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Is a fence-jumper trouble?



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 2nd 03, 04:47 PM
Shelly & The Boys
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Default Is a fence-jumper trouble?


"THW" wrote in message
...
They say that we will need an invisible fence to contain her
(not an issue since that was our plan anyway), but my questions to the
group
a will such a dog likely be hyper, and what is it like living with a
fence jumper?


An invisible fence, or a real 4' or higher fence? (FWIW, I wouldn't have
an invisible fence, mainly because our fence is more to keep other
critters--ie. stray dogs & wildlife--OUT, than it is to keep our dogs in).
Both of my dogs could potentially be labeled "hyper" (they are
both incredibly active breeds/breed-mixes). However, one of my
favorites sayings is, "A tired dog is a good dog!" Meaning, they
get a LOT of exercise, both mentally & physically. And, they are
herding breeds/breed-mixes, which generally have a tendance to
stick around, not be runners/bolters/adventurers (there are ALWAYS
exceptions to the rule, however! Our rescue GSD was a
talented escape artist. She did not jump the fence, but literally pushed
her way into a few of the boards enough times so that they
became loose & she could get loose. Once she figured out how to
do it, she tried it everywhere on the fence. She had a pretty high
prey drive, and liked to go try to chase/kill small critters--squirrel,
bunnies & the like).
But, I've not seen a lot of correlation between "hyper" and fence-jumping.
Moreso a correlation between higher prey drive and fence-jumping/
escaping.

Will the dog outgrow fence jumping, and how do you visit
people and/or can you easily find dog-sitters/kennels that can deal with
this problem if you need to go away?


Outgrowing, I don't know. More than likely, you will need to
exercise, interact and supervise the dog enough so that it isn't
allowed the chance to escape. I know the vet clinic where I work
also has dog boarding, we have a few "escapees" that come and
(knock on wood!) haven't had any issues. Many professional
places are set up with double and triple door situations, where if
one door is open & the dog escapes, it is stopped by the next.
Most likely, that is something you'd have to ask around with
sitters/kennels.

We also located another setter in an SPCA shelter that seems sweet but is

so
thin (and has been that way for over a month) that we are worried that it

is
hard to judge her disposition and we worry about long term health issues.
Any advice?


Potentially...but also keep in mind that if a dog has been in a stressful
situation for a long period of time (and over a month would certainly
be included), it's body also deals with stress. Weight loss, poor coat,
hyperactivity (and sulleness in some individuals) can all be signs of
a stressed out dog. I know that one of my dogs used to not
be a very good eater when he is boarded, particularly because he
would get very stressed out while being there (and we've never
boarded them over a week). The last time he was boarded, he
went to his agility instructors, where he was interacted with on
a regular basis, exercised and played with, and he ate well.

Good luck in your searches.
Shelly & The Boys:
Coda (Collie-somethin')
Bodhi (Belgian Sheepdog)


  #2  
Old August 2nd 03, 09:45 PM
Charles Richmond
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THW wrote:

[snip...] [snip...] [snip...]

We have located a rescue group that says that they have a young female
english setter that is a fence jumper. No word yet as to the hyperactivity
level of the dog (though the rescuer says that there is no correlation
between hyperactivity and fence jumping), but we are told is very sweet and
good with kids. They say that we will need an invisible fence to contain her
(not an issue since that was our plan anyway), but my questions to the group
a will such a dog likely be hyper, and what is it like living with a
fence jumper? Will the dog outgrow fence jumping, and how do you visit
people and/or can you easily find dog-sitters/kennels that can deal with
this problem if you need to go away?

I don't know about hyperactivity and fence jumping...but a male dog that
is neutered, is *much* less likely to wander off. (Besides all the other
good reasons to spay or neuter.)

Sometimes it seems like you only want advice here, if it already
agrees with what you think. Many here have already voiced opposition
to an "invisible fence", but you persist in thinking that it's the
best thing since "sliced bread"...

--
+----------------------------------------------------------------+
| Charles and Francis Richmond richmond at plano dot net |
+----------------------------------------------------------------+
  #3  
Old August 3rd 03, 02:04 AM
Tara O.
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Something to ask the rescue: is this female currently in an indoor-only
environment and if so, for how long? was she previously an outside-only
dog? When was she spayed?

