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New - considering rescue / rehomed dog



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 31st 03, 01:28 AM
Supergoof
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Default New - considering rescue / rehomed dog

Hi there

Firstly, is there a difference between rescue and rehoming/rehousing?

We're trying to get a Newfoundland puppy from a reputable breeder, but if
that's not going to be possible in the next few months we're considering a
rehomed one instead.

We currently have an 11yo speyed female lab cross who is very good-natured
but has been known to be a little jealous of other dogs getting too close to
us when we're sitting down, but she's fine with those she knows like my
brother's dog and her litter-mate, who is my mother's dog.

I'm trying to find out what are the pros and cons of getting a rehomed dog,
particularly a Newfoundland, especially since this would be our first Newfie
(we've done a lot of reading and asking those who have them about the breed,
I guess my main concern is, is a rehomed dog the best choice as the first
one of a particular breed).

I know any behavioural or health problems would very much depend on what
situation the dog has come from. Are there any 'red flags' that we should
really watch out for?

How do you best integrate a second adult dog into a household with an
existing dog?

Any pointers to resources or FAQs would also be appreciated.

thanks
Rachel
(New Zealand)


  #2  
Old October 31st 03, 01:57 AM
not my real hairline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

If at all possible, arrange for your existing dog to meet the potential
newcomer on neutral ground.

A bad idea is to bring the new dog into the house where the old dog is. All
dogs are territorial. Some are a lot more territorial than others.

Don't worry about the rehoming/rescue issue, it is just semantics. If you
can provide a loving home for an otherwise unwanted dog you are doing
something good.

There is a good book "Second Hand Dog" that I recommend you get, it will
answer all of your questions and a lot you didn't think of.

Good luck,
chuck petterson
rescue bus driver

"Supergoof" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Hi there

Firstly, is there a difference between rescue and rehoming/rehousing?

We're trying to get a Newfoundland puppy from a reputable breeder, but if
that's not going to be possible in the next few months we're considering a
rehomed one instead.

We currently have an 11yo speyed female lab cross who is very good-natured
but has been known to be a little jealous of other dogs getting too close

to
us when we're sitting down, but she's fine with those she knows like my
brother's dog and her litter-mate, who is my mother's dog.

I'm trying to find out what are the pros and cons of getting a rehomed

dog,
particularly a Newfoundland, especially since this would be our first

Newfie
(we've done a lot of reading and asking those who have them about the

breed,
I guess my main concern is, is a rehomed dog the best choice as the first
one of a particular breed).

I know any behavioural or health problems would very much depend on what
situation the dog has come from. Are there any 'red flags' that we should
really watch out for?

How do you best integrate a second adult dog into a household with an
existing dog?

Any pointers to resources or FAQs would also be appreciated.

thanks
Rachel
(New Zealand)




  #3  
Old October 31st 03, 01:57 AM
not my real hairline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

If at all possible, arrange for your existing dog to meet the potential
newcomer on neutral ground.

A bad idea is to bring the new dog into the house where the old dog is. All
dogs are territorial. Some are a lot more territorial than others.

Don't worry about the rehoming/rescue issue, it is just semantics. If you
can provide a loving home for an otherwise unwanted dog you are doing
something good.

There is a good book "Second Hand Dog" that I recommend you get, it will
answer all of your questions and a lot you didn't think of.

Good luck,
chuck petterson
rescue bus driver

"Supergoof" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Hi there

Firstly, is there a difference between rescue and rehoming/rehousing?

We're trying to get a Newfoundland puppy from a reputable breeder, but if
that's not going to be possible in the next few months we're considering a
rehomed one instead.

We currently have an 11yo speyed female lab cross who is very good-natured
but has been known to be a little jealous of other dogs getting too close

to
us when we're sitting down, but she's fine with those she knows like my
brother's dog and her litter-mate, who is my mother's dog.

I'm trying to find out what are the pros and cons of getting a rehomed

dog,
particularly a Newfoundland, especially since this would be our first

Newfie
(we've done a lot of reading and asking those who have them about the

breed,
I guess my main concern is, is a rehomed dog the best choice as the first
one of a particular breed).

I know any behavioural or health problems would very much depend on what
situation the dog has come from. Are there any 'red flags' that we should
really watch out for?

How do you best integrate a second adult dog into a household with an
existing dog?

