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Need Advice and Help in placing 4 dogs in a no-kill shelter



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 17th 03, 02:34 AM
Tara O.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Need Advice and Help in placing 4 dogs in a no-kill shelter

Rescues and no-kill shelters are not boarding facilities for people who want
to get rid of their dogs for a while and then retrieve them. If one of them
has aggression issues, the dog will likely be rejected or euthanized after
being admitted. I'd strongly recommend doing spot-visits, unannounced, to
any no-kill shelters you consider approaching. There are some really bad
ones out there who are little better than animal hoarders with horrendous
living conditions for the dogs. Alot of no-kill shelters house the dogs in
crates or small kennels 24/7 day in and day out. That's a really good way
to ruin a dog's temperament if its kept in that situation for a long time.

Be realistic about each dog's potential for adoption (because it will be put
up for adoption in the majority of situations). If its a dog who is
unsocialized, has major behavioral issues, has any aggression issues, is
very old and so on, there's a very real possibility that you are
surrendering the dog only to be euthanized by a total stranger. If the dogs
are all highly adoptable then search out a rescue organization(s) but know
that there's virtually no chance of you getting the dog back. There's also
little chance that any of the dogs will be adopted out together.


--
Tara


  #2  
Old September 17th 03, 02:34 AM
Tara O.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Rescues and no-kill shelters are not boarding facilities for people who want
to get rid of their dogs for a while and then retrieve them. If one of them
has aggression issues, the dog will likely be rejected or euthanized after
being admitted. I'd strongly recommend doing spot-visits, unannounced, to
any no-kill shelters you consider approaching. There are some really bad
ones out there who are little better than animal hoarders with horrendous
living conditions for the dogs. Alot of no-kill shelters house the dogs in
crates or small kennels 24/7 day in and day out. That's a really good way
to ruin a dog's temperament if its kept in that situation for a long time.

Be realistic about each dog's potential for adoption (because it will be put
up for adoption in the majority of situations). If its a dog who is
unsocialized, has major behavioral issues, has any aggression issues, is
very old and so on, there's a very real possibility that you are
surrendering the dog only to be euthanized by a total stranger. If the dogs
are all highly adoptable then search out a rescue organization(s) but know
that there's virtually no chance of you getting the dog back. There's also
little chance that any of the dogs will be adopted out together.


--
Tara


  #3  
Old September 17th 03, 02:34 AM
Tara O.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Rescues and no-kill shelters are not boarding facilities for people who want
to get rid of their dogs for a while and then retrieve them. If one of them
has aggression issues, the dog will likely be rejected or euthanized after
being admitted. I'd strongly recommend doing spot-visits, unannounced, to
any no-kill shelters you consider approaching. There are some really bad
ones out there who are little better than animal hoarders with horrendous
living conditions for the dogs. Alot of no-kill shelters house the dogs in
crates or small kennels 24/7 day in and day out. That's a really good way
to ruin a dog's temperament if its kept in that situation for a long time.

Be realistic about each dog's potential for adoption (because it will be put
up for adoption in the majority of situations). If its a dog who is
unsocialized, has major behavioral issues, has any aggression issues, is
very old and so on, there's a very real possibility that you are
surrendering the dog only to be euthanized by a total stranger. If the dogs
are all highly adoptable then search out a rescue organization(s) but know
that there's virtually no chance of you getting the dog back. There's also
little chance that any of the dogs will be adopted out together.


--
Tara


  #4  
Old September 17th 03, 02:44 AM
Tara O.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Tara O." wrote in message
...

Be realistic about each dog's potential for adoption (because it will be

put
up for adoption in the majority of situations). If its a dog who is
unsocialized, has major behavioral issues, has any aggression issues, is
very old and so on, there's a very real possibility that you are
surrendering the dog only to be euthanized by a total stranger.


I should clarify the euthanization part. "No Kill" does not always mean
100% "does not kill." It can mean that they don't euth. on that particular
site or that they don't euth. regularly.

If any of these dogs is not very adoptable by general-public standards for
any reason, placing him/her in a 100% no-kill shelter is sentencing the dog
to an undetermined time in prison IMO. There will be no quality of life for
the dog and if there were pre-existing behavioral issues, you can pretty
much bet that they will only compound during its stay in the shelter. If
one of these dogs is likely to face this kind of fate, I'd hope that you or
your brother would be kind enough to end the dog's life at your own vet.