The reasons for these questions could provide insight into the fence-jumping
issue. Some dogs are just easily bored or curious so they want to jump.
Once they've learned that they can do it, they don't want to stop. However,
some dogs are more prone than others to fence jumping because:

a) they are intact and looking to mate
b) they are outside-only dogs and looking for companionship

If this female was an outside-only dog who was bored, then that's probably
why she started fence jumping. If she's not been an inside-only dog in
rescue, or is new to rescue, then its likely that she really hasn't had time
to settle in and feel secure therefore she's still wanting to go find
companionship. If she's not yet spayed and is coming into a heat cycle then
that could be another reason.

I'm not saying that fence-jumping is always fixable because the dog finds
the freedom to run and the many new sights & smells irresistable. Sometimes
though it is just a matter of giving the dog a good home where it gets
plenty of attention & affection so it won't want to leave. As to the
e-fence, it is definitely a solution to the fence-jumping/roaming *as long
as* you don't plan to keep her outside by herself. If its a matter of just
wanting something to contain her while you're out with her, so you don't
have to walk her on-lead, then it should be just fine. Another option is a
cable-run but again, it should be used only when you're home and can keep an
eye on her. The problem with lacking a physical barrier is that other dogs,
kids and adults can come into your yard and approach her. That's not
something you want to happen due to other animals being aggressive, children
sometimes being cruel & taunting, and adults out there who like to steal
purebred dogs.

--
Tara


  #4  
Old August 3rd 03, 02:31 PM
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In rec.pets.dogs.breeds THW wrote:
a will such a dog likely be hyper, and what is it like living with a
fence jumper? Will the dog outgrow fence jumping, and how do you visit
people and/or can you easily find dog-sitters/kennels that can deal with
this problem if you need to go away?


They don't outrgrow it and if you don't find a fence they can't jump it's
like if you leave your dog in the yard alone too long (long enough to get
bored) you'll find you have no dog (or a dog at your front door
eventually).

And, if you had our situation, where we had a fence jumper (actually I
think technically he tended to dig his way out rather than jump) who was
aggressive to other dogs, he ended up jumping our fence, jumping some
one else's fence, and getting a chunk of their dog's ear.

A fence jumper is annoying but if you are willing to put money i nto your
fence you can probably help prevent it. That's just my personal experience
(we had a fence jumper when I was growing up but my parents never really
put much effort into fixing the fence... we ended up you couldn't leave
him in the backyard for more than 30 minutes, maybe sometimes less, or
he'd decide he was bored wit the backyard and wanted to explore).

Alice

--
The root cause of problems is simple overpopulation. People just aren't
worth very much any more, and they know it. Makes 'em testy. ...Bev
|\ _,,,---,,_ Tigress
/,`.-'`' -. ;-;;,_ http://havoc.gtf.gatech.edu/tigress
|,4- ) )-,_..;\ ( `'-'
'---''(_/--' `-'\_) Cat by Felix Lee.
  #5  
Old August 3rd 03, 08:51 PM
Melissa S. Frye
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wrote in message
...


They don't outrgrow it and if you don't find a fence they can't jump it's
like if you leave your dog in the yard alone too long (long enough to get
bored) you'll find you have no dog (or a dog at your front door
eventually).


HAHA. That's about a minute and a half for Dice, who immeadiatly runs to
the front door. She is a 13.5" Cocker and the fence is 5 feet.
She is extremely athletic however. I am slowly getting rolls of cicken wire
around but haven't competely encircled the fence yet.

Dogs fence jump because they would rather be outside the fence than inside.

There are ways to stop fence jumping, either by solid fence+invisible fence
or hotwire, or rolls of poultry fencing at the top of the fence.

A fence jumper is annoying but if you are willing to put money i nto your
fence you can probably help prevent it. That's just my personal experience
(we had a fence jumper when I was growing up but my parents never really
put much effort into fixing the fence... we ended up you couldn't leave
him in the backyard for more than 30 minutes, maybe sometimes less, or
he'd decide he was bored wit the backyard and wanted to explore).

