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My experiences with finding the right dog



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 13th 03, 02:25 AM
Rich Spencer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default My experiences with finding the right dog

I thought I would post this to see if others are in this same situation
and also to allow those in shelters and rescue societies to know at
least what some of us are thinking.

We recently lost our 9 year old Basset (whom we got from a Basset rescue
group and were very good and helpful) and decided to get another smaller
dog. We were looking for a dog that was medium size, less than 50 lbs.
and wanted an older dog (1 to 6 years of age). Although we had several
breeds in mind, we would also be open to a mutt as long as he or she was
affectionate and good with our two daughters.

We thought that this would be a relatively simple process but were
surprised at all the hoops that we had to jump through. We looked at
the local shelters to begin with thinking that we would have a good
chance of finding our dog since we didn't want a puppy. What we found
was that many of the dog were either much older than we wanted or
shepard, dobe or lab mixes. Most of the dogs in fact were larger dogs.
Many of the shelters would also not adopt dogs to those of us without a
fenced in yard. In out town, that eliminates about 60-70% of the homes.
I know that from talking to others that many people lie about this but I
didn't feel that I should have to lie to get a dog. When I was with our
basset, I either had him on lead outside or was next to him when he did
his business.

I then looked at several rescue organizations since we had good luck
with the basset rescue. I couldn't believe some of the requirements
that some of these groups had. While many had the fenced in yard
requirement and home visits (the home visits could be a good idea) some
groups insisted that I feed the dog a wholistic diet and even one rescue
group insisted that they would not allow a dog to be adopted if the
owner would not agree to feed a diet of raw meat and bones to the dog.

I eventually found a breeder who had the dog for me. He was an
excellent breeder who just happened to have a dog that he was retiring
and it worked out well. The dog got along fine with the kids and we are
very happy with our decision. He checked us out by viewing our family
and how we interacted with the dog and vis versa.

I realize that there are people who try to adopt who shouldn't and that
some people's motivations to adopt aren't what they should be. However,
many of these restrictions only serve to discourage dog ownership and
force people to go to backyard breeders As an adoptive parent, we went
through many hurdles including home studies, background checks and the
like and have had to deal with requirements that just seem to make no
sense. I would encourage shelters and rescue groups to have standards
but also to be realistic. Good dog owners can have non-fenced in yards
and feed dogs Iams dog food. Don't eliminate people who would like to
adopt a dog just because they don't fit into your ideal dog owner
profile.

Just my 2 cents - your mileage may vary
  #2  
Old October 13th 03, 03:23 AM
Sunni12
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I thought I would post this to see if others are in this same situation
and also to allow those in shelters and rescue societies to know at
least what some of us are thinking.

We recently lost our 9 year old Basset (whom we got from a Basset rescue
group and were very good and helpful) and decided to get another smaller
dog. We were looking for a dog that was medium size, less than 50 lbs.
and wanted an older dog (1 to 6 years of age). Although we had several
breeds in mind, we would also be open to a mutt as long as he or she was
affectionate and good with our two daughters.

We thought that this would be a relatively simple process but were
surprised at all the hoops that we had to jump through. We looked at
the local shelters to begin with thinking that we would have a good
chance of finding our dog since we didn't want a puppy. What we found
was that many of the dog were either much older than we wanted or
shepard, dobe or lab mixes. Most of the dogs in fact were larger dogs.
Many of the shelters would also not adopt dogs to those of us without a
fenced in yard. In out town, that eliminates about 60-70% of the homes.
I know that from talking to others that many people lie about this but I
didn't feel that I should have to lie to get a dog. When I was with our
basset, I either had him on lead outside or was next to him when he did
his business.

I then looked at several rescue organizations since we had good luck
with the basset rescue. I couldn't believe some of the requirements
that some of these groups had. While many had the fenced in yard
requirement and home visits (the home visits could be a good idea) some
groups insisted that I feed the dog a wholistic diet and even one rescue
group insisted that they would not allow a dog to be adopted if the
owner would not agree to feed a diet of raw meat and bones to the dog.

