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Need help with my Dachshunds



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 7th 06, 01:59 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
silberj
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Need help with my Dachshunds

I have crossposted this in the behaviour group, so please don't think
I'm trying to spam, just need a little help.

I have 4 beautiful dachshunds, 1 spayed older female, 1 male just under

a year, 1 female that is 9 mos, and we just got a male about 1 year old

from a home who couldn't take care of him. The new one is the problem.
He has been shuffled from home to home and is adorable, but I need some

advice. My other 3 are kennel trained. Please let me know if my
treatment can be improved or changed, I'm not experienced in having so
many inside dogs. The "new" one is obviously very intimidated by the
other 3, and of course the males are now trying to "outmark" each
other, all in my house. I know housebreaking this breed can be very
trying, but I'm willing to take care of this pet that has been shuffled

around. What can I do to keep these males from marking all over my
house and furniture, and fighting with each other? I am willing to get
the new one fixed, although I don't think that will solve the problem.
My other male is registered and would like to put him up for stud, so
neutering him is not really an option at this point. I really love them

all and realize I may have gotten in over my head so any help or advice

would be extremeley appreciated. Please don't flame me, I need help,
not told what a dumbass I am for having so many. Thanks in advance.

John

  #2  
Old July 7th 06, 02:33 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
TaraG
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 503
Default Need help with my Dachshunds


"silberj" wrote in message
ups.com...
I have crossposted this in the behaviour group, so please don't think
I'm trying to spam, just need a little help.

I have 4 beautiful dachshunds, 1 spayed older female, 1 male just under

a year, 1 female that is 9 mos, and we just got a male about 1 year old

from a home who couldn't take care of him. The new one is the problem.
He has been shuffled from home to home and is adorable, but I need some

advice. My other 3 are kennel trained. Please let me know if my
treatment can be improved or changed, I'm not experienced in having so
many inside dogs. The "new" one is obviously very intimidated by the
other 3, and of course the males are now trying to "outmark" each
other, all in my house. I know housebreaking this breed can be very
trying, but I'm willing to take care of this pet that has been shuffled


Is the new one kennel trained as well? If not, I'd start introducing him to
crate training right away. Since the problem is actually with *all* of your
males, I'd go back to crate training all of your dogs at this point. Sort of
like a "do over", but for housebreaking.

around. What can I do to keep these males from marking all over my
house and furniture, and fighting with each other?


Honestly, it sounds as though you've got a lot more going on than just a
housebreaking issue. I would sign up for some obedience training classes
pronto. You will likely have to take each dog seperately. Since that would
be a real hardship to do with all four dogs, I would pick the two biggest
problems and take them to classes, then I would apply the lessons from class
to all the dogs at home. This is as much a behavior thing as it is a marking
thing.

I am willing to get
the new one fixed, although I don't think that will solve the problem.


It may not solve the problem entirely, but it will probably help....and at
this point, you need to do anything that will help. I would neuter all your
males at this point, but more on that in a moment.

My other male is registered and would like to put him up for stud, so
neutering him is not really an option at this point.


Of course its an option. Please please please read this page on responsible
breeding practices http://www.dogplay.com/Breeding/responsibility2.htm

Being registered is nowhere near enough of a reason to breed a dog. In fact,
its the barest minimum of proof that a dog is even the breed that someone
says he is....and that is just insufficient reason for deciding to pass on
his genes- and his potential health issues- to other generations. No one who
has spent the time and money trial, show, work, and genetic health screen
their female is going to want to use an untested, and unproven stud. This
means that the really healthy, temperamentally sound and structurally solid
females won't even be available to mate with your dog. This leaves the other
untested, unproven (temperamentally and structurally) females who are also
bringing unknown genetic problems to the table (as would your stud,
unfortunately). Dachshunds have some very serious health issues, and if
you're not actively involved in screening them out of your lines, then
you're likely just breeding them into the next generation.

Please reconsider this. This is a very big deal.

I really love them
all and realize I may have gotten in over my head so any help or advice


1) Neuter and spay all of your dogs.
2) Sign up for a good training class with at least one of (preferably two
of) your dogs.

would be extremeley appreciated. Please don't flame me, I need help,
not told what a dumbass I am for having so many. Thanks in advance.


