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stomach stapling for dogs?



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 16th 06, 03:16 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
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Default stomach stapling for dogs?

At Cali's intermediate obedience class today, one of the other dog's owner
mentioned that her vet recommended stomach stapling for her dog. She said
that it would be to help prevent the dog's stomach from turning over or
something to that effect. I have never heard of this. She also mentioned
it tends to be a large breed thing so that's probably why I never heard of
it. She said it was the first time she ever heard of it either so she was
looking for info and such. Anyone else heard of it and have any good info
that I can pass on to her. Thanks.


  #2  
Old February 16th 06, 03:48 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
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Posts: n/a
Default stomach stapling for dogs?

"MauiJNP" wrote in message
...
At Cali's intermediate obedience class today, one of the other dog's owner
mentioned that her vet recommended stomach stapling for her dog. She said
that it would be to help prevent the dog's stomach from turning over or
something to that effect. I have never heard of this. She also mentioned
it tends to be a large breed thing so that's probably why I never heard of
it. She said it was the first time she ever heard of it either so she was
looking for info and such. Anyone else heard of it and have any good info
that I can pass on to her. Thanks.


Have her look up "bloat" or "GDV" (gastric dilatation and volvulus) for more
information.

http://www.canismajor.com/dog/bloat.html

The physiology of bloat
Torsion or volvulus are terms to describe the twisting of the stomach after
gastric distention occurs. The different terms are used to define the
twisting whether it occurs on the longitudinal axis (torsion) or the
mesenteric axis (volvulus). Most people use the terms interchangeably, and
the type of twist has no bearing on the prognosis or treatment. When torsion
occurs, the esophagus is closed off, limiting the dog's ability to relieve
distention by vomiting or belching. Often the spleen becomes entrapped as
well, and its blood supply is cut off.

Now a complex chain of physiologic events begins. The blood return to the
heart decreases, cardiac output decreases, and cardiac arrythmias may
follow. Toxins build up in the dying stomach lining. The liver, pancreas,
and upper small bowel may also be compromised. Shock from low blood pressure
and endotoxins rapidly develops. Sometimes the stomach ruptures, leading to
peritonitis.

Abdominal distention, salivating, and retching are the hallmark signs of
GDV. Other signs may include restlessness, depression, lethargy, anorexia,
weakness, or a rapid heart rate.

Treatment
GDV is a true emergency. If you know or even suspect your dog has bloat,
immediately call your veterinarian or emergency service. Do not attempt home
treatment.

Do take the time to call ahead.; while you are transporting the dog, the
hospital staff can prepare for your arrival. Do not insist on accompanying
your dog to the treatment area. Well-meaning owners are an impediment to
efficient care. Someone will be out to answer your questions as soon as
possible, but for now, have faith in you veterinarian and wait.

Initial diagnosis may include x-rays, an ECG, and blood tests, but treatment
will probably be started before the test results are in.

The first step is to treat shock with IV fluids and steroids. Antibiotics
and anti-arrythmics may also be started now. Then the veterinarian will
attempt to decompress the stomach by passing a stomach tube. If this is
successful, a gastric levage may be instituted to wash out accumulated food,
gastric juices, or other stomach contents. In some cases, decompression is
accomplished by placing large-bore needles or a trochar through the skin and
muscle and directly into the stomach.

In some cases, this medical therapy is sufficient. However, in many cases,
surgery is required to save the dog. Once the dog's condition is stabilized,
surgery to correct the stomach twist, remove any unhealthy tissue, and
anchor the stomach in place is performed. The gastroplexy, or anchoring
surgery, is an important procedure to prevent recurrence, and many
variations exist. Your veterinarian will do the procedure he feels
comfortable with and which has the best success rate

Recovery is prolonged, sometimes requiring hospital stays of a week or more.
Post-operative care depends on the severity of the disease and the treatment
methods employed and may include a special diet, drugs to promote gastric
emptying, and routine wound management. Costs may run $500-1000 or more in
complicated cases.


  #3  
Old February 16th 06, 03:49 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default stomach stapling for dogs?

The gastroplexy, or anchoring surgery is often done to prevent an
reoccurrence of torsion...Type "canine torsion" in Google for more info than
you could ever need...GG

"MauiJNP" wrote in message
...
At Cali's intermediate obedience class today, one of the other dog's owner
mentioned that her vet recommended stomach stapling for her dog. She said
that it would be to help prevent the dog's stomach from turning over or
something to that effect. I have never heard of this. She also mentioned
it tends to be a large breed thing so that's probably why I never heard of
it. She said it was the first time she ever heard of it either so she was
looking for info and such. Anyone else heard of it and have any good info
that I can pass on to her. Thanks.



  #4  
Old February 16th 06, 04:16 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default stomach stapling for dogs?

At Cali's intermediate obedience class today, one of the other dog's owner
mentioned that her vet recommended stomach stapling for her dog. She said
that it would be to help prevent the dog's stomach from turning over or
something to that effect. I have never heard of this. She also mentioned
it tends to be a large breed thing so that's probably why I never heard of
it. She said it was the first time she ever heard of it either so she was
looking for info and such. Anyone else heard of it and have any good info
that I can pass on to her. Thanks.