I eventually found a breeder who had the dog for me. He was an
excellent breeder who just happened to have a dog that he was retiring
and it worked out well. The dog got along fine with the kids and we are
very happy with our decision. He checked us out by viewing our family
and how we interacted with the dog and vis versa.

I realize that there are people who try to adopt who shouldn't and that
some people's motivations to adopt aren't what they should be. However,
many of these restrictions only serve to discourage dog ownership and
force people to go to backyard breeders As an adoptive parent, we went
through many hurdles including home studies, background checks and the
like and have had to deal with requirements that just seem to make no
sense. I would encourage shelters and rescue groups to have standards
but also to be realistic. Good dog owners can have non-fenced in yards
and feed dogs Iams dog food. Don't eliminate people who would like to
adopt a dog just because they don't fit into your ideal dog owner
profile.



We adopted a beagle a few weeks ago, and a Pom a few days ago. We wanted a dog
under 30 lbs that was past puppyhood.
We found that most of the dogs in the shelters were the larger kind or breeds
with bad reputations. It took us a few weeks. There are about 10 shelters that
were feasable for us to adopt from. I called them every other day looking for a
dog that would like to be part of our family, and finally found the right ones.

I found that rescue orgs had the toughest requirements. We have a very large
yard, but no fence either. Our dogs live inside but go for leash walks and have
50 foot leads so the can play in the yard (always supervised) Our local Humane
societies and pounds have reasonable requirements and adoption fees. We live in
a fairly small town and our local rescue sent the Beagle home with us the same
day - with no checks because my father in law is pretty well known in the
community. Our Pom came from the Humane society in a nearby city. The
application was basic and reasonable. The fee was only $75 which included
spaying, shots, tags, food/water dish, collar and leash, 2#s of Iams, a sqeak
toy, a a free vet visit. The vet visit ended up including a month of Heartguard
and flea preventitive.

My only real complaint was with a local no kill shelter. The had a dog that was
going to be hard to place because she was a senior ands was being treated for
heartworms. We wanted to adopt her, but she just didnt seem to like us - didnt
dislike - but didnt like either. They were 1 dog over capacity so we offered to
foster her. We thought she would at least get out of the shelter and if she
warmed to us and wanted to stay, we would have gone ahead and adopted her. They
turned us down saying that if she wasnt on the premises, she would be even
harder to place. This was a month ago, and she is still at the shelter. I feel
so sad for her.

-sunny
  #3  
Old October 13th 03, 03:23 AM
Sunni12
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I thought I would post this to see if others are in this same situation
and also to allow those in shelters and rescue societies to know at
least what some of us are thinking.

We recently lost our 9 year old Basset (whom we got from a Basset rescue
group and were very good and helpful) and decided to get another smaller
dog. We were looking for a dog that was medium size, less than 50 lbs.
and wanted an older dog (1 to 6 years of age). Although we had several
breeds in mind, we would also be open to a mutt as long as he or she was
affectionate and good with our two daughters.

We thought that this would be a relatively simple process but were
surprised at all the hoops that we had to jump through. We looked at
the local shelters to begin with thinking that we would have a good
chance of finding our dog since we didn't want a puppy. What we found
was that many of the dog were either much older than we wanted or
shepard, dobe or lab mixes. Most of the dogs in fact were larger dogs.
Many of the shelters would also not adopt dogs to those of us without a
fenced in yard. In out town, that eliminates about 60-70% of the homes.
I know that from talking to others that many people lie about this but I
didn't feel that I should have to lie to get a dog. When I was with our
basset, I either had him on lead outside or was next to him when he did
his business.

