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Hip Pain



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 13th 06, 01:35 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
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Default Hip Pain

are there any otc meds i can give an aging dog with hip pain


  #2  
Old February 14th 06, 03:23 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
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Default Hip Pain

Ascripton...a buffered aspirin I believe, but don't take my word for it;
ask a vet.



Fr8liner wrote:
are there any otc meds i can give an aging dog with hip pain




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  #3  
Old March 3rd 06, 10:12 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
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Default Hip Pain


"Scott" wrote in message
...
Ascripton...a buffered aspirin I believe, but don't take my word for it;
ask a vet.



Fr8liner wrote:
are there any otc meds i can give an aging dog with hip pain




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Aspirin will work well for pain in a dog, and I believe one tablet per
75-100 lbs would be about right, but do consult a vet as I am not for sure
on the dosage and too much aspirin is definitely not good for a dog. If the
pain is severe, that is, your dog is having trouble getting up, doing his
business, getting up or down steps, please see a vet. He will probably
recommend a steroid. Hip dysphasia affects around 10% of all dogs across
the board and is generated by inbreeding, but common arthritis may also be
the problem. As in humans, there isn't much you can do but try to make life
easier for your pet and dose him with pain meds.


  #4  
Old March 4th 06, 02:37 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
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Default Hip Pain

"wolfpuppy" said in rec.pets.dogs.health:

Hip dysphasia affects around 10% of all dogs across
the board and is generated by inbreeding, [...]


How so?

--
--Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
  #5  
Old March 4th 06, 04:14 PM
morgan4eva morgan4eva is offline
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First recorded activity by DogBanter: Nov 2005
Posts: 55
Exclamation

what kind of pain is it? my dog has hip dysplaicure and she becomes in pain sometimes. i give her 15ml of metacamn i used to give her 25ml but i have been given bad advice on giving to much so i cut her down and she is looking really well! 'NO PAIN!!!'
BUT DONT TAKE MY WORD FOR IT, ASK YOUR VET
__________________
SaShA**LoVe HeR NoT hAtE HeR.**
  #6  
Old March 4th 06, 07:07 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
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Default Hip Pain


"Rocky" wrote in message
...
"wolfpuppy" said in rec.pets.dogs.health:

Hip dysphasia affects around 10% of all dogs across
the board and is generated by inbreeding, [...]


How so?

--
--Matt. Rocky's a Dog.


Hip dysphasia is the condition when the socket of the hip is too shallow for
the ball of the femur. When a dog is young, it is not as noticeable because
the musculature is strong enough to keep the socket in place. As the dog
ages, and the muscles and tendons weaken and stretch, the ball end of the
femur will want to come out and this is what causes the severe pain. There
isn't too much that can be done for this condition.

Hip dysphasia is caused by inbreeding, that is, breeding too close to the
blood. Breeding littermates, for example. This is a condition that affects
all breeds across the board at about 10%. I found out this info years ago
when I wanted to educate myself on this condition, for I had been told for
so long that this was a trait associated with german shepherds primarily.
I've since learned that this is not so, but is fairly equally distributed
among all breeds. In other words, a disreputable breeder, instead of
introducing new stock into his dogs, will cheat and breed males and females
that are too closely related to save a buck. This is a very good reason for
checking out your breeder very carefully before purchasing.


  #7  
Old March 4th 06, 07:40 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
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Default Hip Pain

"wolfpuppy" said in rec.pets.dogs.health:

Hip dysphasia is [...]


I know what his dysplasia is, I was interested in your reasoning
that it's "generated by inbreeding."

Hip dysphasia is caused by inbreeding, that is, breeding
too close to the blood. Breeding littermates, for example.


I also know what inbreeding is.

This is a condition that affects all breeds across the
board at about 10%.


Where'd this number come from?

I found out this info years ago when I
wanted to educate myself on this condition, for I had been
told for so long that this was a trait associated with
german shepherds primarily.


Many breeds have an unfortunate number of dysplastic dogs, not
just GSDs. Also unfortunate are the mixed breeds which "get"
the same thing.

