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Curing problems with rescue dogs



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 14th 03, 04:36 PM
Tara O.
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Default Curing problems with rescue dogs

"THW" wrote in message
...
We're considering adopting a dog from rescue, and we're finding (not
surprisingly) that just about all dogs that are available have one or more
problems. I'm wondering what people's experience is in dealing with
problems like:

1. housebreaking (if we know that the dog is clean in the crate, but

having
a few accidents within first week at a foster home)


Accidents in a new home are normal and not a behavioral or training issue.
The dog doesn't know where to go or how to tell the new people he/she needs
to go out. The new people don't know the dog's habits so may not be
offering to take him/her out as often as needed. Its just an adjustment
period thing. If it continues for more than a week, on a frequent basis,
then I'd call it either a housetraining issue or an infection in the urinary
tract or bladder.

2. car sickness (severe drooling and stress)


This is a fairly normal thing. Even if you bought a puppy from a breeder,
there's every chance that it may not be a great traveler either. If you do
alot of traveling and have plans to take the dog with you then there are
medications such as dramamine that are made for car sickness/anxiety.


3. jumping up (the dog is going up on hind legs and wrapping legs around
your waist...foster doesn't think it is aggressive/dominance thing, rather
wants attention). The dog is about 40 pounds.


Its not generally an aggressive or dominant gesture at all. Its a lack of
training which is easily remedied.


Also, how long can it take for the hormones of a spayed female to settle
down?


1-3 months for the hormones to completely leave the body. If you're looking
for a behavioral change such as going from very energetic to
not-so-energetic then you're banking on the wrong remedy. The only thing
that will permanently affect a dog's energy level is age.


The dogs we're looking at are, for the most part, 1 to 2 years old.

Thanks
very much.


Then you are looking at puppies in big-dog bodies...adolescents. They need
obedience training, patience and plenty of exercise. The lack of training
in rescue dogs is pretty prominent which is one of the reasons the original
owners don't want the dog anymore. Even if you'd raised a dog this age from
puppyhood, you'd still need to keep up with the training due to this age
window. Its a prime time for well-behaved, trained dogs to suddenly lose
their brains and is often referred to as the terrible teens or terrible twos
because they are going through a major transition from baby to adult. Its a
time when they'll test your patience and their limits just to see what
happens.


--
Tara


  #2  
Old August 14th 03, 08:22 PM
Suja
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THW wrote:

We're considering adopting a dog from rescue, and we're finding (not
surprisingly) that just about all dogs that are available have one or more
problems.


None of what you have outlined below are problems only found in rescue
dogs. A couple of these are definite training issues, and a lot of the
time, a dog gets dumped because the owners didn't do their home work and
didn't bother to train.

1. housebreaking (if we know that the dog is clean in the crate, but having
a few accidents within first week at a foster home)


http://www.ddfl.org/behavior/re_housetraining.htm

2. car sickness (severe drooling and stress)


http://www.delcospca.org/carsick.html

3. jumping up (the dog is going up on hind legs and wrapping legs around
your waist...foster doesn't think it is aggressive/dominance thing, rather
wants attention). The dog is about 40 pounds.


http://www.allsands.com/Pets/Dogs/do...tra_sec_gn.htm

Suja

  #3  
Old August 15th 03, 12:58 AM
culprit
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Default


"THW" wrote in message
...
We're considering adopting a dog from rescue, and we're finding (not
surprisingly) that just about all dogs that are available have one or more
problems. I'm wondering what people's experience is in dealing with
problems like:

1. housebreaking (if we know that the dog is clean in the crate, but

having
a few accidents within first week at a foster home)
2. car sickness (severe drooling and stress)
3. jumping up (the dog is going up on hind legs and wrapping legs around
your waist...foster doesn't think it is aggressive/dominance thing, rather
wants attention). The dog is about 40 pounds.


FYI- i think all dogs have one or more "problems", it's just that with
rescue dogs, you know their issues up front.

-kelly


  #4  
Old August 15th 03, 07:52 AM
external usenet poster
 
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Default

In rec.pets.dogs.breeds THW wrote:
We're considering adopting a dog from rescue, and we're finding (not
surprisingly) that just about all dogs that are available have one or more
problems. I'm wondering what people's experience is in dealing with
problems like:


These are typical problems of the adolescent dog, even one that you raised
to be perfectly well mannered as a puppy. Testing the boundaries and
limits is what an adolescent does. The things you describe are worked
through with consistency, patience, and a bit of time. On rare occasions
the car sickness may continue and in that case medication can help.
Usually, though, the prblem is a combination of physical immaturity and
anxiety, both of which are resolvabable.

Diane Blackman
  #5  
Old August 15th 03, 02:04 PM
Dimpled Chad
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On 15 Aug 2003, Bichon.ca opined:

Rescue dogs can have more then just typical
problems of the adolescent dog.


Any dog randomly selected 'can have more than just typical problems of the
adolescent dog,' including those bred at bichon.ca.....