--
Tara


  #5  
Old September 17th 03, 02:44 AM
Tara O.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Tara O." wrote in message
...

Be realistic about each dog's potential for adoption (because it will be

put
up for adoption in the majority of situations). If its a dog who is
unsocialized, has major behavioral issues, has any aggression issues, is
very old and so on, there's a very real possibility that you are
surrendering the dog only to be euthanized by a total stranger.


I should clarify the euthanization part. "No Kill" does not always mean
100% "does not kill." It can mean that they don't euth. on that particular
site or that they don't euth. regularly.

If any of these dogs is not very adoptable by general-public standards for
any reason, placing him/her in a 100% no-kill shelter is sentencing the dog
to an undetermined time in prison IMO. There will be no quality of life for
the dog and if there were pre-existing behavioral issues, you can pretty
much bet that they will only compound during its stay in the shelter. If
one of these dogs is likely to face this kind of fate, I'd hope that you or
your brother would be kind enough to end the dog's life at your own vet.

--
Tara


  #6  
Old September 17th 03, 02:44 AM
Tara O.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Tara O." wrote in message
...

Be realistic about each dog's potential for adoption (because it will be

put
up for adoption in the majority of situations). If its a dog who is
unsocialized, has major behavioral issues, has any aggression issues, is
very old and so on, there's a very real possibility that you are
surrendering the dog only to be euthanized by a total stranger.


I should clarify the euthanization part. "No Kill" does not always mean
100% "does not kill." It can mean that they don't euth. on that particular
site or that they don't euth. regularly.

If any of these dogs is not very adoptable by general-public standards for
any reason, placing him/her in a 100% no-kill shelter is sentencing the dog
to an undetermined time in prison IMO. There will be no quality of life for
the dog and if there were pre-existing behavioral issues, you can pretty
much bet that they will only compound during its stay in the shelter. If
one of these dogs is likely to face this kind of fate, I'd hope that you or
your brother would be kind enough to end the dog's life at your own vet.

--
Tara


  #7  
Old September 18th 03, 03:28 AM
Marisol Huijon-Rosillo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Tara O." wrote in message ...
"Tara O." wrote in message
...

Be realistic about each dog's potential for adoption (because it will be

put
up for adoption in the majority of situations). If its a dog who is
unsocialized, has major behavioral issues, has any aggression issues, is
very old and so on, there's a very real possibility that you are
surrendering the dog only to be euthanized by a total stranger.


I should clarify the euthanization part. "No Kill" does not always mean
100% "does not kill." It can mean that they don't euth. on that particular
site or that they don't euth. regularly.

If any of these dogs is not very adoptable by general-public standards for
any reason, placing him/her in a 100% no-kill shelter is sentencing the dog
to an undetermined time in prison IMO. There will be no quality of life for
the dog and if there were pre-existing behavioral issues, you can pretty
much bet that they will only compound during its stay in the shelter. If
one of these dogs is likely to face this kind of fate, I'd hope that you or
your brother would be kind enough to end the dog's life at your own vet.



Tara,
Thanks for your response. I am aware of many of the things you
mention so I am not about to place the dogs in just any shelter
without checking it out first. As for your comment that shelters are
not merely boarding places, I am also aware of that. But I am willing
to try to find a place that is understanding of our situation. You do
not know until you ask. Also, I know that there are shelters that
specialize in "unadoptable" pets. I need to clarify that the dog that
I descrbe as "agressive" does not exactly go around biting every human
being it sees. She snarls when we try to get her out of the house and
she did bite me (although did not break the skin) when I stepped on
her accidently). Two of the dogs are quite adoptable, I believe. One
is very shy and takes awhile to warm up to people but is very, very,
sweet. The other is a spunky, playful and pretty young female. This
are the two that I actually want to take when I move if I am in a
situation where I can have them. Anybody else out there with advice
or suggestions? Again, I beleive in asking and trying for something
that might not be the norm. There has to be a solution. And yes,
Tara, I would be kind enough to euthanize the dogs myself if there was
no alternative. Unfortunately, they are not my dogs, but my
brothers'. I would really appreciate a response from other people.
Thanks for reading this.
Sincerely, Marisol
  #8  
Old September 18th 03, 03:28 AM
Marisol Huijon-Rosillo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Tara O." wrote in message ...
"Tara O." wrote in message
...

Be realistic about each dog's potential for adoption (because it will be

put
up for adoption in the majority of situations). If its a dog who is
unsocialized, has major behavioral issues, has any aggression issues, is
very old and so on, there's a very real possibility that you are
surrendering the dog only to be euthanized by a total stranger.


