A dog & canine forum. DogBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » DogBanter forum » Dog forums » Dog breeds
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

ENG or AMER Foxhound



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old August 16th 03, 05:35 AM
Jo Wolf
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default ENG or AMER Foxhound

Most foxhounds, of either breed, are bred and owned by hunt clubs (as in
foxhunt). VERY few ever find their ways into show rings or pet homes.
This is not a large-numbers pair of breeds. Most are registered by the
Masters of Hounds organization, not the AKC. Finding a pup will be a
Major Project. Hunts generally breed for spring or fall puppies.

They will run. They are still bred to run. They will continue to be
bred to run. Did I say that they will run? Well, they will. Um... and
they are professional athletes. grin

They can be delightful companions. But your neighbors will strangle you
if you leave the dog outside in the yard/pen/kennel very much. Like all
hounds, they can be Very Noisey outside. They are pack animals, and if
you take them out of the hunt pack, they need to be part of the family
pack... which means indoors. They can be trained with patience and
persistence... and clicker techniques and making it all a game... not
work.

Jo Wolf
Martinez, Georgia

  #2  
Old August 16th 03, 03:04 PM
Tallgrass
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

(Jo Wolf) wrote in message ...
Most foxhounds, of either breed, are bred and owned by hunt clubs (as in
foxhunt). VERY few ever find their ways into show rings or pet homes.
This is not a large-numbers pair of breeds. Most are registered by the
Masters of Hounds organization, not the AKC. Finding a pup will be a
Major Project. Hunts generally breed for spring or fall puppies.

They will run. They are still bred to run. They will continue to be
bred to run. Did I say that they will run? Well, they will. Um... and
they are professional athletes. grin

They can be delightful companions. But your neighbors will strangle you
if you leave the dog outside in the yard/pen/kennel very much. Like all
hounds, they can be Very Noisey outside. They are pack animals, and if
you take them out of the hunt pack, they need to be part of the family
pack... which means indoors. They can be trained with patience and
persistence... and clicker techniques and making it all a game... not
work.

Jo Wolf
Martinez, Georgia


Did you tell them they will RUN???(!!!)

My experiences, granted, are with a Walker/Bluetick cross, but I
suspect there is no difference in their desire to RUN.

And then they get lost, and wind up in the dogpounds.

There have been a few foxhounds in the rings in the past few years, so
it should not be impossible to find a dog. Guess it depends on
whether one wants a dog to hunt or one to show and be a pet; still,
they are going to want to run.

If you get a foxhound, or a coonhound, tatoo them or microchip them,
eh? Too many lost hounds in the pounds.

ttfn......
Linda H., waiting for Blueticks to be Recognized as a breed
  #3  
Old August 16th 03, 07:31 PM
Blasjj
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Well, they are pretty, but if they are constantly chasing things.. that's a
bad thing...
"Janice" wrote in message
...
I haven't owned foxhounds before but have owned other hounds that
were bred to work by chasing things.

You'll generally find that hounds that were bred to pursue quarry
tend to be less focused on what YOU want to do, less interested in
working by direction (being told, following directions). This level
of independence has an effect on what is sometimes called a
"trainability factor", although it's not a very accurate term.

Let's just say some breeds are especially less motivated to assign
any approximation of the level of importance to some tasks as will
their human counterpart. (Much like most cats.) When motivated, and
when they trust and respect their handler, they will do almost
anything to humor their handler and may even do it to perfection,
maybe once or twice, (as if to show you that they can, already) then
that's all... (a sense of humor is required).

The problem is most average dog owners don't reach that level of
communication with their dogs. Observe many dog owners who have a
left arm longer than the rightg };

My other hounds were salukis which can be very mellow, practically
comatose house companions and couch potatoes. My impression of the
foxhounds is that they are much more active indoors than those in the
sighthound groups. Sighthounds tend to be somewhere between normal to
practically nonexistant while indoors. I'm not recommending you a
sighthound, but just comparing foxhounds to a hound type with which I
am familiar. Sighthounds and I believe foxhounds will be extremely
active when outside to exercise. Independent dogs in general are
never going to be especially good off leash.