I then looked at several rescue organizations since we had good luck
with the basset rescue. I couldn't believe some of the requirements
that some of these groups had. While many had the fenced in yard
requirement and home visits (the home visits could be a good idea) some
groups insisted that I feed the dog a wholistic diet and even one rescue
group insisted that they would not allow a dog to be adopted if the
owner would not agree to feed a diet of raw meat and bones to the dog.

I eventually found a breeder who had the dog for me. He was an
excellent breeder who just happened to have a dog that he was retiring
and it worked out well. The dog got along fine with the kids and we are
very happy with our decision. He checked us out by viewing our family
and how we interacted with the dog and vis versa.

I realize that there are people who try to adopt who shouldn't and that
some people's motivations to adopt aren't what they should be. However,
many of these restrictions only serve to discourage dog ownership and
force people to go to backyard breeders As an adoptive parent, we went
through many hurdles including home studies, background checks and the
like and have had to deal with requirements that just seem to make no
sense. I would encourage shelters and rescue groups to have standards
but also to be realistic. Good dog owners can have non-fenced in yards
and feed dogs Iams dog food. Don't eliminate people who would like to
adopt a dog just because they don't fit into your ideal dog owner
profile.



We adopted a beagle a few weeks ago, and a Pom a few days ago. We wanted a dog
under 30 lbs that was past puppyhood.
We found that most of the dogs in the shelters were the larger kind or breeds
with bad reputations. It took us a few weeks. There are about 10 shelters that
were feasable for us to adopt from. I called them every other day looking for a
dog that would like to be part of our family, and finally found the right ones.

I found that rescue orgs had the toughest requirements. We have a very large
yard, but no fence either. Our dogs live inside but go for leash walks and have
50 foot leads so the can play in the yard (always supervised) Our local Humane
societies and pounds have reasonable requirements and adoption fees. We live in
a fairly small town and our local rescue sent the Beagle home with us the same
day - with no checks because my father in law is pretty well known in the
community. Our Pom came from the Humane society in a nearby city. The
application was basic and reasonable. The fee was only $75 which included
spaying, shots, tags, food/water dish, collar and leash, 2#s of Iams, a sqeak
toy, a a free vet visit. The vet visit ended up including a month of Heartguard
and flea preventitive.

My only real complaint was with a local no kill shelter. The had a dog that was
going to be hard to place because she was a senior ands was being treated for
heartworms. We wanted to adopt her, but she just didnt seem to like us - didnt
dislike - but didnt like either. They were 1 dog over capacity so we offered to
foster her. We thought she would at least get out of the shelter and if she
warmed to us and wanted to stay, we would have gone ahead and adopted her. They
turned us down saying that if she wasnt on the premises, she would be even
harder to place. This was a month ago, and she is still at the shelter. I feel
so sad for her.

-sunny
  #4  
Old October 13th 03, 03:23 AM
Sunni12
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I thought I would post this to see if others are in this same situation
and also to allow those in shelters and rescue societies to know at
least what some of us are thinking.

We recently lost our 9 year old Basset (whom we got from a Basset rescue
group and were very good and helpful) and decided to get another smaller
dog. We were looking for a dog that was medium size, less than 50 lbs.
and wanted an older dog (1 to 6 years of age). Although we had several
breeds in mind, we would also be open to a mutt as long as he or she was
affectionate and good with our two daughters.

We thought that this would be a relatively simple process but were
surprised at all the hoops that we had to jump through. We looked at
the local shelters to begin with thinking that we would have a good
chance of finding our dog since we didn't want a puppy. What we found
was that many of the dog were either much older than we wanted or
shepard, dobe or lab mixes. Most of the dogs in fact were larger dogs.
Many of the shelters would also not adopt dogs to those of us without a
fenced in yard. In out town, that eliminates about 60-70% of the homes.
I know that from talking to others that many people lie about this but I
didn't feel that I should have to lie to get a dog. When I was with our
basset, I either had him on lead outside or was next to him when he did
his business.