Certain dogs with deep chests, such as dobermans and great danes, are more
prone to gastric torsion than other dogs. Think of a plastic bag with air in
it and twisted shut at both ends. When a stomach flips like this in a dog
the stomach contents "ferment" causing the gas to bloat the stomach. The
twist in the gut area ceases blood flow to the tissue and quickly kills the
intestines. Anyone who has been present for a torsion surgery knows the
smell of the gas and dead tissue is horrid. Tacking the stomach to the wall
prevents the torsion from happening. Sometimes it's done preventively, but
usually after an episode has occurred.

-Sharon


  #5  
Old February 16th 06, 03:06 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default stomach stapling for dogs?


"MauiJNP" wrote in message:

At Cali's intermediate obedience class today, one of the other dog's owner
mentioned that her vet recommended stomach stapling for her dog.


What kind of dog does she have? As others have mentioned, this is primarily
a problem of the large, deep chested dogs. Dane people recommend doing the
belt-loop procedure, which apparently has less likelihood of coming undone.
Mind you, dogs can still bloat after the procedure, but without the torsion,
it causes less damage, and buys you precious time in getting the dog to the
vet.

Suja


  #6  
Old February 17th 06, 10:12 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default stomach stapling for dogs?


At Cali's intermediate obedience class today, one of the other dog's
owner
mentioned that her vet recommended stomach stapling for her dog.


What kind of dog does she have? As others have mentioned, this is
primarily
a problem of the large, deep chested dogs. Dane people recommend doing
the
belt-loop procedure, which apparently has less likelihood of coming
undone.
Mind you, dogs can still bloat after the procedure, but without the
torsion,
it causes less damage, and buys you precious time in getting the dog to
the
vet.



She has a Newfoundland.


  #7  
Old February 17th 06, 10:14 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default stomach stapling for dogs?


Certain dogs with deep chests, such as dobermans and great danes, are more
prone to gastric torsion than other dogs. Think of a plastic bag with air
in it and twisted shut at both ends. When a stomach flips like this in a
dog the stomach contents "ferment" causing the gas to bloat the stomach.
The twist in the gut area ceases blood flow to the tissue and quickly
kills the intestines.



yikes, that doesn't sound fun at all.





  #8  
Old February 17th 06, 10:15 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default stomach stapling for dogs?


The gastroplexy, or anchoring surgery is often done to prevent an
reoccurrence of torsion...Type "canine torsion" in Google for more info
than you could ever need...GG


great, I will let her know


  #9  
Old February 17th 06, 10:16 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default stomach stapling for dogs?


Have her look up "bloat" or "GDV" (gastric dilatation and volvulus) for
more information.

http://www.canismajor.com/dog/bloat.html

The physiology of bloat
Torsion or volvulus are terms to describe the twisting of the stomach
after gastric distention occurs. The different terms are used to define
the twisting whether it occurs on the longitudinal axis (torsion) or the
mesenteric axis (volvulus). Most people use the terms interchangeably, and
the type of twist has no bearing on the prognosis or treatment. When
torsion occurs, the esophagus is closed off, limiting the dog's ability to
relieve distention by vomiting or belching. Often the spleen becomes
entrapped as well, and its blood supply is cut off.

Now a complex chain of physiologic events begins. The blood return to the
heart decreases, cardiac output decreases, and cardiac arrythmias may
follow. Toxins build up in the dying stomach lining. The liver, pancreas,
and upper small bowel may also be compromised. Shock from low blood
pressure and endotoxins rapidly develops. Sometimes the stomach ruptures,
leading to peritonitis.

Abdominal distention, salivating, and retching are the hallmark signs of
GDV. Other signs may include restlessness, depression, lethargy, anorexia,
weakness, or a rapid heart rate.

Treatment
GDV is a true emergency. If you know or even suspect your dog has bloat,
immediately call your veterinarian or emergency service. Do not attempt
home treatment.

Do take the time to call ahead.; while you are transporting the dog, the
hospital staff can prepare for your arrival. Do not insist on accompanying
your dog to the treatment area. Well-meaning owners are an impediment to
efficient care. Someone will be out to answer your questions as soon as
possible, but for now, have faith in you veterinarian and wait.

Initial diagnosis may include x-rays, an ECG, and blood tests, but
treatment will probably be started before the test results are in.

The first step is to treat shock with IV fluids and steroids. Antibiotics
and anti-arrythmics may also be started now. Then the veterinarian will
attempt to decompress the stomach by passing a stomach tube. If this is
successful, a gastric levage may be instituted to wash out accumulated
food, gastric juices, or other stomach contents. In some cases,
decompression is accomplished by placing large-bore needles or a trochar
through the skin and muscle and directly into the stomach.

In some cases, this medical therapy is sufficient. However, in many cases,
surgery is required to save the dog. Once the dog's condition is
stabilized, surgery to correct the stomach twist, remove any unhealthy
tissue, and anchor the stomach in place is performed. The gastroplexy, or
anchoring surgery, is an important procedure to prevent recurrence, and
many variations exist. Your veterinarian will do the procedure he feels
comfortable with and which has the best success rate

Recovery is prolonged, sometimes requiring hospital stays of a week or
more. Post-operative care depends on the severity of the disease and the
treatment methods employed and may include a special diet, drugs to
promote gastric emptying, and routine wound management. Costs may run
$500-1000 or more in complicated cases.




wow, great info! I will pass it on.


 




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