Any pointers to resources or FAQs would also be appreciated.

thanks
Rachel
(New Zealand)




  #4  
Old October 31st 03, 01:57 AM
not my real hairline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

If at all possible, arrange for your existing dog to meet the potential
newcomer on neutral ground.

A bad idea is to bring the new dog into the house where the old dog is. All
dogs are territorial. Some are a lot more territorial than others.

Don't worry about the rehoming/rescue issue, it is just semantics. If you
can provide a loving home for an otherwise unwanted dog you are doing
something good.

There is a good book "Second Hand Dog" that I recommend you get, it will
answer all of your questions and a lot you didn't think of.

Good luck,
chuck petterson
rescue bus driver

"Supergoof" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Hi there

Firstly, is there a difference between rescue and rehoming/rehousing?

We're trying to get a Newfoundland puppy from a reputable breeder, but if
that's not going to be possible in the next few months we're considering a
rehomed one instead.

We currently have an 11yo speyed female lab cross who is very good-natured
but has been known to be a little jealous of other dogs getting too close

to
us when we're sitting down, but she's fine with those she knows like my
brother's dog and her litter-mate, who is my mother's dog.

I'm trying to find out what are the pros and cons of getting a rehomed

dog,
particularly a Newfoundland, especially since this would be our first

Newfie
(we've done a lot of reading and asking those who have them about the

breed,
I guess my main concern is, is a rehomed dog the best choice as the first
one of a particular breed).

I know any behavioural or health problems would very much depend on what
situation the dog has come from. Are there any 'red flags' that we should
really watch out for?

How do you best integrate a second adult dog into a household with an
existing dog?

Any pointers to resources or FAQs would also be appreciated.

thanks
Rachel
(New Zealand)




  #5  
Old October 31st 03, 03:28 AM
Suja
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


not my real hairline wrote:

Good advice, Chuck. Just going to elaborate on a few things.

If at all possible, arrange for your existing dog to meet the potential
newcomer on neutral ground.


Absolutely. If possible, it would be some place pleasant where there
are enough distractions that they won't focus entirely on each other.
I'm thinking some place like a park with a nice hiking trail. Also make
sure to keep the leashes loose and your body language as relaxed and
positive as you can.

A bad idea is to bring the new dog into the house where the old dog is. All
dogs are territorial. Some are a lot more territorial than others.


My own dog is VERY status conscious. Yet he is highly tolerant of other
dogs on his premises, and I can actually introduce him to a vast
majority of the dogs (large, unneutered males being the exception) by
bringing them into our home. He's just happy to have doggie company and
if there are going to be heirarchy related issues, they don't pop until
later.

There is a good book "Second Hand Dog" that I recommend you get, it will
answer all of your questions and a lot you didn't think of.


Yup. Other books I found on Amazon (but have not read personally) that
might be useful:

Adopt the Perfect Dog: A Practical Guide to Choosing and Training an
Adult Dog
by Gwen Bailey

The Adoption Option: Choosing and Raising the Shelter Dog for You
by Eliza Rubenstein, Shari Kalina

Second Start: Creative Rehoming for Dogs
by Jacqueline F. O'Neil

Save That Dog: Everything You Need to Know About Adopting a Purebred
Rescue Dog
by Liz Palika

Good luck,
Suja

  #6  
Old October 31st 03, 03:28 AM
Suja
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


not my real hairline wrote:

Good advice, Chuck. Just going to elaborate on a few things.

If at all possible, arrange for your existing dog to meet the potential
newcomer on neutral ground.


Absolutely. If possible, it would be some place pleasant where there
are enough distractions that they won't focus entirely on each other.
I'm thinking some place like a park with a nice hiking trail. Also make
sure to keep the leashes loose and your body language as relaxed and
positive as you can.

A bad idea is to bring the new dog into the house where the old dog is. All
dogs are territorial. Some are a lot more territorial than others.


My own dog is VERY status conscious. Yet he is highly tolerant of other
dogs on his premises, and I can actually introduce him to a vast
majority of the dogs (large, unneutered males being the exception) by
bringing them into our home. He's just happy to have doggie company and
if there are going to be heirarchy related issues, they don't pop until
later.

There is a good book "Second Hand Dog" that I recommend you get, it will
answer all of your questions and a lot you didn't think of.


