including cancer. You have to weigh the risks. Your embarrassment and dog's
"pride" (yarite) vs: the life and general health of your dog.

-Sharon


  #3  
Old November 2nd 03, 07:49 PM
KrisHur
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"Sasha" wrote in message
m...

By the way, the dog is not neutered and intend to keep it's manlyhood in
tact.


Why? Neutered dogs enjoy life just as much, if not more, than their intact
buddies.

5 reasons to neuter:
1) Intact males are often targeted by neutered males--you may find that you
cannot get out and socialize at dog parks or anywhere where dogs and their
owners gather.
2) Neutered males are less likely to mark in the house and do less marking
of your trees and bushes.
3) Neutered males can be left alone outside--if a female is in heat within 5
miles of your house your boy will try anything to get out to get to her. If
he smells a bitch in heat when he's off-lead you can say good-bye to him b/c
he's MTL not going to come back and you become one of the people responsible
for the pet over-population problem. Research indicates that 80% of dogs hit
by cars are intact males, neutered males are much less likely to roam.
4) There is zero chance that he will develop testicular cancer and prostrate
problems are greatly reduced.
5) Removing his urge to mate focuses more of a his attention on you, aiding
in training.

--
Kristen and
Kali CDX, CGC, TDIA, TT
www.kristenandkali.com




  #4  
Old November 2nd 03, 08:19 PM
Ebbtide
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Default

Very well put, and thanks!!!




"KrisHur" wrote in message
...
"Sasha" wrote in message
m...

By the way, the dog is not neutered and intend to keep it's manlyhood in
tact.


Why? Neutered dogs enjoy life just as much, if not more, than their intact
buddies.

5 reasons to neuter:
1) Intact males are often targeted by neutered males--you may find that

you
cannot get out and socialize at dog parks or anywhere where dogs and their
owners gather.
2) Neutered males are less likely to mark in the house and do less marking
of your trees and bushes.
3) Neutered males can be left alone outside--if a female is in heat within

5
miles of your house your boy will try anything to get out to get to her.

If
he smells a bitch in heat when he's off-lead you can say good-bye to him

b/c
he's MTL not going to come back and you become one of the people

responsible
for the pet over-population problem. Research indicates that 80% of dogs

hit
by cars are intact males, neutered males are much less likely to roam.
4) There is zero chance that he will develop testicular cancer and

prostrate
problems are greatly reduced.
5) Removing his urge to mate focuses more of a his attention on you,

aiding
in training.

--
Kristen and
Kali CDX, CGC, TDIA, TT
www.kristenandkali.com






  #5  
Old November 2nd 03, 09:19 PM
buglady
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Sasha" wrote in message
m...
I dont know what to do, it is very embarrasing.

.........Then quit staring at him!

By the way, the dog is not neutered and intend to keep it's manlyhood

intact.

........Why?

buglady
take out the dog before replying


  #6  
Old November 2nd 03, 10:28 PM
mi-c--hae.l
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Default



KrisHur wrote:
"Sasha" wrote in message
m...

By the way, the dog is not neutered and intend to keep it's manlyhood in
tact.



Why? Neutered dogs enjoy life just as much, if not more, than their intact
buddies.

5 reasons to neuter:
1) Intact males are often targeted by neutered males--you may find that you
cannot get out and socialize at dog parks or anywhere where dogs and their
owners gather.


nonsense


2) Neutered males are less likely to mark in the house and do less marking
of your trees and bushes.


nonsense



3) Neutered males can be left alone outside--if a female is in heat within 5
miles of your house your boy will try anything to get out to get to her. If
he smells a bitch in heat when he's off-lead you can say good-bye to him b/c
he's MTL not going to come back and you become one of the people responsible
for the pet over-population problem. Research indicates that 80% of dogs hit
by cars are intact males, neutered males are much less likely to roam.


you've obviously never owned an intact male dog, much less two of them
who go running offleash everyday.