So there is my take on it, independence, activity level, trainability
-- in general, these may be the greater challenges in adopting a
foxhound into your life if your goal is a companion dog that also
lives in the house. If you're gone during the day, and come home with
stacks of things to do, a foxhound is probably going to want to
majorly put you through your paces every night. My Saluki's would
greet then go back and curl up to sleep but would enjoy an insane
gallop around my property when I had a chance later in the evening.

I personally love some of the independent breeds but the ones I like
best are laid back and mellow for the most part, really don't compare
to the "bounce-off-the-walls" active breeds.

Maybe your best approach in sizing up the foxhound breeds is to
contact breeders who specifically breed AKC show dogs, which may tend
to be lower key than the hunting lines. Meet their dogs, then ask
them to put you in contact with owners of dogs from their bloodlines.

--
Janice
Semavi Anatolians
DEduce to email



  #4  
Old August 18th 03, 05:28 AM
tanya
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I have an 7 year old american, Minna, that I adopted without any prior
experiernce of hounds. I read the limited liiterature available on the web
and it scared me severely. 6 mile runs at least 3 times a week; never
letting dog off lead; indepentant; untrainable etc. However, Minna has been
an absolute delight. She is generally obedient (except when an evil cat
presents). She is always aware of me and is very eager to please. She was
barking at anything and everything that walked past the house, but that was
easily sovled through minimising what she could see and training. She gets
on well with other dogs - absolutly loves to play with any young, male dog
at the dog park. Loves children. Is fairly inactive in the house, but loves
her regular walks (an hour off lead in the morning, and 20-30 minutes at the
dog park or off-lead beach in the afternoon). She is totally uninterested in
toys, retrieving, or chasing anything except cats (and the horses who she
tries to play with). My cockateil recently landed on her head and she only
looked annoyed at having been woken up whereas our cattle dog would
swallowed it in one gulp. Has an amazing nose - she can smell the cheese
before its been taken out of the car after shopping!

I suppose my advice is that foxhounds as a breed may not sound worth
pursuing based on available information, but my experience has definitly
been a great one. If you want an intelligent, faithful, and active dog
they're a great addition to the family.

Tanya

"Blasjj" wrote in message
...
Anyone have feedback regarding this breed? Do they run profusely?

Pitfalls?
Pros? Cons? Beautiful breed.. we are thinking of researching further,
finding a reputable breeder, and so on.




  #5  
Old August 19th 03, 02:41 AM
Blasjj
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

thanks.. I value your opinion.. thanks.
"tanya" wrote in message
...
I have an 7 year old american, Minna, that I adopted without any prior
experiernce of hounds. I read the limited liiterature available on the web
and it scared me severely. 6 mile runs at least 3 times a week; never
letting dog off lead; indepentant; untrainable etc. However, Minna has

been
an absolute delight. She is generally obedient (except when an evil cat
presents). She is always aware of me and is very eager to please. She was
barking at anything and everything that walked past the house, but that

was
easily sovled through minimising what she could see and training. She gets
on well with other dogs - absolutly loves to play with any young, male dog
at the dog park. Loves children. Is fairly inactive in the house, but

loves
her regular walks (an hour off lead in the morning, and 20-30 minutes at

the
dog park or off-lead beach in the afternoon). She is totally uninterested

in
toys, retrieving, or chasing anything except cats (and the horses who she
tries to play with). My cockateil recently landed on her head and she only
looked annoyed at having been woken up whereas our cattle dog would
swallowed it in one gulp. Has an amazing nose - she can smell the cheese
before its been taken out of the car after shopping!

I suppose my advice is that foxhounds as a breed may not sound worth
pursuing based on available information, but my experience has definitly
been a great one. If you want an intelligent, faithful, and active dog
they're a great addition to the family.

Tanya

"Blasjj" wrote in message
...
Anyone have feedback regarding this breed? Do they run profusely?

Pitfalls?
Pros? Cons? Beautiful breed.. we are thinking of researching further,
finding a reputable breeder, and so on.






 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.2.0 (Unregistered)
Copyright 2004-2019 DogBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.