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Dental Hygiene



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 10th 07, 04:40 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
Puddin' Man
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 34
Default Dental Hygiene


Greetings,

I've gotten reasonably good at brushing my Lady Brittany's teeth
in recent years.

Now paying about $5 for 3 oz. of Denta-Clean pet toothpaste from
Petsmart. I mix it with baking soda (as I do for my own Tpaste)
before using.

"Human" Tpaste is lots cheaper. Vet sez to use pet toothpaste
as it has more abrasives. All things considered, is this
good advice?

Lady Brittany will be 10 years-old in March. How does vet
teeth-cleaning work for geriatric dawgs? If they're healthy,
vet charges lots more anyway?

I am in the midwest.

TIA,
Puddin'

"A truly good birddawg, even if you never, ever hunt her,
is a Precious, Precious Thing! Mayhap ruin ya for
homo sapiens ..."
  #2  
Old January 10th 07, 04:56 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
Kathleen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 157
Default Dental Hygiene

Puddin' Man wrote:

Greetings,

I've gotten reasonably good at brushing my Lady Brittany's teeth
in recent years.

Now paying about $5 for 3 oz. of Denta-Clean pet toothpaste from
Petsmart. I mix it with baking soda (as I do for my own Tpaste)
before using.

"Human" Tpaste is lots cheaper. Vet sez to use pet toothpaste
as it has more abrasives. All things considered, is this
good advice?

Lady Brittany will be 10 years-old in March. How does vet
teeth-cleaning work for geriatric dawgs? If they're healthy,
vet charges lots more anyway?

I am in the midwest.


I'm not sure your dog will appreciate the minty-fresh taste of most
human tooth pastes. There are mild fruity or bubblegum-flavored pastes
for children but there are always warnings about not swallowing the
stuff and I've never seen a dog yet who would swish and spit.

I'm wondering if a suitable brush wouldn't do a pretty decent job all on
its own, without toothpaste.

Kathleen

  #3  
Old January 10th 07, 06:00 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
Sharon too
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default Dental Hygiene

I've gotten reasonably good at brushing my Lady Brittany's teeth
in recent years.


YAY!

Now paying about $5 for 3 oz. of Denta-Clean pet toothpaste from
Petsmart. I mix it with baking soda (as I do for my own Tpaste)
before using.

"Human" Tpaste is lots cheaper. Vet sez to use pet toothpaste
as it has more abrasives. All things considered, is this
good advice?


Actually, pet toothpaste has *less* abrasives and uses enzymes to break down
the plaque. It also has less foaming agents which is more conducive
tobrushing dogs teeth.

Lady Brittany will be 10 years-old in March. How does vet
teeth-cleaning work for geriatric dawgs? If they're healthy,
vet charges lots more anyway?


Pet teeth cleaning requires the pet to be under general anesthesia. As with
any procedure under anesthesia, preanesthetic blood work needs to be done to
assess the condition of the kidneys and overall health of the dog before
induction. Lots of geriatric dogs get their teeth cleaned and do well, but
it's an individual call.

We don't charge more just because they're old. Being old, though, may
require additional services such as extraction which will cost more. But in
any event, if your dog's teeth need a professional scaling at the vet's,
it's worth talking to him/her about and research. February is Pet Dental
Health Month and some practices give discounts for cleanings all month. We
do.

I am in the midwest.


I'm not. ;-)



  #4  
Old January 10th 07, 06:14 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
Puddin' Man
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 34
Default Dental Hygiene

On Wed, 10 Jan 2007 10:56:19 -0600, Kathleen wrote:

Puddin' Man wrote:

Greetings,

I've gotten reasonably good at brushing my Lady Brittany's teeth
in recent years.

Now paying about $5 for 3 oz. of Denta-Clean pet toothpaste from
Petsmart. I mix it with baking soda (as I do for my own Tpaste)
before using.

"Human" Tpaste is lots cheaper. Vet sez to use pet toothpaste
as it has more abrasives. All things considered, is this
good advice?

Lady Brittany will be 10 years-old in March. How does vet
teeth-cleaning work for geriatric dawgs? If they're healthy,
vet charges lots more anyway?

I am in the midwest.


I'm not sure your dog will appreciate the minty-fresh taste of most
human tooth pastes.


The only DentaClean I've found at La Petsmart in the last year
is "Mint Gel". Doesn't seem to bother her much.

There are mild fruity or bubblegum-flavored pastes
for children but there are always warnings about not swallowing the
stuff and I've never seen a dog yet who would swish and spit.


The warnings are perhaps so's the dumb kid won't swallow
the whole tube, onaccounta it tastes so good (when it'll
surely make the kid sick)? Hard to imagine swallowing
a little dab (human or dawg) doing any real harm ...

I'm wondering if a suitable brush wouldn't do a pretty decent job all on
its own, without toothpaste.


I tried this for a full year in 2005. The vet said (and I concur) that
it didn't do a sufficient job.