Yup. Other books I found on Amazon (but have not read personally) that
might be useful:

Adopt the Perfect Dog: A Practical Guide to Choosing and Training an
Adult Dog
by Gwen Bailey

The Adoption Option: Choosing and Raising the Shelter Dog for You
by Eliza Rubenstein, Shari Kalina

Second Start: Creative Rehoming for Dogs
by Jacqueline F. O'Neil

Save That Dog: Everything You Need to Know About Adopting a Purebred
Rescue Dog
by Liz Palika

Good luck,
Suja

  #7  
Old October 31st 03, 03:28 AM
Suja
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


not my real hairline wrote:

Good advice, Chuck. Just going to elaborate on a few things.

If at all possible, arrange for your existing dog to meet the potential
newcomer on neutral ground.


Absolutely. If possible, it would be some place pleasant where there
are enough distractions that they won't focus entirely on each other.
I'm thinking some place like a park with a nice hiking trail. Also make
sure to keep the leashes loose and your body language as relaxed and
positive as you can.

A bad idea is to bring the new dog into the house where the old dog is. All
dogs are territorial. Some are a lot more territorial than others.


My own dog is VERY status conscious. Yet he is highly tolerant of other
dogs on his premises, and I can actually introduce him to a vast
majority of the dogs (large, unneutered males being the exception) by
bringing them into our home. He's just happy to have doggie company and
if there are going to be heirarchy related issues, they don't pop until
later.

There is a good book "Second Hand Dog" that I recommend you get, it will
answer all of your questions and a lot you didn't think of.


Yup. Other books I found on Amazon (but have not read personally) that
might be useful:

Adopt the Perfect Dog: A Practical Guide to Choosing and Training an
Adult Dog
by Gwen Bailey

The Adoption Option: Choosing and Raising the Shelter Dog for You
by Eliza Rubenstein, Shari Kalina

Second Start: Creative Rehoming for Dogs
by Jacqueline F. O'Neil

Save That Dog: Everything You Need to Know About Adopting a Purebred
Rescue Dog
by Liz Palika

Good luck,
Suja

  #8  
Old October 31st 03, 05:52 AM
Tee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Supergoof" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Hi there

Firstly, is there a difference between rescue and rehoming/rehousing?


Yes and no. A rescue dog is generally one who was taken from a shelter
where it would have been euthanized. It enters a rescue organization and is
subsequently rehomed. Many rescues also take in owner surrenders where the
dog isn't being rescued at all, just rehomed, but if it comes from a rescue
org then its typically called a rescue dog. Breeders rehome dogs as do
current pet owners. If knowing some history is important to you then I'd
suggest contacting Newf rescues and breeders. Find out which rescues accept
owner surrenders where they can get some background info on the dog.
Breeders often help their puppy buyers rehome dogs when something doesn't
work out. They also tend to rehome dogs who were kept for showing and
washed out or when the dog's career is over.

--
Tara


  #9  
Old October 31st 03, 05:52 AM
Tee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Supergoof" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Hi there

Firstly, is there a difference between rescue and rehoming/rehousing?


Yes and no. A rescue dog is generally one who was taken from a shelter
where it would have been euthanized. It enters a rescue organization and is
subsequently rehomed. Many rescues also take in owner surrenders where the
dog isn't being rescued at all, just rehomed, but if it comes from a rescue
org then its typically called a rescue dog. Breeders rehome dogs as do
current pet owners. If knowing some history is important to you then I'd
suggest contacting Newf rescues and breeders. Find out which rescues accept
owner surrenders where they can get some background info on the dog.
Breeders often help their puppy buyers rehome dogs when something doesn't
work out. They also tend to rehome dogs who were kept for showing and
washed out or when the dog's career is over.

--
Tara


  #10  
Old October 31st 03, 05:52 AM
Tee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Supergoof" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Hi there

Firstly, is there a difference between rescue and rehoming/rehousing?


Yes and no. A rescue dog is generally one who was taken from a shelter
where it would have been euthanized. It enters a rescue organization and is
subsequently rehomed. Many rescues also take in owner surrenders where the
dog isn't being rescued at all, just rehomed, but if it comes from a rescue
org then its typically called a rescue dog. Breeders rehome dogs as do
current pet owners. If knowing some history is important to you then I'd
suggest contacting Newf rescues and breeders. Find out which rescues accept
owner surrenders where they can get some background info on the dog.
Breeders often help their puppy buyers rehome dogs when something doesn't
work out. They also tend to rehome dogs who were kept for showing and
washed out or when the dog's career is over.

--
Tara


 




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