I then looked at several rescue organizations since we had good luck
with the basset rescue. I couldn't believe some of the requirements
that some of these groups had. While many had the fenced in yard
requirement and home visits (the home visits could be a good idea) some
groups insisted that I feed the dog a wholistic diet and even one rescue
group insisted that they would not allow a dog to be adopted if the
owner would not agree to feed a diet of raw meat and bones to the dog.

I eventually found a breeder who had the dog for me. He was an
excellent breeder who just happened to have a dog that he was retiring
and it worked out well. The dog got along fine with the kids and we are
very happy with our decision. He checked us out by viewing our family
and how we interacted with the dog and vis versa.

I realize that there are people who try to adopt who shouldn't and that
some people's motivations to adopt aren't what they should be. However,
many of these restrictions only serve to discourage dog ownership and
force people to go to backyard breeders As an adoptive parent, we went
through many hurdles including home studies, background checks and the
like and have had to deal with requirements that just seem to make no
sense. I would encourage shelters and rescue groups to have standards
but also to be realistic. Good dog owners can have non-fenced in yards
and feed dogs Iams dog food. Don't eliminate people who would like to
adopt a dog just because they don't fit into your ideal dog owner
profile.



We adopted a beagle a few weeks ago, and a Pom a few days ago. We wanted a dog
under 30 lbs that was past puppyhood.
We found that most of the dogs in the shelters were the larger kind or breeds
with bad reputations. It took us a few weeks. There are about 10 shelters that
were feasable for us to adopt from. I called them every other day looking for a
dog that would like to be part of our family, and finally found the right ones.

I found that rescue orgs had the toughest requirements. We have a very large
yard, but no fence either. Our dogs live inside but go for leash walks and have
50 foot leads so the can play in the yard (always supervised) Our local Humane
societies and pounds have reasonable requirements and adoption fees. We live in
a fairly small town and our local rescue sent the Beagle home with us the same
day - with no checks because my father in law is pretty well known in the
community. Our Pom came from the Humane society in a nearby city. The
application was basic and reasonable. The fee was only $75 which included
spaying, shots, tags, food/water dish, collar and leash, 2#s of Iams, a sqeak
toy, a a free vet visit. The vet visit ended up including a month of Heartguard
and flea preventitive.

My only real complaint was with a local no kill shelter. The had a dog that was
going to be hard to place because she was a senior ands was being treated for
heartworms. We wanted to adopt her, but she just didnt seem to like us - didnt
dislike - but didnt like either. They were 1 dog over capacity so we offered to
foster her. We thought she would at least get out of the shelter and if she
warmed to us and wanted to stay, we would have gone ahead and adopted her. They
turned us down saying that if she wasnt on the premises, she would be even
harder to place. This was a month ago, and she is still at the shelter. I feel
so sad for her.

-sunny
  #5  
Old October 13th 03, 03:52 AM
Tara O.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I don't think a rescue organization, or even a breeder, should *require* a
particular form of diet as long as the dog doesn't have special dietary
needs..like dogs with irritable bowel syndrome or food allergies. Each
rescue operates differently even if they are operating within the same
breed. There does tend to be alot of micromanagement going on but

a. the rescue has the ability to mircomanage
b. the rescue has its own ideas on what's best for the dogs
c. while its not optimal to keep dogs in rescue for a long time, the space &
time are there so turning away homes isn't detrimental to the dog

The fence issue is pretty standard although IME exceptions are made on an
individual basis. Since alot of dogs wind up in shelters because they were
loose and roaming, wanting a family to have a fence for containment makes
sense. Alot of people tend to just let the dog out when weather stinks or
something else is going on inside the home. If no fence is in place then
there's a possibility that as soon as a back is turned, the dog runs off.
Some breeds are more prone to roaming as well, either following a scent,
chasing another animal, or just to go looking for fun.