Cheers,
P

"A truly good birddawg, even if you never, ever hunt her,
is a Precious, Precious Thing! Mayhap ruin ya for
homo sapiens ..."
  #5  
Old January 10th 07, 06:25 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
shelly
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,155
Default Dental Hygiene

Puddin' Man wrote:

The warnings are perhaps so's the dumb kid won't swallow
the whole tube, onaccounta it tastes so good (when it'll
surely make the kid sick)?


I dunno. I think "dumb" would be expecting kids to have knowledge
beyond their years or experience.

Hard to imagine swallowing a little dab (human or dawg) doing any
real harm ...


Swallowing even a small amount of toothpaste makes me sick.
Fluoride can cause all sorts of gastro-intestinal problems. Does
not knowing that make you "dumb"? Just curious!

--
Shelly (Warning: see label for details)
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
  #6  
Old January 10th 07, 06:32 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
Puddin' Man
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 34
Default Dental Hygiene

On Wed, 10 Jan 2007 13:00:24 -0500, "Sharon too" wrote:

I've gotten reasonably good at brushing my Lady Brittany's teeth
in recent years.


YAY!


She's so good-natured, wasn't that difficult. I shoulda been
doing it years and years ago ...

Now paying about $5 for 3 oz. of Denta-Clean pet toothpaste from
Petsmart. I mix it with baking soda (as I do for my own Tpaste)
before using.

"Human" Tpaste is lots cheaper. Vet sez to use pet toothpaste
as it has more abrasives. All things considered, is this
good advice?


Actually, pet toothpaste has *less* abrasives and uses enzymes to break down
the plaque. It also has less foaming agents which is more conducive
tobrushing dogs teeth.


So your take on the issue is to stay with pet Tpaste ...

Lady Brittany will be 10 years-old in March. How does vet
teeth-cleaning work for geriatric dawgs? If they're healthy,
vet charges lots more anyway?


Pet teeth cleaning requires the pet to be under general anesthesia. As with
any procedure under anesthesia, preanesthetic blood work needs to be done to
assess the condition of the kidneys


Kidneys?

and overall health of the dog before
induction. Lots of geriatric dogs get their teeth cleaned and do well, but
it's an individual call.


As would be expected.

We don't charge more just because they're old. Being old, though, may
require additional services such as extraction which will cost more.


As would be expected.

But in
any event, if your dog's teeth need a professional scaling at the vet's,
it's worth talking to him/her about and research. February is Pet Dental
Health Month and some practices give discounts for cleanings all month. We
do.


Interesting. She's not too bad now, and the vet said she was OK last
July. But her next annual checkup (7-07) will be 2 yrs w/o a teeth
cleaning (lots longer than I would go).

Can you help with details of the preanesthetic blood work?
What anesthetic is commonly used?

I have worked about 6 weeks in as many years ...

Thanks,
Puddin'

"A truly good birddawg, even if you never, ever hunt her,
is a Precious, Precious Thing! Mayhap ruin ya for
homo sapiens ..."
  #7  
Old January 10th 07, 06:43 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
Tara
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,408
Default Dental Hygiene

shelly wrote in news:50kpc5F1fqvfqU1
@mid.individual.net:

Puddin' Man wrote:

The warnings are perhaps so's the dumb kid won't swallow
the whole tube, onaccounta it tastes so good (when it'll
surely make the kid sick)?


I dunno. I think "dumb" would be expecting kids to have knowledge
beyond their years or experience.


I always assumed the warnings were for the adults to read, and disseminate
to the kids (since the users of most starter toothpastes aren't at a
reading level high enough to understand the label in the first place).

Tara
  #8  
Old January 10th 07, 07:16 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.health
Sharon too
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default Dental Hygiene

So your take on the issue is to stay with pet Tpaste ...

Yes.

Pet teeth cleaning requires the pet to be under general anesthesia. As
with
any procedure under anesthesia, preanesthetic blood work needs to be done
to
assess the condition of the kidneys


Kidneys?


Kidneys filter the anesthesia. They are also prone to disease or "old age"
issues with older dogs. Never hurts to find out their health with a simple
blood test before asking them to work a little over time.

Interesting. She's not too bad now, and the vet said she was OK last
July. But her next annual checkup (7-07) will be 2 yrs w/o a teeth
cleaning (lots longer than I would go).


Like humans, some dental health is genetic. And in dogs may even be breed
specific. Our own dog with daily brushings has to have dentals yearly. Other
dogs do well every 2 years or so. Smaller breeds can have nasty teeth. Every
one, and every dog, is different.

Can you help with details of the preanesthetic blood work?


Varies with each practice. We offer three types, each level testing more
values and costinga bit more. Give our vets office a call and ask what they
offer for preanesthetic blood tests, what they cover and how much they cost.
Some practices don't make this optional and it's wrapped up into the cost of
the procedure.

What anesthetic is commonly used?


General anesthesia - gas, patient intubated. Like human surgery. We own a
practice, but I'm not the vet, just fyi. Here's a link:

http://www.healthypet.com/library_vi...x?ID=142&sid=1

AAHA Dental Care Guidelines

Would you let years go by between visits to the dentist?
Probably not! Your pet's dental health is just as important to his or her
overall health as your dental health is to your general health. To help
veterinarians and their teams provide excellent dental care for dogs and
cats and educate pet owners about the importance of proper dental care
throughout their pets' lives, the American Animal Hospital Association
(AAHA) has developed the AAHA Dental Care Guidelines for Dogs and Cats.
Major highlights of these guidelines are covered in this article.