Best solution is prvention.

I have seen no corelation with hyperness.




Alice

--
Melissa S. Frye
Skyrocket cockers www.mfrye.com/skyrocket/



  #6  
Old August 3rd 03, 09:11 PM
Andrea
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"Melissa S. Frye" wrote
snip
Best solution is prvention.

I have seen no corelation with hyperness.


Agreed. My IH is a fence jumper, but pretty mellow. We just stopped leaving
her in the yard unsupervised. A dog that can leap 6' at a standstill isn't
going to be easily deterred.

FWIW, I think invisible fences are the worst invention ever. I hate them,
and the *only* use I see is if you have a dog who has little/no prey drive
at all & isn't territorial AND if you will be out with your dog, paying
attention to it whenever it's in the yard.

--
-Andrea Stone
Saorsa Basenjis
http://home1.gte.net/res0s12z/
The Trolls Nest - greenmen, goblins & gargoyle wall art
www.trollsnest.com


  #7  
Old August 7th 03, 12:20 PM
Lynn
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"Andrea" wrote in message
...
FWIW, I think invisible fences are the worst invention ever. I hate them,
and the *only* use I see is if you have a dog who has little/no prey drive
at all & isn't territorial AND if you will be out with your dog, paying
attention to it whenever it's in the yard.


I know this has and will be debated forever, but I have to disagree with
this. We have 2 GSD's who have been contained safely in our 1 acre yard for
6 years. One of them has a very high prey drive and both have killed an
occasional chipmunk, ground hog, raccoon that has wondered into the yard. I
have also seen them chase squirrels running at full speed and come to a
screeching halt right at the fence line. Every bikerider, walker, jogger
gets barked at and they have never gone over the fence line. It works great
for them. I realize it's not a perfect choice for everyone, but no fence
is. Each choice must be evaluated by the individual. To summarily dismiss
invisible fencing as a choice is not fair. Not for you and your dog...okay,
that's your choice, but it works great for us.

Lynn


  #8  
Old August 7th 03, 01:30 PM
shelly
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On Thu, 7 Aug 2003, Lynn wrote:

To summarily dismiss invisible fencing as a choice is not
fair. Not for you and your dog...okay, that's your choice,
but it works great for us.


my main objection to invisible fences is that they do not
protect your pets from outside dangers. because there is no
physical barrier, animals, children, etc. can easily enter
your yard while your dog is outside and could either harm your
dog or be harmed by your dog. it's not a chance i'm willing
to take, nor would i advise anyone else to risk it.

--
shelly (foul wench) and elliott and harriet
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
  #9  
Old August 7th 03, 03:05 PM
dianne marie schoenberg
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Lynn wrote:
Every bikerider, walker, jogger gets barked at and they have
never gone over the fence line. It works great for them.


Great for the dogs, maybe, but definitely not so great for
the bikers/joggers/etc. They've got no way to know that the
dogs are confined. And I hope that you realize that you have
some legal liability for injuries that are caused by your
method of confinement--for instance, if a biker sees two
German Shepherds rushing at him, swerves out into the road
to avoid them, and subsequently gets hit by a car--you could
be ponying up some VERY large bucks to settle the claim.

I have, in fact, seen invisible fences used to good
effect. But personally I do not allow my dogs to annoy
passersby no matter how the dogs are confined (in my
case, that would be voice, physical fence or house).

JFWIW,

Dianne

  #10  
Old August 7th 03, 04:19 PM
shelly
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On Thu, 7 Aug 2003, Mud E Poz wrote:

sadly, with the advent of no fence rules, it is often a
better choice than no fence/and therefore no dog. It can
work well, in back areas of homes, to boundary train dogs
that might otherwise be homeless. I don't care for them, but
like bark collars, find them in some cases a necessary evil.


i realize it's not a perfect world. in those cases, i would
recommend never leaving the dog outside by itself. the risk
to the dog is simply too great.

Then again, I do have an acre fenced. I won't live in one of
those convenant places


heh. ditto and ditto.

--
shelly (foul wench) and elliott and harriet
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
 




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