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  #1  
Old August 21st 06, 11:56 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue,rec.pets.dogs.misc,rec.pets.dogs.breeds,rec.pets.dogs,alt.religion.dake-bonoism
Michele
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Posts: 12
Default Dog Breed

First off, you definitely need to read up on the breeds that you are
interested in. Secondly if you take a trip to the local pound or animal
shelter you are bound to find several dogs meeting the description of " high
affection/low aggression". some of which may even be pure bred. Unless you
are planning to breed or show the dog I do not recommend getting it from a
breeder. I'm not saying that all breeders are bad but you are more likely
to run into health issues with a pure bred than you are with a mixed breed
dog. As far as the breeds you are looking at the only one I would be weary
of would be the Dalmatian, I have run into several Dalmatians that have
aggression issues and they don't tend to be as good with children. Great
Danes are large dogs and without training can be a little hard to handle,
they are a bit clumsy as puppies since their bodies grow fast and they have
a little trouble getting use to their own size at first. Bulldogs are
fairly docile and low maintenance, though they can have weight trouble if
not watched. Bloodhounds are very loyal dogs and are fairly good with
children, you should be aware that they tend to let their nose lead them and
if not closely watched will take after almost any scent or movement from a
small animal. I hope this helps in your search for a dog.

Michele


  #2  
Old August 22nd 06, 12:01 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue,rec.pets.dogs.misc,rec.pets.dogs.breeds,rec.pets.dogs,alt.religion.dake-bonoism
Amy Dahl
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Posts: 368
Default Dog Breed



Michele wrote:


I'm not saying that all breeders are bad but you are more likely
to run into health issues with a pure bred than you are with a mixed breed
dog.


A lot of people believe this, but my vet tells me that her experience
is the opposite. Mixes can have all of the problems purebreds face,
but apparently the efforts of breeders to reduce their incidence are
paying off, at least among the clientele of this, rather large, practice.

On the other hand, a good breeder provides lifelong support that
can be invaluable, especially for a family with children.

Amy Dahl

  #3  
Old August 22nd 06, 12:13 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue,rec.pets.dogs.misc,rec.pets.dogs.breeds,rec.pets.dogs,alt.religion.dake-bonoism
shelly
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Posts: 6,155
Default Dog Breed

On Mon, 21 Aug 2006 22:56:21 GMT, "Michele"
wrote:

I'm not saying that all breeders are bad but you are more likely
to run into health issues with a pure bred than you are with a mixed breed
dog.


That's not true. And, if you think about it, it doesn't even make much
sense. Genes don't appear and disappear at will. If purebred A has
disease X and purebred B has disease Y, then their offspring could end
up with both disease X *and* disease Y. Your best bet for getting a
healthy dog--whether it is a purebred or a mixed breed--is to find a
responsible breeder who tests for the known diseases in the breed(s).

--
Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)

Tell no one what you are about too see. It should never have been
attempted by humans in the first place.
-- Melora Creager
  #4  
Old August 23rd 06, 09:59 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue,rec.pets.dogs.misc,rec.pets.dogs.breeds,rec.pets.dogs,alt.religion.dake-bonoism
Michele
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Posts: 12
Default Dog Breed

My personal experince with dealing with breeders that have animals that end
up at the shelter is that many times they breed to closley and the puppies
end up with mutations or are not healthy b/c of the close bloodlines. Like
I mentioned before this is not the case with all breeders, some take very
good care of thier puppies even after they have gone to thier forever homes.
But thier are those that do not take this approach and also don't take care
of thier animals the way that they should. I do have to agree with shelley
that no matter what kind or breed of dog you get you should definatley
assess it for illness and or injury and make sure that it is in good health.

Michele



  #5  
Old August 23rd 06, 10:22 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue,rec.pets.dogs.misc,rec.pets.dogs.breeds,rec.pets.dogs
shelly
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Posts: 6,155
Default Hybrid Vigor Myth (was Dog Breed)

[Non-dog groups trimmed]

On Wed, 23 Aug 2006 20:59:36 GMT, "Michele"
wrote:

My personal experince with dealing with breeders that have animals that end
up at the shelter is that many times they breed to closley and the puppies
end up with mutations or are not healthy b/c of the close bloodlines.