I'm not going to flame you for having too many (you already have to deal
with that everyday by trying to juggle all those Doxies), but the breeding
thing might put you in hot water around these parts. This is a rescue group.
Basically, the number one reason rescues even have to exist is because of
the breeders who know nothing about responsible breeding practices and want
to breed their pets. Big problem. Bigger even than puppy mills when it comes
to the numbers of dogs produced that way. I'm not at al against breeding, or
against purebreed dogs. But I *am* vehemently against irresponsible
breeding. You are clearly not in a position to breed your dog responsibly,
so please just don't breed him.

Tara


  #3  
Old July 7th 06, 03:15 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
silberj
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Need help with my Dachshunds


TaraG wrote:
"silberj" wrote in message
ups.com...
I have crossposted this in the behaviour group, so please don't think
I'm trying to spam, just need a little help.

I have 4 beautiful dachshunds, 1 spayed older female, 1 male just under

a year, 1 female that is 9 mos, and we just got a male about 1 year old

from a home who couldn't take care of him. The new one is the problem.
He has been shuffled from home to home and is adorable, but I need some

advice. My other 3 are kennel trained. Please let me know if my
treatment can be improved or changed, I'm not experienced in having so
many inside dogs. The "new" one is obviously very intimidated by the
other 3, and of course the males are now trying to "outmark" each
other, all in my house. I know housebreaking this breed can be very
trying, but I'm willing to take care of this pet that has been shuffled


Is the new one kennel trained as well? If not, I'd start introducing him to
crate training right away. Since the problem is actually with *all* of your
males, I'd go back to crate training all of your dogs at this point. Sort of
like a "do over", but for housebreaking.

around. What can I do to keep these males from marking all over my
house and furniture, and fighting with each other?


Honestly, it sounds as though you've got a lot more going on than just a
housebreaking issue. I would sign up for some obedience training classes
pronto. You will likely have to take each dog seperately. Since that would
be a real hardship to do with all four dogs, I would pick the two biggest
problems and take them to classes, then I would apply the lessons from class
to all the dogs at home. This is as much a behavior thing as it is a marking
thing.

I am willing to get
the new one fixed, although I don't think that will solve the problem.


It may not solve the problem entirely, but it will probably help....and at
this point, you need to do anything that will help. I would neuter all your
males at this point, but more on that in a moment.

My other male is registered and would like to put him up for stud, so
neutering him is not really an option at this point.


Of course its an option. Please please please read this page on responsible
breeding practices http://www.dogplay.com/Breeding/responsibility2.htm

Being registered is nowhere near enough of a reason to breed a dog. In fact,
its the barest minimum of proof that a dog is even the breed that someone
says he is....and that is just insufficient reason for deciding to pass on
his genes- and his potential health issues- to other generations. No one who
has spent the time and money trial, show, work, and genetic health screen
their female is going to want to use an untested, and unproven stud. This
means that the really healthy, temperamentally sound and structurally solid
females won't even be available to mate with your dog. This leaves the other
untested, unproven (temperamentally and structurally) females who are also
bringing unknown genetic problems to the table (as would your stud,
unfortunately). Dachshunds have some very serious health issues, and if
you're not actively involved in screening them out of your lines, then
you're likely just breeding them into the next generation.

Please reconsider this. This is a very big deal.

I really love them
all and realize I may have gotten in over my head so any help or advice


1) Neuter and spay all of your dogs.
2) Sign up for a good training class with at least one of (preferably two
of) your dogs.

would be extremeley appreciated. Please don't flame me, I need help,
not told what a dumbass I am for having so many. Thanks in advance.


I'm not going to flame you for having too many (you already have to deal
with that everyday by trying to juggle all those Doxies), but the breeding
thing might put you in hot water around these parts. This is a rescue group.
Basically, the number one reason rescues even have to exist is because of
the breeders who know nothing about responsible breeding practices and want
to breed their pets. Big problem. Bigger even than puppy mills when it comes
to the numbers of dogs produced that way. I'm not at al against breeding, or
against purebreed dogs. But I *am* vehemently against irresponsible
breeding. You are clearly not in a position to breed your dog responsibly,
so please just don't breed him.

