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Aggressive rough collie, hormones, ovarian cysts



 
 
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Old April 15th 05, 12:05 PM
YourConscience
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Default Aggressive rough collie, hormones, ovarian cysts

HOWEDY Master Of Deception blankman,

You're a proven liar, dog abuser, coward, and mentally ill.

EVERY THING you're tellin is is DEAD WRONG.

You can't post your idiocy here abHOWETS nodoGgamenedMOOR.

wrote:
On 11 Apr 2005 08:16:44 -0700 ellerslie

whittled these words:
wrote in message
roups.com...
Has anyone else out there had problems with possible ovarian cycts

in
their dog causing hormonal problems that affect their dog's

aggression?

I can't speak to persnal experience.

My rough collie bitch was always a little highly strung, but after

she
had pups at two years old she has never had any problems, all

three of
her pups have super temperaments, but her pedigree does have a lot

of
line breeding in it.


Line breeding doesn't cause bad temperament, it would allow it to be

more
easily expressed (occur more often) if it is in the lines. What is
important in looking at the genetic component is knowing the lines.

Most
breeders don't which is a problem and why buyers need to demand
better knowledge in their breeders.

Unfortunately she still behaves slightly aggressively, foot-

snapping,
and won't let me groom her easily. She is seven now, we also have

her
son who is five.


This is a problem that would have been beter addressed earlier.
Temperament explains behavior but does not excuse it. Good trainng

can't
resolve all behaviorial issues but it most likely could resolve

those.

Does anyone have any clues as to whether this could just be

behaviour
that she was so used to performing that taking the ovearies hasn't
altered it or has anyone had problems like this with rough

collies??

I'd say both. Your explanation makes it sound like you haven't taken
advantage of any in person expertise in getting appropriate behavior.

t
is a common but sad thing that people accept and live around

unacceptable
behavior instead of sorting out a truly competent proffessional to

help
resolve it. I do understand that identifying a compent trainer isn't


necessarily easy, but people tend to not even take the kinds of steps

they
would in seeking a doctor, dentist, financial advisor - and they

should.

YOu can do that now. Given the type of problem you are reporting I

would
not expect it to be a significant investment to be shown in person
processes that will help. I would not expect a cure at this late

date,
but it is possible so well worth attempting. In any case I would

expect
improvement. I can't refer you directly but I have resources you can


explore on
http://www.dogplay.com/Behavior/

Are you saying that dogs personalities are 100% consequences of

their
life experiences and has no genetic basis whatsoever? Our puppy was
quite "highly strung" from day one and I treated her the same as

any
other puppy, ignoring bad behaviours, rewarding good behaviours

etc...
not punishing violently, not putting her in distressing situations,

I
properly accustomed her to being left alone, she was widely
socialised, and is fine with other dogs and animals. So how can it

be
possible to make the statement that dogs that are highly strung are
only such because of "mishandling", i.e. incorrect or bad handling

?

Ah - I should be grateful for once that you failed to follow polite

usenet
procedure and quote the person to whom you are responding. Most of

us
have him blocked for obvious reasons. Sometimes the way people access

the
newsgroups masks from them the distinctions from other groups they

may be
used to. Usenet is distributed very differently. FOr that reason the

way
you see things is not necessarily teh way others do. Posts can and

do
arrive out of order. So it is necessary to include the relevant

portion
of the post you are responding to, to give it context. If you prefer

not
to read resonses from a paricular sned you can block them, many of us

find
this feature useful.

--
Diane Blackman
http://dog-play.com/
http://dogplay.com/Shop/


 




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