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Mixed Breeds Trait Dominance



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 15th 03, 05:22 PM
Jeff
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Default Mixed Breeds Trait Dominance

I am looking at different mixed breeds – labs, shepherds, hounds,
pointers, husky.
I have posted before about looking for a dog/breed that I can take in
the woods and mountains for long runs and thank everyone for the great
feedback.

My question has to do with whether or not it can be (relatively
reliably) predicted which breed personality traits will be more
dominant in a mixed pup. For example – take a lab/husky mix. Should I
expect this dog to also be very independent like the husky, or very
trainable like the lab? Or is there really no way to predict something
like that?

Anyone have any experiences with mixed breeds I have named?


Thanks
  #2  
Old August 15th 03, 06:49 PM
Emily Carroll
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My question has to do with whether or not it can be (relatively
reliably) predicted which breed personality traits will be more
dominant in a mixed pup. For example - take a lab/husky mix. Should I
expect this dog to also be very independent like the husky, or very
trainable like the lab? Or is there really no way to predict something
like that?


There really isn't any reliable way to predict that. However, you can tell
a bit from the dog's build. It's not that Labs don't have the energy to run
for 20 miles straight, it's that they aren't built to take the work of it
and will pull up lame or sore a lot quicker. So if you're, for example,
looking at a Lab/Husky mix, if you find one that's very light boned (more
like the husky), it will be able to do the work. BUT you also want a dog
that can do this off-lead, which means you'll have to wait for your puppy to
grow up to see how it deals.

Also, a puppy can't join you for at least a year or two on these runs, so
you may be better off looking at adults.

~Emily


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  #3  
Old August 15th 03, 06:55 PM
Suja
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Jeff wrote:

My question has to do with whether or not it can be (relatively
reliably) predicted which breed personality traits will be more
dominant in a mixed pup. For example – take a lab/husky mix. Should I
expect this dog to also be very independent like the husky, or very
trainable like the lab? Or is there really no way to predict something
like that?


There is no real way to predict with mixed breed puppies, how they'll
turn out. If the traits you are looking for are really important to
you, I would suggest that you look at young adults, about 2 years of
age. By then, pretty much what you see is what you get, and if you get
one from a rescue that properly evaluates the dogs, you'll be able to
see if they are temperamentally suited for making you a good companion.

Suja

  #4  
Old August 15th 03, 08:00 PM
Tara O.
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I can't answer your question but wanted to suggest that you look into
Dual-Purpose Labs being bred by breeders who are into the all-purpose dog.
There is a large coalition of ethical breeders now breeding for Labs who are
both beautiful to look at AND who have the very strong
endurance/trainability/retrieving traits of the breed. Running and climbing
are natural to the Lab and you may be able to find a good adult dual-purpose
dog from an ethical breeder because the dog washed out of a field work or
ended up with some trait that disqualified the dog from being bred.


--
Tara


  #5  
Old August 16th 03, 03:46 PM
Amy Dahl
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Nomdeplume wrote:

I'm not being smart-assed here, but, the lighter bones only benefit
someone who is racing. Muscular plus strong bones are OK for
endurance, IMO. Malamutes aren't so light boned, are they? And they
are the supreme endurance dogs.

I have hiked, backpacked with dogs for over a decade and I have heard
of Labs just quitting on some hikers. Greyhounds don't have
endurance. Built for speed. But with Labs, it seems to be a mental
thing, as they are not injured. They just quit.

OTOH, there are a weath of sporting dogs very similar to Labs, that I
have never heard of quitting. Goldens, Visla, even those wild and
crazy Irish Setters. You might consider something like a
Golden/Husky breed.

I'd ask on the hiking list, people who have Labs who do well on the
trail. Get the name of the breeder, and look for a Lab who has the
"right stuff" for you. You can also inquire about the body type of
the successful hiking Lab, so you can make a better informed
guestimate when choosing a mix.

Interesting observations. The work Labs were developed to do involves
working in bursts, with periods of rest in between. Pointing breeds
such as the Irish setter and Vizsla are designed to maintain a pace
for extended periods of time. I think broad vs. narrow chest is one
feature that bears on endurance. In addition, though, I think Labs
tend to lack an ability to pace themselves. When they go, they go all out.

There are some interesting studies of body temperature. A working
Lab's body temperature apparently goes up to about 106 within the
first ten minutes of work. It would be interesting to see if some of
the bird dog breeds maintain a lower body temperature, and if that is
a factor in their endurance. I wouldn't be surprised to learn that
was the case, especially as Labs' scenting ability falls off when they
get hot--and a bird dog needs its scenting ability!

There are a lot of people who use Labs as flushing dogs, and even
people breeding pointing Labs. These dogs may have a physique
and endurance level beyond that of the waterfowl-type Labs.