Tara


Thanks for your advice, but I think I may have misrepresented what I
meant. When I said putting him up for stud, I didn't mean to infer that
I was going to stud him out. I definitely am not a a puppy mill, and
honestly these are the first registered dogs I have ever owned. Every
pet I have ever owned in my 39 years has come from a shelter. I would
possibly like to breed the male (not the new one I just got) and the
female, however this is not a critical issue. Sorry if I didn't clarify
that enough. I do plan on getting educated on the responsibility aspect
and your input is certainly appreciated. Thanks again, I'll try to
follow your advice and see how that turns out, wish me luck.

John

  #4  
Old July 7th 06, 05:10 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
TaraG
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 503
Default Need help with my Dachshunds


"silberj" wrote in message
ups.com...

Thanks for your advice,


You're welcome :-)

but I think I may have misrepresented what I
meant. When I said putting him up for stud, I didn't mean to infer that
I was going to stud him out.


Whether you stud him "out" to others, or stud him to a dog you already own,
it is the exact same thing.

I definitely am not a a puppy mill,


I never said you were. Sounds more like you are thinking about becoming what
is known as a Backyard Breeder. My point was that while puppy mills are
horrible for the well being of individual dogs, Backyard Breeders are
actually really horroble for the well being of dogs overall. The people who
only breed their dogs once or twice (and therefor don't think they're
contributing much to the overpopulation problem) are actually the *biggest*
producers of puppies in the US. On a case by case basis, they don't seem to
be creatinbg that many dogs, but when added together, Backyard Breeders
create more puppies than all the Puppy Mills put together.

and
honestly these are the first registered dogs I have ever owned.


Which, honestly, is an even stronger argument against you breeding them. It
takes *years* of learning and research to understand what goes into careful
and responsible breeding of a certain breed. Years spent learning, and then
quite a bit of time searching for the dog that might be a good prospect for
breeding, and then even more time trialing and training to make sure the pup
is more than just potential, but a real example of what that breed should be
in terms of both health *and* temperament. Its astronomically unlikely that
*one* of the first purebreed dogs you've ever owned happens to meet the
criteria for a responsible breeding...let alone two of them.

Every
pet I have ever owned in my 39 years has come from a shelter.


That's awesome. Really.
But why undo all that good by breeding even one irresponsible litter?

I would
possibly like to breed the male (not the new one I just got) and the
female, however this is not a critical issue.


Again, I have to say that this is a very very bad idea. There is no shortage
of irresponsibly bred Dachshunds. Doxie rescue is, in fact, looking for
homes for the ones they already have every day.

Sorry if I didn't clarify
that enough.


No, you did. I knew what you meant. I know your intentions aren't
necessarily bad, but I don't think you are aware or informed enough about
how much damage you would be contributing to the already existing
irresponsible breeding crisis.

I do plan on getting educated on the responsibility aspect
and your input is certainly appreciated. Thanks again, I'll try to
follow your advice and see how that turns out, wish me luck.


Please carefully the page that I provided the link to. There are also other
pages on that site that discuss careful breeding practices.

When you start with unknown and untested dogs, almost nothing you can do
after that can turn that intended breeding into a responsible one. I really
hope you choose to educate yourself. If you'd like to become a breeder, then
study up on dog genetics, participate in conformation shows, perhaps some
Earthdog trials, obedience competitions, train them as Therapy Dogs....at
least two of those at a minimum would give an indication that you were at
least willing to find out their adaptability, trainability and underlying
temperaments. Then, a background screening of their parents, their siblings,
and grandparents for genetically inherited diseases would also be an
absolute minimum. Once you have the background and the training (and putting
their training up against others in order to have neutral third parties
assess them), you can also have them screened for those inherited illnesses
(and a regular vet isn't qualified to do this, by the way....you'd need to
go to a specialist). This is a minimum for responsible breeding.....and its
a ton of work. That's one of the reasons that Backyard Breeders do so much
damage: they think some papers and a working set of reproductive organs is
enough. Its not....and the rescues are filled to capacity (often with lame
and sick dogs) as a result.

