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Questions about unwanted dogs



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 4th 03, 08:09 PM
Scott T. Jensen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Questions about unwanted dogs

1) What happens to the dogs after they've been killed by the pound?

2) What is currently being done to reduce dogs from being abandoned by their
masters?

I just watched a documentary about dogs and part of it was on the sad fact
that an eighth of all of them are abandoned by their masters and/or dropped
off at dog pounds. The documentary was made in 1985 and said that over 70%
of dogs dropped off at humane societies end up being killed at those places.
A very depressing fact.

The documentary also said that two major contributing factors to the above
we

1) Dogs are bought as puppies and owners are unaware of what the puppy will
eventually grow into.

2) Puppies are bought as impulse items and gifts. Those given as gifts
might not be wanted by the recipients.

Just tossing an idea out here, but what if dogs were sold like guns? There
being a five-day waiting period between placing a purchase of the puppy and
making the actual purchase. Also during this time, a criminal background
check could be done to insure the puppy isn't turned over to a convicted pet
abuser or chronic pet abandoner (i.e., ones that only like puppies, get rid
of them when they become adults, and get another puppy). How about also
requiring them to somehow go and see in person the adult version of the
puppy they're about to buy so the purchase is a more informed purchase?

Scott Jensen
--
Got a business problem or question? Like to start a business?
You can explore those problems, questions, and dreams in
misc.business.consulting, misc.business.marketing.moderated
misc.business.moderated, and misc.entrepreneurs.moderated


  #2  
Old September 5th 03, 04:30 AM
Charles Richmond
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Kyler Laird wrote:

"Scott T. Jensen" writes:

Just tossing an idea out here, but what if dogs were sold like guns?


I'm all for encouraging responsible pet (and firearm) ownership/guardianship.
I also appreciate your desire to educate potential adopters of what that pup
will become. It's hard for me to be supportive of this idea though. It
"punishes" people before they do anything wrong.

Look around. That is "standard operating procedure" for the U.S.
Lots of people are checked for bombs or guns when they board
airplanes. Are those people already guilty??? No, they just have
to submit to all this...because of the small percentage of idiots
who cause trouble. So why should acquiring a dog be any different???

Have you considered creative ways to place the burden of irresponsible
behavior on those who commit it? I think of things like requiring all dogs
to be registered (as is the case already in many places, but it needs to be
enforced) and microchipped. Then, if a dog is dumped/given up, charge the
owner for the burden he's created. Maybe even extend it to the person who
sold the dog (in such cases).

I can see a big "black market" in un-chipped dogs....

Heck, I wouldn't even be bothered by "dog bonds". Put up some money at the
time of acquisition of a dog. At the dog's death or transfer, you get it
back. If something happens to the dog before then that requires municipal
services, the money goes to cover the expense. Commercial entities and
other organizations could offer bonding according to how risky they think
the situation is. I'd bet that they'd want to ensure that the adopter has
thought through responsible ownership before providing a bond.

Nothing is going to stop stupid people (especially those with plenty of
money), but we can at least try to make them pay for their mistakes.

Agreed. We can *never* stop stupid people...but we can slow them
down a bit. Hey, if the stupid person needed some money...they
could kill the dog and get their deposit.

--
+----------------------------------------------------------------+
| Charles and Francis Richmond richmond at plano dot net |
+----------------------------------------------------------------+
  #3  
Old September 5th 03, 04:30 AM
Charles Richmond
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Kyler Laird wrote:

"Scott T. Jensen" writes:

Just tossing an idea out here, but what if dogs were sold like guns?


I'm all for encouraging responsible pet (and firearm) ownership/guardianship.
I also appreciate your desire to educate potential adopters of what that pup
will become. It's hard for me to be supportive of this idea though. It
"punishes" people before they do anything wrong.

Look around. That is "standard operating procedure" for the U.S.
Lots of people are checked for bombs or guns when they board
airplanes. Are those people already guilty??? No, they just have
to submit to all this...because of the small percentage of idiots
who cause trouble. So why should acquiring a dog be any different???

Have you considered creative ways to place the burden of irresponsible
behavior on those who commit it? I think of things like requiring all dogs
to be registered (as is the case already in many places, but it needs to be
enforced) and microchipped. Then, if a dog is dumped/given up, charge the
owner for the burden he's created. Maybe even extend it to the person who
sold the dog (in such cases).

I can see a big "black market" in un-chipped dogs....