I should clarify the euthanization part. "No Kill" does not always mean
100% "does not kill." It can mean that they don't euth. on that particular
site or that they don't euth. regularly.

If any of these dogs is not very adoptable by general-public standards for
any reason, placing him/her in a 100% no-kill shelter is sentencing the dog
to an undetermined time in prison IMO. There will be no quality of life for
the dog and if there were pre-existing behavioral issues, you can pretty
much bet that they will only compound during its stay in the shelter. If
one of these dogs is likely to face this kind of fate, I'd hope that you or
your brother would be kind enough to end the dog's life at your own vet.



Tara,
Thanks for your response. I am aware of many of the things you
mention so I am not about to place the dogs in just any shelter
without checking it out first. As for your comment that shelters are
not merely boarding places, I am also aware of that. But I am willing
to try to find a place that is understanding of our situation. You do
not know until you ask. Also, I know that there are shelters that
specialize in "unadoptable" pets. I need to clarify that the dog that
I descrbe as "agressive" does not exactly go around biting every human
being it sees. She snarls when we try to get her out of the house and
she did bite me (although did not break the skin) when I stepped on
her accidently). Two of the dogs are quite adoptable, I believe. One
is very shy and takes awhile to warm up to people but is very, very,
sweet. The other is a spunky, playful and pretty young female. This
are the two that I actually want to take when I move if I am in a
situation where I can have them. Anybody else out there with advice
or suggestions? Again, I beleive in asking and trying for something
that might not be the norm. There has to be a solution. And yes,
Tara, I would be kind enough to euthanize the dogs myself if there was
no alternative. Unfortunately, they are not my dogs, but my
brothers'. I would really appreciate a response from other people.
Thanks for reading this.
Sincerely, Marisol
  #9  
Old September 18th 03, 03:28 AM
Marisol Huijon-Rosillo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Tara O." wrote in message ...
"Tara O." wrote in message
...

Be realistic about each dog's potential for adoption (because it will be

put
up for adoption in the majority of situations). If its a dog who is
unsocialized, has major behavioral issues, has any aggression issues, is
very old and so on, there's a very real possibility that you are
surrendering the dog only to be euthanized by a total stranger.


I should clarify the euthanization part. "No Kill" does not always mean
100% "does not kill." It can mean that they don't euth. on that particular
site or that they don't euth. regularly.

If any of these dogs is not very adoptable by general-public standards for
any reason, placing him/her in a 100% no-kill shelter is sentencing the dog
to an undetermined time in prison IMO. There will be no quality of life for
the dog and if there were pre-existing behavioral issues, you can pretty
much bet that they will only compound during its stay in the shelter. If
one of these dogs is likely to face this kind of fate, I'd hope that you or
your brother would be kind enough to end the dog's life at your own vet.



Tara,
Thanks for your response. I am aware of many of the things you
mention so I am not about to place the dogs in just any shelter
without checking it out first. As for your comment that shelters are
not merely boarding places, I am also aware of that. But I am willing
to try to find a place that is understanding of our situation. You do
not know until you ask. Also, I know that there are shelters that
specialize in "unadoptable" pets. I need to clarify that the dog that
I descrbe as "agressive" does not exactly go around biting every human
being it sees. She snarls when we try to get her out of the house and
she did bite me (although did not break the skin) when I stepped on
her accidently). Two of the dogs are quite adoptable, I believe. One
is very shy and takes awhile to warm up to people but is very, very,
sweet. The other is a spunky, playful and pretty young female. This
are the two that I actually want to take when I move if I am in a
situation where I can have them. Anybody else out there with advice
or suggestions? Again, I beleive in asking and trying for something
that might not be the norm. There has to be a solution. And yes,
Tara, I would be kind enough to euthanize the dogs myself if there was
no alternative. Unfortunately, they are not my dogs, but my
brothers'. I would really appreciate a response from other people.
Thanks for reading this.
Sincerely, Marisol
  #10  
Old September 18th 03, 08:20 AM
catherine yronwode
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Marisol Huijon-Rosillo wrote:

Unfortunately, they are not my dogs, but my
brothers'. I would really appreciate a response from other people.


There's your problem in a nutshell. They are not your dogs.
Your brother needs to agree to anything you wish done. DO
you actually have his agreement to place the dogs elsewhere?

cat yronwode
 




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