Anyway, the point is that rescues will have good reasons for having the
requirements they do, that doesn't mean the general public will agree with
them though. Their primary goal, contrary to popular belief, isn't just to
place dogs in adoptive homes. The primary goal is to place dogs in
"forever" homes which means that more is required than just offering
food/water/shelter. This is where the individual rescue's ideas of what
constitutes a "forever" home comes into play.

--
Tara


  #6  
Old October 13th 03, 03:52 AM
Tara O.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I don't think a rescue organization, or even a breeder, should *require* a
particular form of diet as long as the dog doesn't have special dietary
needs..like dogs with irritable bowel syndrome or food allergies. Each
rescue operates differently even if they are operating within the same
breed. There does tend to be alot of micromanagement going on but

a. the rescue has the ability to mircomanage
b. the rescue has its own ideas on what's best for the dogs
c. while its not optimal to keep dogs in rescue for a long time, the space &
time are there so turning away homes isn't detrimental to the dog

The fence issue is pretty standard although IME exceptions are made on an
individual basis. Since alot of dogs wind up in shelters because they were
loose and roaming, wanting a family to have a fence for containment makes
sense. Alot of people tend to just let the dog out when weather stinks or
something else is going on inside the home. If no fence is in place then
there's a possibility that as soon as a back is turned, the dog runs off.
Some breeds are more prone to roaming as well, either following a scent,
chasing another animal, or just to go looking for fun.

Anyway, the point is that rescues will have good reasons for having the
requirements they do, that doesn't mean the general public will agree with
them though. Their primary goal, contrary to popular belief, isn't just to
place dogs in adoptive homes. The primary goal is to place dogs in
"forever" homes which means that more is required than just offering
food/water/shelter. This is where the individual rescue's ideas of what
constitutes a "forever" home comes into play.

--
Tara


  #7  
Old October 13th 03, 03:52 AM
Tara O.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I don't think a rescue organization, or even a breeder, should *require* a
particular form of diet as long as the dog doesn't have special dietary
needs..like dogs with irritable bowel syndrome or food allergies. Each
rescue operates differently even if they are operating within the same
breed. There does tend to be alot of micromanagement going on but

a. the rescue has the ability to mircomanage
b. the rescue has its own ideas on what's best for the dogs
c. while its not optimal to keep dogs in rescue for a long time, the space &
time are there so turning away homes isn't detrimental to the dog

The fence issue is pretty standard although IME exceptions are made on an
individual basis. Since alot of dogs wind up in shelters because they were
loose and roaming, wanting a family to have a fence for containment makes
sense. Alot of people tend to just let the dog out when weather stinks or
something else is going on inside the home. If no fence is in place then
there's a possibility that as soon as a back is turned, the dog runs off.
Some breeds are more prone to roaming as well, either following a scent,
chasing another animal, or just to go looking for fun.

Anyway, the point is that rescues will have good reasons for having the
requirements they do, that doesn't mean the general public will agree with
them though. Their primary goal, contrary to popular belief, isn't just to
place dogs in adoptive homes. The primary goal is to place dogs in
"forever" homes which means that more is required than just offering
food/water/shelter. This is where the individual rescue's ideas of what
constitutes a "forever" home comes into play.

--
Tara


  #8  
Old October 13th 03, 05:34 AM
Andrea
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Rich Spencer" wrote
snip
However,
many of these restrictions only serve to discourage dog ownership and
force people to go to backyard breeders


Some thoughts: A rescue's job is not to encourage dog ownership. It is to
find the best home for the individual dogs in their care. A rescue cannot
force anyone to do anything, especially not go to a BYB. If you can't find a
good rescue, you can buy from a /responsible/ breeder. Or keep looking.

As an adoptive parent, we went
through many hurdles including home studies, background checks and the
like and have had to deal with requirements that just seem to make no
sense.


They may not make sense to you, but often times there is a reason for these
"rules". I find the idea of a rescue requiring a BARF diet for all their
dogs a bit extreme. Could it have been just certain dogs? Some dogs need
special diets for health reasons. (Case in point, my friend's Basenji who
can *only* eat his diet of baked fish and potato, homemade.) If not, that's
a little wierd, but I guess it's their perogotive.