Heck, I wouldn't even be bothered by "dog bonds". Put up some money at the
time of acquisition of a dog. At the dog's death or transfer, you get it
back. If something happens to the dog before then that requires municipal
services, the money goes to cover the expense. Commercial entities and
other organizations could offer bonding according to how risky they think
the situation is. I'd bet that they'd want to ensure that the adopter has
thought through responsible ownership before providing a bond.

Nothing is going to stop stupid people (especially those with plenty of
money), but we can at least try to make them pay for their mistakes.

Agreed. We can *never* stop stupid people...but we can slow them
down a bit. Hey, if the stupid person needed some money...they
could kill the dog and get their deposit.

--
+----------------------------------------------------------------+
| Charles and Francis Richmond richmond at plano dot net |
+----------------------------------------------------------------+
  #4  
Old September 5th 03, 04:30 AM
Charles Richmond
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Kyler Laird wrote:

"Scott T. Jensen" writes:

Just tossing an idea out here, but what if dogs were sold like guns?


I'm all for encouraging responsible pet (and firearm) ownership/guardianship.
I also appreciate your desire to educate potential adopters of what that pup
will become. It's hard for me to be supportive of this idea though. It
"punishes" people before they do anything wrong.

Look around. That is "standard operating procedure" for the U.S.
Lots of people are checked for bombs or guns when they board
airplanes. Are those people already guilty??? No, they just have
to submit to all this...because of the small percentage of idiots
who cause trouble. So why should acquiring a dog be any different???

Have you considered creative ways to place the burden of irresponsible
behavior on those who commit it? I think of things like requiring all dogs
to be registered (as is the case already in many places, but it needs to be
enforced) and microchipped. Then, if a dog is dumped/given up, charge the
owner for the burden he's created. Maybe even extend it to the person who
sold the dog (in such cases).

I can see a big "black market" in un-chipped dogs....

Heck, I wouldn't even be bothered by "dog bonds". Put up some money at the
time of acquisition of a dog. At the dog's death or transfer, you get it
back. If something happens to the dog before then that requires municipal
services, the money goes to cover the expense. Commercial entities and
other organizations could offer bonding according to how risky they think
the situation is. I'd bet that they'd want to ensure that the adopter has
thought through responsible ownership before providing a bond.

Nothing is going to stop stupid people (especially those with plenty of
money), but we can at least try to make them pay for their mistakes.

Agreed. We can *never* stop stupid people...but we can slow them
down a bit. Hey, if the stupid person needed some money...they
could kill the dog and get their deposit.

--
+----------------------------------------------------------------+
| Charles and Francis Richmond richmond at plano dot net |
+----------------------------------------------------------------+
  #5  
Old September 5th 03, 07:16 AM
Vinnie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

*1) What happens to the dogs after they've been killed by the pound?*

Incineration.

*2) What is currently being done to reduce dogs from being abandoned by
their
masters?*

Nothing much in the UK, although I think that we should have a law in place
that requires all dogs sold in shops or privately to have a microchip
inserted and when passed on the details of the new owner logged. Just like
cars so you can trace the owner of the abandoned dog and prosecute that
person.

One other thing that can reduce the number of dogs being put to sleep at
pounds is the banning of puppy farms a lot of these do not care for the dog
only the money. If more people looked to rescue homes for a pet then a dam
site more dogs would get a good like rather than a quick unnecessary death.

Just my thoughts :-)
--

Vinnie.
---------------------------
The Rescue Kennel.
http://groups.msn.com/Therescuekennell
"Scott T. Jensen" wrote in message
...
1) What happens to the dogs after they've been killed by the pound?

2) What is currently being done to reduce dogs from being abandoned by

their
masters?

I just watched a documentary about dogs and part of it was on the sad fact
that an eighth of all of them are abandoned by their masters and/or

dropped
off at dog pounds. The documentary was made in 1985 and said that over

70%
of dogs dropped off at humane societies end up being killed at those

places.
A very depressing fact.

The documentary also said that two major contributing factors to the above
we

1) Dogs are bought as puppies and owners are unaware of what the puppy

will
eventually grow into.

2) Puppies are bought as impulse items and gifts. Those given as gifts
might not be wanted by the recipients.

Just tossing an idea out here, but what if dogs were sold like guns?

There
being a five-day waiting period between placing a purchase of the puppy

and
making the actual purchase. Also during this time, a criminal background
check could be done to insure the puppy isn't turned over to a convicted

pet
abuser or chronic pet abandoner (i.e., ones that only like puppies, get

rid
of them when they become adults, and get another puppy). How about also
requiring them to somehow go and see in person the adult version of the
puppy they're about to buy so the purchase is a more informed purchase?