I've since learned that this is
not so, but is fairly equally distributed among all breeds.


Yup.

In other words, a disreputable breeder, instead of
introducing new stock into his dogs, will cheat and breed
males and females that are too closely related to save a
buck.


Yup.

This is a very good reason for checking out your
breeder very carefully before purchasing.


Of course.

But you haven't addressed my query as to your assertion that hip
dysplasia is *generated* by inbreeding. For example, if I were
to hypothetically take a GSD female, rated OFA Excellent, and
breed her to her litter brother, also rated OFA Excellent, would
I get dysplastic puppies?

My answer is: Maybe. Not: Yes, they're inbred.

--
--Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
  #8  
Old March 4th 06, 07:46 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
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Default Hip Pain

In article ,
Rocky wrote:
"wolfpuppy" said in rec.pets.dogs.health:
I've since learned that this is
not so, but is fairly equally distributed among all breeds.

Yup.


Either I'm misunderstanding what's being asserted or I think
you've made a think-o. I know you know that the incidence
of hip dysplasia isn't equally distributed among breeds.

"Wolfpuppy": check the OFA stats. Also, read "Control of
Canine Genetic Disease" by George Padgett.
--
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis -

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community.
  #9  
Old March 4th 06, 08:12 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
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Default Hip Pain

On Sat, 4 Mar 2006 14:07:15 -0500, "wolfpuppy"
wrote:


"Rocky" wrote in message
...
"wolfpuppy" said in rec.pets.dogs.health:

Hip dysphasia affects around 10% of all dogs across
the board and is generated by inbreeding, [...]


How so?

--
--Matt. Rocky's a Dog.


Hip dysphasia is the condition when the socket of the hip is too shallow for
the ball of the femur. When a dog is young, it is not as noticeable because
the musculature is strong enough to keep the socket in place. As the dog
ages, and the muscles and tendons weaken and stretch, the ball end of the
femur will want to come out and this is what causes the severe pain. There
isn't too much that can be done for this condition.

Hip dysphasia is caused by inbreeding, that is, breeding too close to the
blood. Breeding littermates, for example. This is a condition that affects
all breeds across the board at about 10%. I found out this info years ago
when I wanted to educate myself on this condition, for I had been told for
so long that this was a trait associated with german shepherds primarily.
I've since learned that this is not so, but is fairly equally distributed
among all breeds. In other words, a disreputable breeder, instead of
introducing new stock into his dogs, will cheat and breed males and females
that are too closely related to save a buck. This is a very good reason for
checking out your breeder very carefully before purchasing.


There is actually no such thing as hip dysphasia. Dysplasia, yes.
And it's not *caused* by breeding to close to the blood, whatever that
means.

Mustang Sally

  #10  
Old March 4th 06, 08:21 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
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Default Hip Pain

(Melinda Shore) said in rec.pets.dogs.health:

Yup.


Either I'm misunderstanding what's being asserted or I think
you've made a think-o. I know you know that the incidence
of hip dysplasia isn't equally distributed among breeds.


I reread that part before I posted it, wasn't positive, so gave
wolfpuppy the benefit of the doubt.

To be honest, what was going through my mind at the time was
that some severe HD-prone breeds have improved statistically and
others have not. So, maybe it was really a think-o. No matter,
mea culpa.

On that note, and to turn this thread to something in which I'm
interested in learning regarding HD, I had a disgreement with a
soon-to-be-vet friend regarding HD improvement of specific
breeds. He asserts that OFA stats are easily manipulated by
breeders only submitting good results. I contend that, to a
certain degree, some (usually less popular) breeds are self-
policing.

Siberian Huskies are one. They have a particularly high
incidence of testing, especially since I suspect they're no
where near as popular a pet dog as Labs, GRs, and GSDs.

Sibes own (according to offa.org), the fifth postion in HD, with
an high number of reports. I'm not sure how to interpret the
trend numbers.

So. Can breeders and owners affect the OFA's percentages? I
tend to believe the best and say no - they couldn't and probably
wouldn't.

--
--Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
 




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