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FDA Approves 1st Anti-Obesity Drug for Dogs



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 7th 07, 04:12 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health,rec.pets.dogs.behavior
Steven L.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default FDA Approves 1st Anti-Obesity Drug for Dogs

Pfizer Medication for Obese Dogs Wins U.S. Approval (Update4)

By Justin Blum

Jan. 5 (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. approved the first prescription
weight-loss drug for the growing number of dogs whose owners feed them
too many scraps and treats.

The Food and Drug Administration today cleared Pfizer Inc. to market a
drug called Slentrol for use in the estimated 5 percent of U.S. dogs
that are obese. Veterinarians also could use it for the additional 20
percent to 30 percent that are overweight.

The medication, which Pfizer estimates will cost pet owners about $1 to
$2 a day, could be used for the increasing population of dogs with
weight problems due to overfeeding and lack of exercise, said George C.
Fahey Jr., a professor of animal sciences at the University of Illinois
at Urbana- Champaign who specializes in pet nutrition. As with humans,
obesity can lead to diabetes along with heart and joint problems.

``It would be helpful,'' Fahey said of Slentrol in a telephone interview
today. ``It would be more helpful if people could feed their dogs less.
That would be turning off the spigot instead of mopping the floor. Not
everybody's going to do that.''

Dogs that are 20 percent more than their ideal weight are considered
obese. The FDA approved the medication for those dogs, Pfizer said,
though veterinarians are free to give it to dogs classified as
overweight. It will be dispensed only by veterinarians and is expected
to be available in the spring, Pfizer said.

61.5 Million Dogs

There are about 61.5 million pet dogs in the U.S., according to the
American Veterinary Medical Association, based in Schaumburg, Illinois.

The FDA warned Slentrol can cause dogs to vomit and experience loose
stools, diarrhea, lethargy and loss of appetite.

The medication will include a warning saying the drug isn't to be used
by humans, and Pfizer said it shouldn't be used for cats.

Pfizer originally studied the drug for use in humans to lower
cholesterol, said Bob Fauteux, a spokesman for New York- based Pfizer.
The company discovered it could be used in dogs and gave up on human uses.

The drug makes it easier for owners -- many of whom are overweight
themselves -- to reduce the amount of food their pets consume, said
Debra Zoran, who ran a clinical trial for Pfizer and is a professor of
animal medicine at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas.

Begging and Stealing Food

``You start to take away the calories from the animal and they beg and
they steal food and they take food from the trash,'' Zoran said in an
interview. With the drug, she said, owners were able to feed their dogs
less ``without having a fight.''

When dogs become overweight, it can hurt them to walk and exercise,
resulting in more weight gain, she said. Overweight dogs also can
develop arthritis and hip dysplasia.

The drug reduces appetite and fat absorption to produce weight loss,
according to the FDA. It blocks the assembly and release of lipoproteins
into the bloodstream.

Dog owners can give the liquid medicine directly or by adding it to
food. It is to be given in varying amounts, with an initial dose for 14
days. A veterinarian will determine the dog's progress on a monthly
basis and adjust the dose depending on weight loss, the FDA said.

After a dog reaches the desired weight, Pfizer suggests continued use
for three months while the best level of food and exercise are
determined, the FDA said.

Shares of New York-based Pfizer fell 8 cents to $26.30 at 4 p.m. in New
York Stock Exchange composite trading.

To contact the reporter on this story: Justin Blum in Washington at
.
Last Updated: January 5, 2007 16:04 EST

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?p...1k&refer=home#


--
Steven D. Litvintchouk
Email:
Remove the NOSPAM before replying to me.
  #2  
Old January 7th 07, 07:32 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health,rec.pets.dogs.behavior
crosem
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12
Default FDA Approves 1st Anti-Obesity Drug for Dogs

it is well w/in the capabilities of the individual dog's companion to
control both food intake and exercise, hence, the mere existence of
this pill offends me.

Steven L. wrote:
Pfizer Medication for Obese Dogs Wins U.S. Approval (Update4)

By Justin Blum

Jan. 5 (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. approved the first prescription
weight-loss drug for the growing number of dogs whose owners feed them
too many scraps and treats.

The Food and Drug Administration today cleared Pfizer Inc. to market a
drug called Slentrol for use in the estimated 5 percent of U.S. dogs
that are obese. Veterinarians also could use it for the additional 20
percent to 30 percent that are overweight.

The medication, which Pfizer estimates will cost pet owners about $1 to
$2 a day, could be used for the increasing population of dogs with
weight problems due to overfeeding and lack of exercise, said George C.
Fahey Jr., a professor of animal sciences at the University of Illinois
at Urbana- Champaign who specializes in pet nutrition. As with humans,
obesity can lead to diabetes along with heart and joint problems.

``It would be helpful,'' Fahey said of Slentrol in a telephone interview
today. ``It would be more helpful if people could feed their dogs less.
That would be turning off the spigot instead of mopping the floor. Not
everybody's going to do that.''