Scott Jensen
--
Got a business problem or question? Like to start a business?
You can explore those problems, questions, and dreams in
misc.business.consulting, misc.business.marketing.moderated
misc.business.moderated, and misc.entrepreneurs.moderated




  #6  
Old September 5th 03, 07:16 AM
Vinnie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

*1) What happens to the dogs after they've been killed by the pound?*

Incineration.

*2) What is currently being done to reduce dogs from being abandoned by
their
masters?*

Nothing much in the UK, although I think that we should have a law in place
that requires all dogs sold in shops or privately to have a microchip
inserted and when passed on the details of the new owner logged. Just like
cars so you can trace the owner of the abandoned dog and prosecute that
person.

One other thing that can reduce the number of dogs being put to sleep at
pounds is the banning of puppy farms a lot of these do not care for the dog
only the money. If more people looked to rescue homes for a pet then a dam
site more dogs would get a good like rather than a quick unnecessary death.

Just my thoughts :-)
--

Vinnie.
---------------------------
The Rescue Kennel.
http://groups.msn.com/Therescuekennell
"Scott T. Jensen" wrote in message
...
1) What happens to the dogs after they've been killed by the pound?

2) What is currently being done to reduce dogs from being abandoned by

their
masters?

I just watched a documentary about dogs and part of it was on the sad fact
that an eighth of all of them are abandoned by their masters and/or

dropped
off at dog pounds. The documentary was made in 1985 and said that over

70%
of dogs dropped off at humane societies end up being killed at those

places.
A very depressing fact.

The documentary also said that two major contributing factors to the above
we

1) Dogs are bought as puppies and owners are unaware of what the puppy

will
eventually grow into.

2) Puppies are bought as impulse items and gifts. Those given as gifts
might not be wanted by the recipients.

Just tossing an idea out here, but what if dogs were sold like guns?

There
being a five-day waiting period between placing a purchase of the puppy

and
making the actual purchase. Also during this time, a criminal background
check could be done to insure the puppy isn't turned over to a convicted

pet
abuser or chronic pet abandoner (i.e., ones that only like puppies, get

rid
of them when they become adults, and get another puppy). How about also
requiring them to somehow go and see in person the adult version of the
puppy they're about to buy so the purchase is a more informed purchase?

Scott Jensen
--
Got a business problem or question? Like to start a business?
You can explore those problems, questions, and dreams in
misc.business.consulting, misc.business.marketing.moderated
misc.business.moderated, and misc.entrepreneurs.moderated




  #7  
Old September 5th 03, 07:16 AM
Vinnie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

*1) What happens to the dogs after they've been killed by the pound?*

Incineration.

*2) What is currently being done to reduce dogs from being abandoned by
their
masters?*

Nothing much in the UK, although I think that we should have a law in place
that requires all dogs sold in shops or privately to have a microchip
inserted and when passed on the details of the new owner logged. Just like
cars so you can trace the owner of the abandoned dog and prosecute that
person.

One other thing that can reduce the number of dogs being put to sleep at
pounds is the banning of puppy farms a lot of these do not care for the dog
only the money. If more people looked to rescue homes for a pet then a dam
site more dogs would get a good like rather than a quick unnecessary death.

Just my thoughts :-)
--

Vinnie.
---------------------------
The Rescue Kennel.
http://groups.msn.com/Therescuekennell
"Scott T. Jensen" wrote in message
...
1) What happens to the dogs after they've been killed by the pound?

2) What is currently being done to reduce dogs from being abandoned by

their
masters?

I just watched a documentary about dogs and part of it was on the sad fact
that an eighth of all of them are abandoned by their masters and/or

dropped
off at dog pounds. The documentary was made in 1985 and said that over

70%
of dogs dropped off at humane societies end up being killed at those

places.
A very depressing fact.

The documentary also said that two major contributing factors to the above
we

1) Dogs are bought as puppies and owners are unaware of what the puppy

will
eventually grow into.

2) Puppies are bought as impulse items and gifts. Those given as gifts
might not be wanted by the recipients.

Just tossing an idea out here, but what if dogs were sold like guns?

There
being a five-day waiting period between placing a purchase of the puppy

and
making the actual purchase. Also during this time, a criminal background
check could be done to insure the puppy isn't turned over to a convicted

pet
abuser or chronic pet abandoner (i.e., ones that only like puppies, get

rid
of them when they become adults, and get another puppy). How about also
requiring them to somehow go and see in person the adult version of the
puppy they're about to buy so the purchase is a more informed purchase?