If you're not willing to do the (above stated) minimum that it takes to
insure that the offspring you produce aren't sick, malformed, hobbled,
skittish, fearful, aggressive, etc, then please simply don't breed.

Good luck.

Tara


  #5  
Old July 7th 06, 05:56 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
silberj
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Need help with my Dachshunds


TaraG wrote:
"silberj" wrote in message
ups.com...

Thanks for your advice,


You're welcome :-)

but I think I may have misrepresented what I
meant. When I said putting him up for stud, I didn't mean to infer that
I was going to stud him out.


Whether you stud him "out" to others, or stud him to a dog you already own,
it is the exact same thing.

I definitely am not a a puppy mill,


I never said you were. Sounds more like you are thinking about becoming what
is known as a Backyard Breeder. My point was that while puppy mills are
horrible for the well being of individual dogs, Backyard Breeders are
actually really horroble for the well being of dogs overall. The people who
only breed their dogs once or twice (and therefor don't think they're
contributing much to the overpopulation problem) are actually the *biggest*
producers of puppies in the US. On a case by case basis, they don't seem to
be creatinbg that many dogs, but when added together, Backyard Breeders
create more puppies than all the Puppy Mills put together.

and
honestly these are the first registered dogs I have ever owned.


Which, honestly, is an even stronger argument against you breeding them. It
takes *years* of learning and research to understand what goes into careful
and responsible breeding of a certain breed. Years spent learning, and then
quite a bit of time searching for the dog that might be a good prospect for
breeding, and then even more time trialing and training to make sure the pup
is more than just potential, but a real example of what that breed should be
in terms of both health *and* temperament. Its astronomically unlikely that
*one* of the first purebreed dogs you've ever owned happens to meet the
criteria for a responsible breeding...let alone two of them.

Every
pet I have ever owned in my 39 years has come from a shelter.


That's awesome. Really.
But why undo all that good by breeding even one irresponsible litter?

I would
possibly like to breed the male (not the new one I just got) and the
female, however this is not a critical issue.


Again, I have to say that this is a very very bad idea. There is no shortage
of irresponsibly bred Dachshunds. Doxie rescue is, in fact, looking for
homes for the ones they already have every day.

Sorry if I didn't clarify
that enough.


No, you did. I knew what you meant. I know your intentions aren't
necessarily bad, but I don't think you are aware or informed enough about
how much damage you would be contributing to the already existing
irresponsible breeding crisis.

I do plan on getting educated on the responsibility aspect
and your input is certainly appreciated. Thanks again, I'll try to
follow your advice and see how that turns out, wish me luck.


Please carefully the page that I provided the link to. There are also other
pages on that site that discuss careful breeding practices.

When you start with unknown and untested dogs, almost nothing you can do
after that can turn that intended breeding into a responsible one. I really
hope you choose to educate yourself. If you'd like to become a breeder, then
study up on dog genetics, participate in conformation shows, perhaps some
Earthdog trials, obedience competitions, train them as Therapy Dogs....at
least two of those at a minimum would give an indication that you were at
least willing to find out their adaptability, trainability and underlying
temperaments. Then, a background screening of their parents, their siblings,
and grandparents for genetically inherited diseases would also be an
absolute minimum. Once you have the background and the training (and putting
their training up against others in order to have neutral third parties
assess them), you can also have them screened for those inherited illnesses
(and a regular vet isn't qualified to do this, by the way....you'd need to
go to a specialist). This is a minimum for responsible breeding.....and its
a ton of work. That's one of the reasons that Backyard Breeders do so much
damage: they think some papers and a working set of reproductive organs is
enough. Its not....and the rescues are filled to capacity (often with lame
and sick dogs) as a result.

If you're not willing to do the (above stated) minimum that it takes to
insure that the offspring you produce aren't sick, malformed, hobbled,
skittish, fearful, aggressive, etc, then please simply don't breed.

Good luck.

Tara


Thank you! You have certainly shed a different light on this subject,
and I feel I have learned a wealth in just a few hours. You are
correct, it does sound like a lot of work, and I am sure now I'm not
going to proceed on just a whim. Your logic is sound and I appreciate
your input. Thanks again for the information, for understanding, and
for your patience in explaining the other aspects to my situation. Take
care,

John

 




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