I would encourage shelters and rescue groups to have standards
but also to be realistic. Good dog owners can have non-fenced in yards
and feed dogs Iams dog food.


Most good rescues have policies but can be flexible too. Not all rescue's
are good, though. Some are overly lax and place dogs poorly, or have a poor
support support systems for their folks and adoptors. Better to make
adoption more difficult that put the poor dog through another rehoming.

Hope you're happy with your new pet!

--
-Andrea Stone
Saorsa Basenjis
http://home1.gte.net/res0s12z/
The Trolls Nest - greenmen, goblins & gargoyle wall art
www.trollsnest.com


  #9  
Old October 13th 03, 05:34 AM
Andrea
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Rich Spencer" wrote
snip
However,
many of these restrictions only serve to discourage dog ownership and
force people to go to backyard breeders


Some thoughts: A rescue's job is not to encourage dog ownership. It is to
find the best home for the individual dogs in their care. A rescue cannot
force anyone to do anything, especially not go to a BYB. If you can't find a
good rescue, you can buy from a /responsible/ breeder. Or keep looking.

As an adoptive parent, we went
through many hurdles including home studies, background checks and the
like and have had to deal with requirements that just seem to make no
sense.


They may not make sense to you, but often times there is a reason for these
"rules". I find the idea of a rescue requiring a BARF diet for all their
dogs a bit extreme. Could it have been just certain dogs? Some dogs need
special diets for health reasons. (Case in point, my friend's Basenji who
can *only* eat his diet of baked fish and potato, homemade.) If not, that's
a little wierd, but I guess it's their perogotive.

I would encourage shelters and rescue groups to have standards
but also to be realistic. Good dog owners can have non-fenced in yards
and feed dogs Iams dog food.


Most good rescues have policies but can be flexible too. Not all rescue's
are good, though. Some are overly lax and place dogs poorly, or have a poor
support support systems for their folks and adoptors. Better to make
adoption more difficult that put the poor dog through another rehoming.

Hope you're happy with your new pet!

--
-Andrea Stone
Saorsa Basenjis
http://home1.gte.net/res0s12z/
The Trolls Nest - greenmen, goblins & gargoyle wall art
www.trollsnest.com


  #10  
Old October 13th 03, 05:34 AM
Andrea
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Rich Spencer" wrote
snip
However,
many of these restrictions only serve to discourage dog ownership and
force people to go to backyard breeders


Some thoughts: A rescue's job is not to encourage dog ownership. It is to
find the best home for the individual dogs in their care. A rescue cannot
force anyone to do anything, especially not go to a BYB. If you can't find a
good rescue, you can buy from a /responsible/ breeder. Or keep looking.

As an adoptive parent, we went
through many hurdles including home studies, background checks and the
like and have had to deal with requirements that just seem to make no
sense.


They may not make sense to you, but often times there is a reason for these
"rules". I find the idea of a rescue requiring a BARF diet for all their
dogs a bit extreme. Could it have been just certain dogs? Some dogs need
special diets for health reasons. (Case in point, my friend's Basenji who
can *only* eat his diet of baked fish and potato, homemade.) If not, that's
a little wierd, but I guess it's their perogotive.

I would encourage shelters and rescue groups to have standards
but also to be realistic. Good dog owners can have non-fenced in yards
and feed dogs Iams dog food.


Most good rescues have policies but can be flexible too. Not all rescue's
are good, though. Some are overly lax and place dogs poorly, or have a poor
support support systems for their folks and adoptors. Better to make
adoption more difficult that put the poor dog through another rehoming.

Hope you're happy with your new pet!

--
-Andrea Stone
Saorsa Basenjis
http://home1.gte.net/res0s12z/
The Trolls Nest - greenmen, goblins & gargoyle wall art
www.trollsnest.com


 




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