Dogs that are 20 percent more than their ideal weight are considered
obese. The FDA approved the medication for those dogs, Pfizer said,
though veterinarians are free to give it to dogs classified as
overweight. It will be dispensed only by veterinarians and is expected
to be available in the spring, Pfizer said.

61.5 Million Dogs

There are about 61.5 million pet dogs in the U.S., according to the
American Veterinary Medical Association, based in Schaumburg, Illinois.

The FDA warned Slentrol can cause dogs to vomit and experience loose
stools, diarrhea, lethargy and loss of appetite.

The medication will include a warning saying the drug isn't to be used
by humans, and Pfizer said it shouldn't be used for cats.

Pfizer originally studied the drug for use in humans to lower
cholesterol, said Bob Fauteux, a spokesman for New York- based Pfizer.
The company discovered it could be used in dogs and gave up on human uses.

The drug makes it easier for owners -- many of whom are overweight
themselves -- to reduce the amount of food their pets consume, said
Debra Zoran, who ran a clinical trial for Pfizer and is a professor of
animal medicine at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas.

Begging and Stealing Food

``You start to take away the calories from the animal and they beg and
they steal food and they take food from the trash,'' Zoran said in an
interview. With the drug, she said, owners were able to feed their dogs
less ``without having a fight.''

When dogs become overweight, it can hurt them to walk and exercise,
resulting in more weight gain, she said. Overweight dogs also can
develop arthritis and hip dysplasia.

The drug reduces appetite and fat absorption to produce weight loss,
according to the FDA. It blocks the assembly and release of lipoproteins
into the bloodstream.

Dog owners can give the liquid medicine directly or by adding it to
food. It is to be given in varying amounts, with an initial dose for 14
days. A veterinarian will determine the dog's progress on a monthly
basis and adjust the dose depending on weight loss, the FDA said.

After a dog reaches the desired weight, Pfizer suggests continued use
for three months while the best level of food and exercise are
determined, the FDA said.

Shares of New York-based Pfizer fell 8 cents to $26.30 at 4 p.m. in New
York Stock Exchange composite trading.

To contact the reporter on this story: Justin Blum in Washington at
.
Last Updated: January 5, 2007 16:04 EST

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?p...1k&refer=home#


--
Steven D. Litvintchouk
Email:
Remove the NOSPAM before replying to me.


  #3  
Old January 8th 07, 12:17 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health,rec.pets.dogs.behavior
buglady
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 863
Default FDA Approves 1st Anti-Obesity Drug for Dogs


"crosem" wrote in message
oups.com...
it is well w/in the capabilities of the individual dog's companion to
control both food intake and exercise, hence, the mere existence of
this pill offends me.


..........I'll second that. Not to mention medical reasons for obesity and
being a couch potato like thyoid problems could easily be overlooked.

buglady
take out the dog before replying


  #4  
Old January 8th 07, 01:47 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health,rec.pets.dogs.behavior
Drachen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 74
Default FDA Approves 1st Anti-Obesity Drug for Dogs

quite true... I had a slightly heavier than average lab once winter came
about and walks were less common, a slight decreas in her food and more
excersize time slimmed her right back down to her regular weight... just
took more sunday long haul walks, than daily ones which were not quite that
easy to do with a sick boy...

*his dad has him on weekends, so we reallyl had fun at the dog park*

"crosem" wrote in message
oups.com...
it is well w/in the capabilities of the individual dog's companion to
control both food intake and exercise, hence, the mere existence of
this pill offends me.

Steven L. wrote:
Pfizer Medication for Obese Dogs Wins U.S. Approval (Update4)

By Justin Blum

Jan. 5 (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. approved the first prescription
weight-loss drug for the growing number of dogs whose owners feed them
too many scraps and treats.

The Food and Drug Administration today cleared Pfizer Inc. to market a
drug called Slentrol for use in the estimated 5 percent of U.S. dogs
that are obese. Veterinarians also could use it for the additional 20
percent to 30 percent that are overweight.

The medication, which Pfizer estimates will cost pet owners about $1 to
$2 a day, could be used for the increasing population of dogs with
weight problems due to overfeeding and lack of exercise, said George C.
Fahey Jr., a professor of animal sciences at the University of Illinois
at Urbana- Champaign who specializes in pet nutrition. As with humans,
obesity can lead to diabetes along with heart and joint problems.

``It would be helpful,'' Fahey said of Slentrol in a telephone interview
today. ``It would be more helpful if people could feed their dogs less.
That would be turning off the spigot instead of mopping the floor. Not
everybody's going to do that.''

Dogs that are 20 percent more than their ideal weight are considered
obese. The FDA approved the medication for those dogs, Pfizer said,
though veterinarians are free to give it to dogs classified as
overweight. It will be dispensed only by veterinarians and is expected
to be available in the spring, Pfizer said.

61.5 Million Dogs

There are about 61.5 million pet dogs in the U.S., according to the
American Veterinary Medical Association, based in Schaumburg, Illinois.