Scott Jensen
--
Got a business problem or question? Like to start a business?
You can explore those problems, questions, and dreams in
misc.business.consulting, misc.business.marketing.moderated
misc.business.moderated, and misc.entrepreneurs.moderated




  #8  
Old September 5th 03, 04:29 PM
Emily Carroll
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

1) What happens to the dogs after they've been killed by the pound?

The bodies are either incinerated or sold for research. Many of the dog
carcasses that vet students work on are former pets.

2) What is currently being done to reduce dogs from being abandoned by

their
masters?


Not enough to make a difference, unfortunately. Responsible breeders play a
big role by ensuring that any dog they produce has a home for the rest of
it's life, regardless of circumstance, by taking the dog back at any point
in it's life (provided the breeder is alive, knows of the situation, and is
physically capable of doing so).

Shelters & rescues do their fair share as well by providing low-cost
spay/neuter programs, taking in unwanted animals, education, and other
services.

The problem is that most of the dogs produced each year are produced by
people who breed "casually," meaning that they have a female that is in heat
and breed her to the boy down the street for some puppies to sell. They
have no intentions of keeping anything from the litter (usually), nor are
they interested in things like health, whether the puppy will stay in that
home, or any other traits of the breed.

An additional problem is that most puppy buyers do not educate themselves on
dog behavior and training before bringing home the puppy. They also forget
or never know that dogs don't come housebroken, trained, and knowing not to
bite. In addition, many "cute" breeds have some horrendous temperament
issues. Poorly bred Cocker spaniels are common fear biters that are also
dominant within their household. Untrained Rotties can be overprotective
and lack the training to back down when told to. Chows and Shar-Pei are
specifically NOT good first dogs because they are intelligent, protective,
aloof, and independent in one big package. (That equals smarter than owner
+ potentially aggressive + to strangers + doesn't listen well to owner
without training). These are not traits that are across the breed, nor do
any of these breeds typically have aggression issues--but in inexperienced
hands, these four breeds alone can cause major problems within a household.

Just tossing an idea out here, but what if dogs were sold like guns?

There
being a five-day waiting period between placing a purchase of the puppy

and
making the actual purchase. Also during this time, a criminal background
check could be done to insure the puppy isn't turned over to a convicted

pet
abuser or chronic pet abandoner (i.e., ones that only like puppies, get

rid
of them when they become adults, and get another puppy). How about also
requiring them to somehow go and see in person the adult version of the
puppy they're about to buy so the purchase is a more informed purchase?


That would be nice, but responsible breeders already do that. Not the
police check, but they do have waiting periods. Also, the "adult" version
of their breed is usually VERY different from the "adolescent" version. For
example, my experience in Labs. Rusty is a sweet but energetic 8 week old
puppy. Bridge, at 7 months, was a terror--she'd steal off the counters,
jump up, mouthed us, ran off, bad trait, she had it. Bridge at 4 years was
vastly different--obedience trained, well-mannered, housebroken. She's
nothing like she was at 7 months. (Bridge is 10 now.)

~Emily


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.510 / Virus Database: 307 - Release Date: 8/14/2003


  #9  
Old September 5th 03, 04:29 PM
Emily Carroll
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

1) What happens to the dogs after they've been killed by the pound?

The bodies are either incinerated or sold for research. Many of the dog
carcasses that vet students work on are former pets.

2) What is currently being done to reduce dogs from being abandoned by

their
masters?


Not enough to make a difference, unfortunately. Responsible breeders play a
big role by ensuring that any dog they produce has a home for the rest of
it's life, regardless of circumstance, by taking the dog back at any point
in it's life (provided the breeder is alive, knows of the situation, and is
physically capable of doing so).

Shelters & rescues do their fair share as well by providing low-cost
spay/neuter programs, taking in unwanted animals, education, and other
services.

The problem is that most of the dogs produced each year are produced by
people who breed "casually," meaning that they have a female that is in heat
and breed her to the boy down the street for some puppies to sell. They
have no intentions of keeping anything from the litter (usually), nor are
they interested in things like health, whether the puppy will stay in that
home, or any other traits of the breed.