Chad

--
Looking for a pet? Adopt one! ** http://www.petfinder.com
Info for a healthy, happy dog? * http://www.dog-play.com

Heh. Misinformation worse than no information, said the King of
Misinformation.....





  #6  
Old August 15th 03, 03:00 PM
Mary Healey
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Default

Bichon.ca wrote:
Your comments are at best a shot in the dark Diane, more so when you
have no idea of the dogs history.


When you have no idea of the dog's history, it's simplest to proceed as
if the animal has a similar history to other dogs its age. In addition,
the OP listed "problems" that, to most experienced dog owners, are more
temporary annoyances than deep-seated difficulties.

Rescue dogs can have more then just typical
problems of the adolescent dog.


They can also have fewer problems. What was that about a shot in the
dark?

On 15 Aug 2003 06:52:49 GMT, wrote:
These are typical problems of the adolescent dog, even one that you raised
to be perfectly well mannered as a puppy. Testing the boundaries and
limits is what an adolescent does. The things you describe are worked
through with consistency, patience, and a bit of time. On rare occasions
the car sickness may continue and in that case medication can help.
Usually, though, the prblem is a combination of physical immaturity and
anxiety, both of which are resolvabable.


--
Mary H. and the Ames National Zoo: Regis, Sam-I-Am, Noah (1992-2001),
Ranger, Duke,
felines, and finches

  #7  
Old August 15th 03, 03:29 PM
Dimpled Chad
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Default

On 15 Aug 2003, Bichon.ca opined:

"Any dog" is a more appropriate reply dim pled Chad.


No, I don't believe so. I phrased it that way on purpose.


As for http://Bichon.ca/ puppies their history is know and their
parents history is know and the grand parents history and so on is
know.


I do not understand what you are trying to say here.

I will assume you to mean 'known' in each instance of 'know' above, which
would convey some meaning such as "the puppies at bichon.ca have traceable
histories". Fair enough.

Your point, nonetheless, is vague and misleading. Yes, rescue dogs "can" have
more than just typical problems of the [average] adolescent dog. But they
also "can" have fewer such problems, and dogs purchased at a breeder, where
the history is known, *may* still yield "more than just typical" problems,
whatever that means.

As a matter of fact, rescue dogs come from a variety of sources for a variety
of reasons, including from breeders who know very well their history and
their parent's history and their grandparent's history and so on.

Is it better to know history and temperment: yes, absolutely. Is it best for
a breeder to care enough about their dogs that they place *careful* scrutiny
on their breeding practices and thus engage in responsible breeding: YES!

Does that mean that rescue dogs are *more* likely to be worse dogs: no. For
you to suggest otherwise is unfortunate and an example of misinformation.

Chad


--
Looking for a pet? Adopt one! ** http://www.petfinder.com
Info for a healthy, happy dog? * http://www.dog-play.com


In cases of defense ‘tis best to weigh The enemy
more mighty than he seems. -- Wm. Shakespeare





  #8  
Old August 15th 03, 03:52 PM
dianne marie schoenberg
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Default

Bichon.ca wrote:
Your comments are at best a shot in the dark Diane, more so when you
have no idea of the dogs history. Misinformation can be more damaging
then no information Diane. Rescue dogs can have more then just typical
problems of the adolescent dog.


And the experience you base this opinion on is--?

In my case, I fostered rescue dogs regularly for 10 years
(mostly large breeds, only one small dog). Most of the dogs
I agreed to take sight unseen without pre-screening them
for behavior issues. In all that time I had one that had
problems due to lack of previous socialization, and one
that had aggression problems (she was returned to the
shelter, not placed). The remainder were all very normal
dogs suffering from no more than lack of training and--in
the case of the adolescents--normal behavior for their age.

I'm sure that none of the *smirk* high-quality puppies
from your accidental litters would ever suffer such
problems :-).

Dianne



  #9  
Old August 15th 03, 04:52 PM
Bichon.ca
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Default

Interesting you say "simplest to proceed", agreed it would be easy to
use your simplistic method. The simplest being the best for who you
and not the dog?

Not knowing how the dog has been treated in the past leaves you and
the dog open to making things worst. Your "simplest to proceed" method
is is far from the best for the dog.

http://Bichon.ca/


On Fri, 15 Aug 2003 09:00:27 -0500, Mary Healey
wrote:

Bichon.ca wrote:
Your comments are at best a shot in the dark Diane, more so when you
have no idea of the dogs history.


When you have no idea of the dog's history, it's simplest to proceed as
if the animal has a similar history to other dogs its age.

  #10  
Old August 15th 03, 04:56 PM
Bichon.ca
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Default

Agreed.

http://Bichon.ca/


On Fri, 15 Aug 2003 10:52:22 -0400, Suja wrote:

As for whether dogs in rescue can have more than your typical adolescent
dog problem, they may, they may not.

Suja


 




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