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Rescuing dogs as a hobby



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 2nd 07, 04:56 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Rescuing dogs as a hobby

After a couple of positive experiences rescuing dogs, I am wondering
if anyone out there does this for a kind of hobby. Getting a dog from
a private party or dog pound, spending a month or two training it, and
getting its medical needs met. Then placing it in a good home for no
charge or little charge.

It seems like it would be easier to place a dog with a new owner if
you could verify that it was trained, kennel trained, house trained,
aggression tested, shots up to date etc. It would take a lot of the
risk out for the new owner.

I realize this isn't a profitable endeavor but I am thinking it would
be rewarding in other ways. Is anyone doing this ?

  #2  
Old August 2nd 07, 05:43 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
Judy
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Posts: 1,411
Default Rescuing dogs as a hobby

wrote in message
oups.com...
It seems like it would be easier to place a dog with a new owner if
you could verify that it was trained, kennel trained, house trained,
aggression tested, shots up to date etc. It would take a lot of the
risk out for the new owner.

I realize this isn't a profitable endeavor but I am thinking it would
be rewarding in other ways. Is anyone doing this ?


Every single one of the good rescue groups already in place around the
country.

Why not contact one of them - perhaps one dealing with a breed that you feel
a particular affinity toward - and volunteer?

Judy

  #3  
Old August 2nd 07, 10:28 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
Charles Richmond[_2_]
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Posts: 4
Default Rescuing dogs as a hobby

Judy wrote:
wrote in message
oups.com...
It seems like it would be easier to place a dog with a new owner if
you could verify that it was trained, kennel trained, house trained,
aggression tested, shots up to date etc. It would take a lot of the
risk out for the new owner.

I realize this isn't a profitable endeavor but I am thinking it would
be rewarding in other ways. Is anyone doing this ?


Every single one of the good rescue groups already in place around the
country.

Why not contact one of them - perhaps one dealing with a breed that you
feel a particular affinity toward - and volunteer?


And dog rescue tends to be more of an obsession than a hobby.


--
+----------------------------------------------------------------+
| Charles and Francis Richmond richmond at plano dot net |
+----------------------------------------------------------------+
  #4  
Old August 3rd 07, 06:56 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
persian ram
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Rescuing dogs as a hobby


wrote in message
oups.com...
After a couple of positive experiences rescuing dogs, I am wondering
if anyone out there does this for a kind of hobby. Getting a dog from
a private party or dog pound, spending a month or two training it, and
getting its medical needs met. Then placing it in a good home for no
charge or little charge.

It seems like it would be easier to place a dog with a new owner if
you could verify that it was trained, kennel trained, house trained,
aggression tested, shots up to date etc. It would take a lot of the
risk out for the new owner.

I realize this isn't a profitable endeavor but I am thinking it would
be rewarding in other ways. Is anyone doing this ?


Mark,

I am not sure of your context "hobby." If you mean it is an endeavor that
is not likely to yiled a profit, then "hobby" is accurate. If you mean an
endeavor where the rewards outweigh the aggravations, eh!?! It's a toss up.
If you mean something that can be done on a casual basis, something you can
walk away from whenever you choose, then the answer is no.

"Rescue" must be approached with some degree of commitment, purpose, sense
of business. There are inherent risks involved with surrendering families,
the dogs themselves, adopting families. All of this has to be considered
before taking on the commitment of time and expense involved with a
particular dog. Since you would not be affiliated with anyone else this
means you have to pay for all of the vet expenses, transportation, etc.
Feeding a dog is the absolute least expense you will incur. How will you
recoup any of the expense involved? What will you do with a dog that has a
serious illness? Are you ready to spend six or nine months caring for a dog
with heart worms?

Unfortunately, there are millions of dogs that could use a good home. I am
assuming from your post you are not "part of the fancy" so you are not
involved with a specific breed. That isn't bad (or good) but it lowers the
chances of getting into a strong experience from the start.

If you have no interest in breed specific rescue I suggest you start out by
volunteering at the local shelter. If you have friends or acquaintances
associated with a breed, you could volunteer to foster dogs for a group and
let the "rescue" people work on medical and adoption challenges. In place
rescue organizations are always in need of additional foster homes and
transportation assistance.

