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cutting too much of a dogs nail



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 5th 05, 06:17 PM
Kyler Laird
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Default cutting too much of a dogs nail

Poseur writes:

The narrower cylinder, I presume (just in case he let's me get
close to him with the thing).


Just after I wrote my previous post in this thread I got inspired to work
on the long nails of a foster dog I just took in (temporarily) last night.
http://www.petfinder.com/pet.cgi?action=2&pet=5195528

Morgan is the largest dog we've had and he likes to use his teeth - he
"mouths" things but he's always very gentle. I figured trimming his nails
would be a good way to find out how much restraint he has.

Well, I learned that he doesn't like having his paws held and he was
pretty much terrified by the sound of the grinder. I ended up with him in
our walk-in shower, trying to make him comfortable. It wasn't going well.

I tried "fake grinding" his nails with the grinder off. That eventually
went alright. Then I tried running the grinder and then touching the
handle to his body, legs and paws. His paws were still sensitive but he
tolerated the rest, for the most part. I wanted to make sure that I did
not grind either of us while doing this so I finally removed the sanding
head. It was much quieter then. (This B&D model only has two speeds.)
He tolerated it even more.

Then I was able to put the collet up against his nails. I did that for
quite awhile and then I put the sanding head back on. He let me do his
dewclaws - no problemo. What a difference from the dance we were doing
at first! I did other nails that were off the floor because of the way
he was sitting but he wouldn't let me lift his paws to trim.

I wouldn't have been so tolerant of all of this resistance with my dogs.
I'm becoming "kinder and gentler" in my old age and having a dog this big
is especially good incentive to work *with* the dog! I like it.

BTW, although Morgan mouthed the grinder a few times and brushed against
me a couple times, he never showed anything close to agression in this
very stressful situation. What a great guy! Please tell me if you know
someone who would like a great dog like this. (I'm in Indiana but would
fly him anywhere around here.)

--kyler
  #2  
Old December 2nd 05, 04:17 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health,rec.pets.dogs.rescue
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Default cutting too much of a dogs nail

I posted in this thread awhile ago right after I first tried to grind
our latest foster dog's nails. Morgan is a big guy (for us).
http://www.petfinder.com/pet.cgi?action=2&pet=5195528
I don't want to coerce him to let me trim his nails. I'm not sure I
even could.

Our first attempt (as I described) got off to a rough start but
eventually ended in success. I tried again this morning, in the open
after trimming a couple other dogs' nails. He backed away from me
with great force (but with amazing gentleness).

I finally realized I had the grinder on the high speed setting like I
do with the other dogs. I switched it to low (as I had the first
time) and gave him some liver treats. He eventually tolerated some
grinding - even with me lifting his paws.

I did his front paws with lots of liver breaks. I didn't want to
spoil our progress but he was doing so well that I finally did his
back paws. He spun around on me a few times but he tolerated it. I
kept it light.

After I was done he was standing there wanting more so I went another
round! Gotta love those liver treats!

Both of our foster dogs and Gable, our PWD, are happy about nail
trimming now. Only Grazie avoids it but she'll tolerate it for me.

I've recommended grinding to friends for a long time. Now that I'm
getting better at it I'm even happier with it. I'm also seeing that
it's not limited to well-trained highly-controlled dogs; with enough
praise and treats it can work well for foster dogs.

--kyler
  #3  
Old December 8th 05, 10:21 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health,rec.pets.dogs.rescue
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Default cutting too much of a dogs nail

Never grind nails always trim them with profesional trimmers bought at
a reputable store or vetrinary supply house.

  #4  
Old December 9th 05, 12:22 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health,rec.pets.dogs.rescue
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Default cutting too much of a dogs nail

Nails are very important for the dental and orthopedic health of dogs
and puppies so it is prudent to cut them in graduated regular intervals.

  #6  
Old December 9th 05, 05:14 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health,rec.pets.dogs.rescue
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Default cutting too much of a dogs nail

A reputable store is one where they carry trhe good stuff like chains
and other needs of a real dog who is owned by his Master. Since only
good stores verses BAD stores where time is wasted as oposed to
Bzzzztuted by boredom with trivials and poor nail hygene.

 




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