4) There is zero chance that he will develop testicular cancer and prostrate
problems are greatly reduced.


now that is toxic mommy spay/neuter nazi nonsense propaganda.

here is science which directly contradicts what you are babbling:

NEUTERED MALES HAVE THE SHORTEST LIFE SPAN OF ALL TYPES OF DOGS STUDIED
-----------------------------------------------------------
Longevity of British breeds of dog and its relationships with sex, size,
cardiovascular variables and disease

(British study of lifespan averages for dog breeds)
source: A.R. Michell
Veterinary Record vol 145 no 22 November 27 1999
starts p 625, 5 pages long


A British study has recorded links between dog breeds and longevity,
using a questionnaire covering 3,126 dogs. The dogs lived for a mean
average of 11 years 1 month, rising to 12 years 8 months for those dying
of natural causes, while the median average was 12 years for all dogs,
and 13 years 2 months for dogs dying of natural causes. One dog survived
to 22 years, and 8% of dogs survived to be over 15 years, while 26%
reached 14 years or more. Neutered bitches lived longest of dogs dying
of all causes, though entire bitches lived longest of dogs dying of
natural causes, with neutered males having the shortest lifespan in each
category.

-----------------------------------------------------


NEUTERED MALES have the HIGHEST RATE FOR PROSTATE CANCER
---------------------------------------------------
Canine prostate carcinoma: epidemiological evidence of an
increased risk in castrated dogs.

Teske E, Naan EC, van Dijk EM, Van Garderen E, Schalken JA.

Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals,
Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.154, 3508 TD, Utrecht, The
Netherlands

The present retrospective study investigated the frequency
of prostate carcinoma (PCA) among prostate abnormalities in
dogs and determined whether castration influences the
incidence of PCA in dogs. During the years 1993-1998, 15363
male dogs were admitted to the Utrecht University Clinic of
Companion Animals, and of these dogs 225 were diagnosed
with prostatic disease. In addition, another 206 male dogs
were diagnosed as having prostatic disease based on
cytologic examination of aspiration biopsies submitted by
referring veterinarians. Benign prostatic hyperplasia was
diagnosed in 246 dogs (57.1%), prostatitis in 83 dogs
(19.3%), and PCA in 56 dogs (13%). Dogs with PCA were
significantly older (mean age=9.9 years) than dogs with
other prostatic diseases (mean age=8.4 years). The Bouvier
des Flandres breed had an increased risk (odds ratio
(OR)=8.44; 95% CI 4.38-16.1) of having PCA. Castration
(26/56) increased the risk (OR=4.34; 95% CI 2.48-7.62) of
PCA. The mean age at diagnosis of PCA in castrated dogs and
in intact male dogs was not significantly different. The
interval between castration and onset of prostatic problems
was highly variable, suggesting that castration does not
initiate the development of PCA in the dog, but it does
favour tumor progression.
------------------------------------------------


5) Removing his urge to mate focuses more of a his attention on you, aiding
in training.


It removes a lot. It removes a part of the dog which affects his brain
and body and organ systems, and it is a part that makes you
uncomfortable. People who are comfortable with dogs don't feel the need
to cut parts out.

back to your regularly scheduled spay/neuter nazi dog hating nonsense.

HTH!!!

michael
reporting live...
http://dogtv.com




  #7  
Old November 2nd 03, 11:05 PM
Sasha
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

It is very difficult not to notice when that thing comes out to play!




"buglady" wrote in message
ink.net...

"Sasha" wrote in message
m...
I dont know what to do, it is very embarrasing.

........Then quit staring at him!

By the way, the dog is not neutered and intend to keep it's manlyhood

intact.

.......Why?

buglady
take out the dog before replying




  #8  
Old November 3rd 03, 01:17 AM
Sharon too
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Crap, psychotic crap, all of it. Michael get back in my killfile with all of
your fellow nuts.

Never read such utter uneducated bullcrap.

Aren't there some camels over in Afghanistan that need you, Michael?


  #9  
Old November 3rd 03, 07:06 AM
m-ic--hae.l
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Sharon too wrote:
Crap, psychotic crap, all of it.


It sounds like you are having a psychotic reaction to major scientific
studies which don't match with your dog hating spay/neuter nazi
lie-aganda. I can understand why you are upset. Most of what you preach
and lie and harass and nag in order to get people to cut parts out of
their dogs is wrong.

so you're going KucKOOO! for Coconuts...