Your heart is in the right place. I offer these views based on 19 year
experience with rescue dogs (two elderly ones napping at my feet as I write
this) and not to discourage your involvement. One always feels good when a
dog gets a new, good home. That is the only payoff.

chuck petterson
rescue bus driver


  #5  
Old August 4th 07, 03:50 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
Paul E. Schoen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,654
Default Rescuing dogs as a hobby


"Charles Richmond" wrote in message
...
Judy wrote:
wrote in message
oups.com...
It seems like it would be easier to place a dog with a new owner if
you could verify that it was trained, kennel trained, house trained,
aggression tested, shots up to date etc. It would take a lot of the
risk out for the new owner.

I realize this isn't a profitable endeavor but I am thinking it would
be rewarding in other ways. Is anyone doing this ?


Every single one of the good rescue groups already in place around the
country.

Why not contact one of them - perhaps one dealing with a breed that you
feel a particular affinity toward - and volunteer?


And dog rescue tends to be more of an obsession than a hobby.


Dog rescue is a lot of work, and can prove frustrating. I have gotten
involved in dog rescue through a friend, and I ended up keeping one
(Muttley) of the four dogs she had found on the streets in February of
2006. Then, in June, she got me involved in rescuing another dog, Lucky,
and that is a continuing story. So far our efforts have probably cost us
each well over $1000, not counting the normal expenses I have incurred just
for Muttley's upkeep since I adopted him.

Yet, it has been a wonderful experience, and I have learned a lot. Most of
my adventures are recorded for posterity in Usenet, and there is more of
the story and pictures on my website. I wish you luck, and I'm sure you
will make many canine and human friends.

Paul, Muttley and Lucky
www.peschoen.com


  #6  
Old August 7th 07, 10:07 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
Charles Richmond[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Rescuing dogs as a hobby

persian ram wrote:

[snip...] [snip...] [snip...]

I am not sure of your context "hobby." If you mean it is an endeavor that
is not likely to yiled a profit, then "hobby" is accurate. If you mean an
endeavor where the rewards outweigh the aggravations, eh!?! It's a toss up.
If you mean something that can be done on a casual basis, something you can
walk away from whenever you choose, then the answer is no.

"Rescue" must be approached with some degree of commitment, purpose, sense
of business. There are inherent risks involved with surrendering families,
the dogs themselves, adopting families. All of this has to be considered
before taking on the commitment of time and expense involved with a
particular dog. Since you would not be affiliated with anyone else this
means you have to pay for all of the vet expenses, transportation, etc.
Feeding a dog is the absolute least expense you will incur. How will you
recoup any of the expense involved? What will you do with a dog that has a
serious illness? Are you ready to spend six or nine months caring for a dog
with heart worms?

Unfortunately, there are millions of dogs that could use a good home. I am
assuming from your post you are not "part of the fancy" so you are not
involved with a specific breed. That isn't bad (or good) but it lowers the
chances of getting into a strong experience from the start.

If you have no interest in breed specific rescue I suggest you start out by
volunteering at the local shelter. If you have friends or acquaintances
associated with a breed, you could volunteer to foster dogs for a group and
let the "rescue" people work on medical and adoption challenges. In place
rescue organizations are always in need of additional foster homes and
transportation assistance.

Your heart is in the right place. I offer these views based on 19 year
experience with rescue dogs (two elderly ones napping at my feet as I write
this) and not to discourage your involvement. One always feels good when a
dog gets a new, good home. That is the only payoff.


I think this is a fine description of what dog rescue is about.
I heartily agree with everything you said here, except the last:

The *big* payoff may be when a dog gets a new, good home. But
as someone who has fostered rescue dogs, there is a great deal
of satisfaction in seeing the rescue dogs lose some of their
"baggage", gain a respectable weight, become socialized better,
and generally blossom in a home-style environment. I love every
one of the dogs that my wife and I fostered. All of them are
wonderful!!!

--
+----------------------------------------------------------------+
| Charles and Francis Richmond richmond at plano dot net |
+----------------------------------------------------------------+
  #7  
Old August 24th 07, 12:51 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
Global Warming
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Rescuing dogs as a hobby

After a couple of positive experiences rescuing dogs, I am wondering
if anyone out there does this for a kind of hobby. Getting a dog from
a private party or dog pound, spending a month or two training it, and
getting its medical needs met. Then placing it in a good home for no
charge or little charge.

It seems like it would be easier to place a dog with a new owner if
you could verify that it was trained, kennel trained, house trained,
aggression tested, shots up to date etc. It would take a lot of the
risk out for the new owner.

I realize this isn't a profitable endeavor but I am thinking it would
be rewarding in other ways. Is anyone doing this ?



You bet
 




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