The FDA warned Slentrol can cause dogs to vomit and experience loose
stools, diarrhea, lethargy and loss of appetite.

The medication will include a warning saying the drug isn't to be used
by humans, and Pfizer said it shouldn't be used for cats.

Pfizer originally studied the drug for use in humans to lower
cholesterol, said Bob Fauteux, a spokesman for New York- based Pfizer.
The company discovered it could be used in dogs and gave up on human

uses.

The drug makes it easier for owners -- many of whom are overweight
themselves -- to reduce the amount of food their pets consume, said
Debra Zoran, who ran a clinical trial for Pfizer and is a professor of
animal medicine at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas.

Begging and Stealing Food

``You start to take away the calories from the animal and they beg and
they steal food and they take food from the trash,'' Zoran said in an
interview. With the drug, she said, owners were able to feed their dogs
less ``without having a fight.''

When dogs become overweight, it can hurt them to walk and exercise,
resulting in more weight gain, she said. Overweight dogs also can
develop arthritis and hip dysplasia.

The drug reduces appetite and fat absorption to produce weight loss,
according to the FDA. It blocks the assembly and release of lipoproteins
into the bloodstream.

Dog owners can give the liquid medicine directly or by adding it to
food. It is to be given in varying amounts, with an initial dose for 14
days. A veterinarian will determine the dog's progress on a monthly
basis and adjust the dose depending on weight loss, the FDA said.

After a dog reaches the desired weight, Pfizer suggests continued use
for three months while the best level of food and exercise are
determined, the FDA said.

Shares of New York-based Pfizer fell 8 cents to $26.30 at 4 p.m. in New
York Stock Exchange composite trading.

To contact the reporter on this story: Justin Blum in Washington at
.
Last Updated: January 5, 2007 16:04 EST


http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?p...1k&refer=home#


--
Steven D. Litvintchouk
Email:
Remove the NOSPAM before replying to me.




  #5  
Old January 8th 07, 04:59 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health,rec.pets.dogs.behavior
Lynne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,609
Default FDA Approves 1st Anti-Obesity Drug for Dogs

on Mon, 08 Jan 2007 13:47:37 GMT, "Drachen" wrote:

quite true... I had a slightly heavier than average lab once winter
came about and walks were less common, a slight decreas in her food
and more excersize time slimmed her right back down to her regular
weight... just took more sunday long haul walks, than daily ones which
were not quite that easy to do with a sick boy...


I'm curious about your dog's ability to sense your son's seizures before
they happen. Did you know this dog had that skill before you got him?

--
Lynne
  #6  
Old January 8th 07, 05:33 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health,rec.pets.dogs.behavior
Sharon Too
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 664
Default FDA Approves 1st Anti-Obesity Drug for Dogs

.........I'll second that. Not to mention medical reasons for obesity and
being a couch potato like thyoid problems could easily be overlooked.


More like the owners need to be medicated to keep their hands with food away
from the dogs. Can't tell you how many people get SO offended when they are
told their dogs are obese. This drug worries me.


  #7  
Old January 8th 07, 05:49 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health,rec.pets.dogs.behavior
Melinda Shore
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,732
Default FDA Approves 1st Anti-Obesity Drug for Dogs

In article ,
Sharon Too wrote:
More like the owners need to be medicated to keep their hands with food away
from the dogs. Can't tell you how many people get SO offended when they are
told their dogs are obese. This drug worries me.


I'm ambivalent. Too many dogs are *way* too fat and the
reality is that if people aren't going to change their
habits to improve their own health it's not that likely that
they'll change their habits for their dogs. Mind you, I
think it's more important to be fit than to be thin so at
some level this drug is addressing the lesser problem. But
still, it is a problem and entirely too many people are lazy
and slovenly and we have to deal with the world as it is.
--
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis -

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
  #8  
Old January 8th 07, 05:59 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health,rec.pets.dogs.behavior
buglady
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 863
Default FDA Approves 1st Anti-Obesity Drug for Dogs


"Melinda Shore" wrote in message
...
In article ,

But
still, it is a problem and entirely too many people are lazy
and slovenly and we have to deal with the world as it is.


...........and the answer is medication? Boy, that's an American response to
a problem alright - here take this pill and everything will be fine.

buglady
take out the dog before replying


  #9  
Old January 8th 07, 06:12 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health,rec.pets.dogs.behavior
Melinda Shore
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,732
Default FDA Approves 1st Anti-Obesity Drug for Dogs

In article .net,
buglady wrote:
..........and the answer is medication?


It's better than letting the dog stay fat and doing
nothing. As I said, I don't think that people who are
unwilling to change their behavior to save their own health
and improve their own lives are likely to change their
behavior because their dog is overweight. And again, as I
said I think it's more important to be fit than to be thin,
so this drug is addressing what I think is the lesser
problem. But again, the drug is likely better than allowing
your dog to stay fat and do nothing.

Was the post you're responding to insufficiently clearly
written or something?
--
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis -

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
 




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