CUCKOO!!!
KUCKOOOOO!!!
ding!
ding!
ding!

CUCKOO!!!
KUCKOOOOO!!!
ding!
ding!
ding!

here it is again for your reading pleasure!

HTH!!!

michael
reporting live...
http://dogtv.com




NEUTERED MALES HAVE THE SHORTEST LIFE SPAN OF ALL TYPES OF DOGS STUDIED
-----------------------------------------------------------
Longevity of British breeds of dog and its relationships with sex, size,
cardiovascular variables and disease

(British study of lifespan averages for dog breeds)
source: A.R. Michell
Veterinary Record vol 145 no 22 November 27 1999
starts p 625, 5 pages long


A British study has recorded links between dog breeds and longevity,
using a questionnaire covering 3,126 dogs. The dogs lived for a mean
average of 11 years 1 month, rising to 12 years 8 months for those dying
of natural causes, while the median average was 12 years for all dogs,
and 13 years 2 months for dogs dying of natural causes. One dog survived
to 22 years, and 8% of dogs survived to be over 15 years, while 26%
reached 14 years or more. Neutered bitches lived longest of dogs dying
of all causes, though entire bitches lived longest of dogs dying of
natural causes, with neutered males having the shortest lifespan in each
category.

-----------------------------------------------------


NEUTERED MALES have the HIGHEST RATE FOR PROSTATE CANCER
---------------------------------------------------
Canine prostate carcinoma: epidemiological evidence of an
increased risk in castrated dogs.

Teske E, Naan EC, van Dijk EM, Van Garderen E, Schalken JA.

Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals,
Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.154, 3508 TD, Utrecht, The
Netherlands

The present retrospective study investigated the frequency
of prostate carcinoma (PCA) among prostate abnormalities in
dogs and determined whether castration influences the
incidence of PCA in dogs. During the years 1993-1998, 15363
male dogs were admitted to the Utrecht University Clinic of
Companion Animals, and of these dogs 225 were diagnosed
with prostatic disease. In addition, another 206 male dogs
were diagnosed as having prostatic disease based on
cytologic examination of aspiration biopsies submitted by
referring veterinarians. Benign prostatic hyperplasia was
diagnosed in 246 dogs (57.1%), prostatitis in 83 dogs
(19.3%), and PCA in 56 dogs (13%). Dogs with PCA were
significantly older (mean age=9.9 years) than dogs with
other prostatic diseases (mean age=8.4 years). The Bouvier
des Flandres breed had an increased risk (odds ratio
(OR)=8.44; 95% CI 4.38-16.1) of having PCA. Castration
(26/56) increased the risk (OR=4.34; 95% CI 2.48-7.62) of
PCA. The mean age at diagnosis of PCA in castrated dogs and
in intact male dogs was not significantly different. The
interval between castration and onset of prostatic problems
was highly variable, suggesting that castration does not
initiate the development of PCA in the dog, but it does
favour tumor progression.
------------------------------------------------









Michael get back in my killfile with all of
your fellow nuts.

Never read such utter uneducated bullcrap.


BWHAAHHAHHAHAHAHHAAAA!!!

uneducated?
It's major universities doing studies on dogs and you call that uneducated?

BWHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAAAHAHAA!!!!


Aren't there some camels over in Afghanistan that need you, Michael?



  #10  
Old November 3rd 03, 01:03 PM
Rosa Palmén
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Sasha" wrote in message
m...
Howdy everyone,

I have a SGP/Husky Mix, at about 4 months of age the dog started to have
erections. However it seems to have them so often that im beging to think
there might be a health problem.

It happens when the dog is sitting or is laying. I dont know what to do,

it
is very embarrasing.

By the way, the dog is not neutered and intend to keep it's manlyhood in
tact.



Hi

I think that if you are worried about it you should call your vet and tell
him/her how often this happens. I don't think it's a problem but it never
hurts to ask your vet.
I think it might get less frequent when the dog grows out of his "puberty",
you just have to wait and see.
If it really, really bothers you then i guess you can always ask the dog to
change position or go into another room.

Rosa


 




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