Amy Dahl
  #6  
Old August 16th 03, 06:44 PM
ceb
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(Jeff) wrote in
om:

My question has to do with whether or not it can be (relatively
reliably) predicted which breed personality traits will be more
dominant in a mixed pup. For example – take a lab/husky mix. Should I
expect this dog to also be very independent like the husky, or very
trainable like the lab? Or is there really no way to predict something
like that?


Others have said that there's no predicting this, and I agree. My cocker
spaniel/chow cross has a lot of the chow independence and also the cocker
eagerness to please. When she was younger, it was quite funny, she would
actually look more chowish at home and more cockerish when we were out and
about. Now that she's full grown, she doesn't seem to "morph" as much, and
she continues to be more independent than cockers and more friendly to
strangers than chows. She has the chow fastidiousness, which made
housebreaking a breeze.

I read up on both temperaments and liked what I knew of both of them, so I
was somewhat prepared for whatever she turned into. But mostly I went with
my gut feeling, Zoe spoke to me at the shelter, we just somehow connected
more than I did with the other dogs/puppies there. Her case is a little
different from most mixes, because she had two purebred parents, so what
made up her "mix" was known.

I'd say knowing the personality traits of the breeds that make up the mix
might be more useful for "ruling out" purposes than for "choosing"
purposes. If you don't like independence, for instance, and the dog has a
known independent breed in his/her background, then you might not want to
pick that dog.

Unless s/he speaks to you.

--Catherine
& Zoe the cockerchow who today is speaking to the detritus on my deck. Yes
I know I should clean it off.
  #7  
Old August 17th 03, 12:02 AM
Shelly & The Boys
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"dianne marie schoenberg" wrote in message
...
Amy Dahl wrote:
There are some interesting studies of body temperature. A working
Lab's body temperature apparently goes up to about 106 within the
first ten minutes of work. It would be interesting to see if some of
the bird dog breeds maintain a lower body temperature, and if that is
a factor in their endurance.


Could be. Coming from the herding dog side of things,
many of them were bred to be endurance trotters (GSDs,
for example) as opposed to a breed like BCs, which
tend to alternate between a creep and a sprint.

Briards (my breed) are very much endurance trotters.
I once tested out the body-temperature thing with her.
After working her non-stop for about 45 minutes, I
immediately took her temperature afterwards and found
that it had gone up less than 2 degrees.


Interesting stuff! I'm guessing that Belgians are much the
same way. Amazing as that is...seeing how some, especially
a lot of the Mals I've see, work in great bursts of energy?
Shelly & The Boys


  #8  
Old August 17th 03, 12:40 AM
Amy Dahl
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Default



Shelly & The Boys wrote:

Interesting stuff! I'm guessing that Belgians are much the
same way. Amazing as that is...seeing how some, especially
a lot of the Mals I've see, work in great bursts of energy?
Shelly & The Boys


I'm really looking forward to seeing more data on this. As far as I
know, Labs have been studied because they are subject to several
conditions classed as "exercise intolerance." I believe the
researchers were surprised by the temperature findings. I'm very
interested in Dianne's observation of her Briard

Amy Dahl
  #9  
Old August 17th 03, 01:04 AM
dianne marie schoenberg
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Amy Dahl wrote:
I'm really looking forward to seeing more data on this. As far as I
know, Labs have been studied because they are subject to several
conditions classed as "exercise intolerance." I believe the
researchers were surprised by the temperature findings. I'm very
interested in Dianne's observation of her Briard


Well, I'll tell you, the funniest thing about it was
standing there next to the sheep pen with the thermometer
stuck up her butt where a guy was screaming at his
out-of-control dog that kept running the sheep into
the fence. She was a very, very good girl :-).

Dianne
  #10  
Old August 17th 03, 01:40 AM
Shelly & The Boys
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Default


"Amy Dahl" wrote in message
...


Shelly & The Boys wrote:

Interesting stuff! I'm guessing that Belgians are much the
same way. Amazing as that is...seeing how some, especially
a lot of the Mals I've see, work in great bursts of energy?
Shelly & The Boys


I'm really looking forward to seeing more data on this. As far as I
know, Labs have been studied because they are subject to several
conditions classed as "exercise intolerance." I believe the
researchers were surprised by the temperature findings. I'm very
interested in Dianne's observation of her Briard


Yes, I've heard of that condition in Labs (cannot remember the
name of it) where they collapse after bursts of energy.
I'm curious now. I would be willing to try & get a temp before
and after running Bodhi on sheep, but he's never in for more
than probably 10-15 minutes at a time right now. I should really
time it, that way I have an idea of any progress. Right now,
he just gets all weird eyed when he's ready for a break, and
stops listening to me. That pretty much tells me it's time for
a drink & rest, for me, the sheep & him.
I'd actually try it w/ Coda as well (best guess, ColliexGolden)
while herding as well. Except Coda uses a lot more energy
bouncing around & barking since he's not near as confident as
Bodhi, so it wouldn't really be a fair comparison.
Shelly & The Boys


 




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