An additional problem is that most puppy buyers do not educate themselves on
dog behavior and training before bringing home the puppy. They also forget
or never know that dogs don't come housebroken, trained, and knowing not to
bite. In addition, many "cute" breeds have some horrendous temperament
issues. Poorly bred Cocker spaniels are common fear biters that are also
dominant within their household. Untrained Rotties can be overprotective
and lack the training to back down when told to. Chows and Shar-Pei are
specifically NOT good first dogs because they are intelligent, protective,
aloof, and independent in one big package. (That equals smarter than owner
+ potentially aggressive + to strangers + doesn't listen well to owner
without training). These are not traits that are across the breed, nor do
any of these breeds typically have aggression issues--but in inexperienced
hands, these four breeds alone can cause major problems within a household.

Just tossing an idea out here, but what if dogs were sold like guns?

There
being a five-day waiting period between placing a purchase of the puppy

and
making the actual purchase. Also during this time, a criminal background
check could be done to insure the puppy isn't turned over to a convicted

pet
abuser or chronic pet abandoner (i.e., ones that only like puppies, get

rid
of them when they become adults, and get another puppy). How about also
requiring them to somehow go and see in person the adult version of the
puppy they're about to buy so the purchase is a more informed purchase?


That would be nice, but responsible breeders already do that. Not the
police check, but they do have waiting periods. Also, the "adult" version
of their breed is usually VERY different from the "adolescent" version. For
example, my experience in Labs. Rusty is a sweet but energetic 8 week old
puppy. Bridge, at 7 months, was a terror--she'd steal off the counters,
jump up, mouthed us, ran off, bad trait, she had it. Bridge at 4 years was
vastly different--obedience trained, well-mannered, housebroken. She's
nothing like she was at 7 months. (Bridge is 10 now.)

~Emily


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.510 / Virus Database: 307 - Release Date: 8/14/2003


  #10  
Old September 5th 03, 04:29 PM
Emily Carroll
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

1) What happens to the dogs after they've been killed by the pound?

The bodies are either incinerated or sold for research. Many of the dog
carcasses that vet students work on are former pets.

2) What is currently being done to reduce dogs from being abandoned by

their
masters?


Not enough to make a difference, unfortunately. Responsible breeders play a
big role by ensuring that any dog they produce has a home for the rest of
it's life, regardless of circumstance, by taking the dog back at any point
in it's life (provided the breeder is alive, knows of the situation, and is
physically capable of doing so).

Shelters & rescues do their fair share as well by providing low-cost
spay/neuter programs, taking in unwanted animals, education, and other
services.

The problem is that most of the dogs produced each year are produced by
people who breed "casually," meaning that they have a female that is in heat
and breed her to the boy down the street for some puppies to sell. They
have no intentions of keeping anything from the litter (usually), nor are
they interested in things like health, whether the puppy will stay in that
home, or any other traits of the breed.

An additional problem is that most puppy buyers do not educate themselves on
dog behavior and training before bringing home the puppy. They also forget
or never know that dogs don't come housebroken, trained, and knowing not to
bite. In addition, many "cute" breeds have some horrendous temperament
issues. Poorly bred Cocker spaniels are common fear biters that are also
dominant within their household. Untrained Rotties can be overprotective
and lack the training to back down when told to. Chows and Shar-Pei are
specifically NOT good first dogs because they are intelligent, protective,
aloof, and independent in one big package. (That equals smarter than owner
+ potentially aggressive + to strangers + doesn't listen well to owner
without training). These are not traits that are across the breed, nor do
any of these breeds typically have aggression issues--but in inexperienced
hands, these four breeds alone can cause major problems within a household.

Just tossing an idea out here, but what if dogs were sold like guns?

There
being a five-day waiting period between placing a purchase of the puppy

and
making the actual purchase. Also during this time, a criminal background
check could be done to insure the puppy isn't turned over to a convicted

pet
abuser or chronic pet abandoner (i.e., ones that only like puppies, get

rid
of them when they become adults, and get another puppy). How about also
requiring them to somehow go and see in person the adult version of the
puppy they're about to buy so the purchase is a more informed purchase?


That would be nice, but responsible breeders already do that. Not the
police check, but they do have waiting periods. Also, the "adult" version
of their breed is usually VERY different from the "adolescent" version. For
example, my experience in Labs. Rusty is a sweet but energetic 8 week old
puppy. Bridge, at 7 months, was a terror--she'd steal off the counters,
jump up, mouthed us, ran off, bad trait, she had it. Bridge at 4 years was
vastly different--obedience trained, well-mannered, housebroken. She's
nothing like she was at 7 months. (Bridge is 10 now.)

~Emily


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.510 / Virus Database: 307 - Release Date: 8/14/2003


 




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