I've spent a fair amount of time in shelters, and I don't think I've
ever been able to point at a dog and identify it as being there because
of "close breeding." Making such claims is ignorant, and does shelter
dogs a huge disservice. The majority of them are at risk of being
killed for the sole reason that no one cared enough about them, *NOT*
because they are unhealthy, or that they were "bred too closely"
(whatever that means).

Like
I mentioned before this is not the case with all breeders, some take very
good care of thier puppies even after they have gone to thier forever homes.
But thier are those that do not take this approach and also don't take care
of thier animals the way that they should.


The point is that this is not a purebred vs. mixed breed issue. It is a
responsible breeder vs. irresponsible breeder issue. Learning what it
takes to breed responsibly, and sharing that knowledge with others, is
far more useful than disseminating myths about purebreds being sicklier
than mixed breed dogs.

I do have to agree with shelley
that no matter what kind or breed of dog you get you should definatley
assess it for illness and or injury and make sure that it is in good health.


That's not what I said, actually. I said that your best bet for getting
a healthy dog is to find a responsible breeder who tests for the known
diseases in that breed(s). While there are some tests that should be
done on the actual puppies, once the puppies are born, it is too late to
start thinking about breeding for good health. The health (and
temperament!) screening process should have begun years, or even
decades, before the puppies were ever conceived.

--
Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)

If all paths but lead to the grave
Then let us dance along our way
-- Faith and the Muse, "Scars Flown Proud"
  #6  
Old August 23rd 06, 10:28 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
Mary Healey
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Posts: 407
Default Dog Breed

"Michele" wrote in
news:[email protected]:

My personal experince with dealing with breeders that have animals
that end up at the shelter is that many times they breed to closley
and the puppies end up with mutations or are not healthy b/c of the
close bloodlines.


My personal experience with breeders that have animals that end up in
shelters is that many times they don't screen their puppy buyers well
enough and sell puppies to idiots. That has bugger-all to do with the
dogs, mutations, or health testing.

  #7  
Old August 23rd 06, 10:31 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
Mary Healey
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Posts: 407
Default Hybrid Vigor Myth (was Dog Breed)

Shelly wrote:
I've spent a fair amount of time in shelters, and I don't think I've
ever been able to point at a dog and identify it as being there
because of "close breeding."


Of the owner, perhaps.

The point is that this is not a purebred vs. mixed breed issue. It is
a responsible breeder vs. irresponsible breeder issue.


Shelter populations are more about resposible v. irresponsible owners, and
only secondarily about resp./irresp. breeders.

  #8  
Old August 23rd 06, 10:42 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
shelly
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,155
Default Hybrid Vigor Myth (was Dog Breed)

On 23 Aug 2006 21:31:18 GMT, Mary Healey wrote:

Of the owner, perhaps.


MeanyPants. You made me choke on a french fry.

The point is that this is not a purebred vs. mixed breed issue. It is
a responsible breeder vs. irresponsible breeder issue.


Shelter populations are more about resposible v. irresponsible owners, and
only secondarily about resp./irresp. breeders.


Oh, absolutely! Michele is very confused about at least a few things.

--
Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)

O is for Olive run through with an awl.
-- Edward Gorey, The Gashlycrumb Tinies
  #9  
Old August 23rd 06, 11:05 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue,rec.pets.dogs.misc,rec.pets.dogs.breeds
Suja
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Posts: 873
Default Hybrid Vigor Myth (was Dog Breed)


"Shelly" wrote in message:

(whatever that means).


Line breeding is BAAAAAD, and out crosses are GOOOOD.

HTH!

Suja


  #10  
Old August 23rd 06, 11:16 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
Michele
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Posts: 12
Default Dog Breed

I'm sorry if for some reason people believe I'm ignorant b/c of one posting,
but they also did not have to watch a puppy that came from a breeder be
euthanized b/c it was blind, deaf and having seizures. This particular puppy
was given to a small child as a "gift" (which some gift it turned out to be)
only b/c the breeder couldn't sell it. Now the breeding to closley refers
to breeders breeding within the bloodlines of one family of dogs, and I did
not say they were in shelters for that reason so get your facts straight.
Furthermore, You are right it does have to do with resposible vs.
irresposible breeders and owners, and i don't know where you are from but
most of the breeders in the area where i live do not take the time to have
thier animals tested for known diseases and most only breed here to sell the
puppies for money......LIKE I SAID NOT ALL DO THIS!!!!!! I also did not
say that getting a shelter dog would prevent running into one with health
issues, but in the area where I live this is truer than getting a dog from a
breeder.

Michele


 




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