Why Dental Care?
Dental care of dogs and cats is one of the most commonly
overlooked areas of pet health care. In fact, a recent AAHA study showed
that approximately two-thirds of pet owners do not provide the dental care
that is recommended as essential by veterinarians. What's more, the American
Veterinary Dental Society reports that 80 percent of dogs and 70 percent of
cats show signs of oral disease by age three.

Dental disease doesn't affect just the mouth. It can lead to
more serious health problems including heart, lung and kidney disease, which
makes it all the more important that you provide your pets with proper
dental care from the start.

AAHA's Dental Care Guidelines for Dogs and Cats were designed to
provide veterinarians and their teams with a working framework for small
animal dentistry practice, including dental examinations and cleaning and
surgical procedures. Your pet's dental health isn't just in the hands of
your veterinarian though. Pet owner education regarding treatment options
for optimum dental health and the importance of home care are emphasized
throughout the guidelines.

Periodontal Disease
Fido's dog breath and Tabby's tuna breath aren't something to be
ignored - they could be indicative of an oral problem, and the sooner you
have it treated by your veterinarian (and learn to care for it yourself),
the sooner you and your pet can smile proudly.

Periodontal disease is an infection of the tissue surrounding
the teeth that takes hold in progressive stages. It starts out as a
bacterial film called plaque. The bacteria attach to the teeth. When the
bacteria die they can be calcified by calcium in saliva. This forms a hard,
rough substance called tartar or calculus which allows more plaque to
accumulate. Initially, plaque is soft and brushing or chewing hard food and
toys can dislodge it. If left to spread, plaque can lead to gingivitis, an
inflammation of the gums, causing them to become red and swollen and to
bleed easily.

As plaque and calculus develop below the gum line, professional
cleaning will be needed to help manage it. If the plaque and tartar buildup
continues unchecked, infection can form around the root of the tooth.

In the final stages of periodontal disease, the tissues
surrounding the tooth are destroyed, the bony socket holding the tooth in
erodes and the tooth becomes loose. This is a very painful process for your
four-legged friend, but these problems can be averted before they even
start.

Dental Care at the Veterinary Practice
There are two critical components of your pet's veterinary
dental ca oral examinations and dental cleanings. Veterinary dental care
begins at the puppy and kitten life stage. AAHA recommends that
veterinarians evaluate puppies and kittens for problems related to the
deciduous (baby) teeth, missing or extra teeth, swellings and oral
development. As your pet ages, your veterinarian will look for developmental
anomalies, the accumulation of plaque and tartar, periodontal disease and
oral tumors.

Veterinarians can perform a basic oral examination on patients
that are awake. However, a short-lasting anesthetic is required in order to
provide a complete and thorough examination as well as dental cleanings.

The AAHA Dental Care Guidelines recommend regular oral
examinations and dental cleanings, under general anesthesia, for all adult
dogs and cats. AAHA recommends these procedures at least annually starting
at one year of age for cats and small-breed dogs, and at two years of age
for large-breed dogs.

The guidelines further recommend the following:

Pre-anesthetic exam - Whenever anesthesia is needed, special
considerations are taken to help ensure the safety of your pet. Your
veterinarian will thoroughly examine your pet to make sure she's healthy
enough to undergo anesthesia. Depending on your pet's age and general
physical condition, your veterinarian may also run blood, urine,
electrocardiograph, and x-ray tests to check for any dangerous heart,
kidney, or other conditions. Though there is some risk associated with any
medical procedure, modern anesthesia is usually safe, even for older pets.

Anesthesia monitoring - During anesthesia, the monitoring and
recording of your pet's vital signs (such as body temperature, heart rate,
and respiration, as well as other important factors) is important. This
helps ensure the safety of your pet while undergoing anesthesia.

Dental radiographs - Radiographs (x-rays) of the teeth are
needed periodically in order to completely evaluate your pet's oral health.
X-rays aid the veterinarian greatly in detecting abnormalities that cannot
be detected under examination alone. In some cases, x-rays can confirm the
need for extraction of teeth that are loose or badly infected.

Scaling & Polishing - Veterinarians are advised to use similar
instruments as human dentists to remove plaque and calculus from your pet's
teeth. To smooth out any scratches in the tooth enamel, polishing with a
special paste is also recommended.

Fluoride/sealants - The application of an anti-plaque
substance, such as a fluoride treatment and/or a barrier sealant is also
advised. This can help strengthen and desensitize teeth as well as decrease
future plaque.

Home Dental Care
Your pet's dental care doesn't rest with your veterinarian
alone. As a pet owner, you play a pivotal role in helping ensure your pet's
dental health through regular teeth brushing. For more information on
getting started, read our teeth brushing article.

Remember... pets can live longer, healthier lives if oral health
care is managed and maintained throughout their lives. In fact, proper
dental care may add as much as five years to your pet's life! Talk to your
veterinarian about developing a dental care plan for your furry friend.





 




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