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Dog Breeds, Expense



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 23rd 06, 03:17 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health,rec.pets.dogs.breeds,rec.pets.dogs.misc,alt.radio.talk.richard-dolce
Suja
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Posts: 873
Default Dog Breeds, Expense


"Thomas Silverstein" wrote in message:

Do you think that certain types of dogs tend to require a greater
financial commitment that others in terms of food, housing, veterinary
care and so on?


Well bred dogs in general turn out to be less expensive in the long run than
poorly bred dogs. What Diane and Paula said are spot on. I will only add
that all other things being equal, larger dogs are more expensive than
smaller dogs. They tend to eat more, preventative medicines cost more,
prescription medicines cost more, etc. And no matter what dog you end up
getting, it is good to have emergency funds set aside. This could be some
small amount that you save on a monthly basis or a credit card that you set
aside for such use. A dog tearing an ACL, or running into something and
hurting itself, or cutting its paw while being walked can't really be
predicted.

Suja


  #2  
Old August 23rd 06, 03:55 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health,rec.pets.dogs.breeds,rec.pets.dogs.misc,alt.radio.talk.richard-dolce
[email protected]
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Posts: 16
Default Dog Breeds, Expense


Suja wrote:
"Thomas Silverstein" wrote in message:

Do you think that certain types of dogs tend to require a greater
financial commitment that others in terms of food, housing, veterinary
care and so on?


Well bred dogs in general turn out to be less expensive in the long run than
poorly bred dogs. What Diane and Paula said are spot on. I will only add
that all other things being equal, larger dogs are more expensive than
smaller dogs. They tend to eat more, preventative medicines cost more,
prescription medicines cost more, etc. And no matter what dog you end up
getting, it is good to have emergency funds set aside. This could be some
small amount that you save on a monthly basis or a credit card that you set
aside for such use. A dog tearing an ACL, or running into something and
hurting itself, or cutting its paw while being walked can't really be
predicted.

Suja



I totally agree with all of this. My parents have a toy poodle from a
responsible breeder. (I found the breeder through someone I know and
checked all the "fine print".) I have three German Shepherds from a
responsible breeder. My mother spends a minute fraction of the cost
for her dog's food, flea preventative, etc.
She does have to pay a groomer though.

Beth

  #3  
Old August 23rd 06, 05:19 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health,rec.pets.dogs.breeds,rec.pets.dogs.misc
Toni
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Posts: 83
Default Dog Breeds, Expense


"Suja" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

Well bred dogs in general turn out to be less expensive in the long run
than
poorly bred dogs. What Diane and Paula said are spot on. I will only add
that all other things being equal, larger dogs are more expensive than
smaller dogs. They tend to eat more, preventative medicines cost more,
prescription medicines cost more, etc. And no matter what dog you end up
getting, it is good to have emergency funds set aside.




Large and giant breeds cost substantially more.
The point about prescription medications being more for larger dogs is spot
on- antibiotics for a resistant urinary tract infection requiring Cipro for
three weeks for a 200 Lb. dog is not cheap. Ditto heartworm preventative and
topical flea preparations. Surgeries are more, and often two veterinarians
must be in attendance for a surgery in order to close properly- a long
incision is daunting for many "small animal" vets. Dentals w/anesthesia are
more- anything which is dosed by the pound can be exhorbitant in a giant
breed. And it takes more individual xrays to cover any given area on a big
dog, too.

Many large/giant breeds are more prone to bloat and pneumonia which is also
a large bite out of your wallet. And as they enter old age heart meds and
arthritis meds can really eat up a paycheck.

It is a real consideration.


--
Toni
http://www.irish-wolfhounds.com


 




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