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wee terrier training



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 1st 04, 10:42 AM
Tommy Glassford
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Default wee terrier training

Puddles is a white west highland terrier and he's 20 weeks, he's 10 pounds
in weight. He's coming on brilliant with his toilet training but he's still
doing a lot of biting, but he's getting there with our 7 year old daughter.
It's basic stuff like when to cut down on the meals. We'd like to stop his
1200 feed, but he doesn't really take much of his 0800; how do I go about
him taking more at 0800 and less at 1200 and slowly reducing and stopping
the 1200 with the next feeds at 1600 and 2000.

For his weight and age, is this okay? How much water should he be getting on
a daily basis?

When out he's doing a lot of tugging on the lead, how do I reduce and then
stop this? More importantly is that he continually insists on eating
whatever he comes across and this can be dangerous for him and for me/us
trying to take whatever off of him. How do we go about this?

Incidently, when peeing, he squats. When will he lift his leg so that I know
for certain he's doing something, the way he looks at me when he's squatting
I'd sware he's just taking the mike.






  #2  
Old March 1st 04, 07:29 PM
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On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 10:42:50 -0000 Tommy Glassford whittled these words:
When out he's doing a lot of tugging on the lead, how do I reduce and then
stop this?


Use a longer lead. Carry most of it coiled up in your hand. When he
starts to tug step toward him so that there is no tension and nothing to
tug against. If you continue to feel tension drop a couple of loops of
lead so that again there is nothing to tug against. If he still
continues both drop some more of the lead and pat your leg and change
directions. Your lead should be a safety device, not a restraint. Work
on getting him to want to be with you by making yourself fun and happy.
Try to pretend there is no lead and that you have to simply persuade him
to be with you. Toys are often a help in this, you won't have to use
them forever, just long enough for him to see you as a source of fun.
Also at his age you will have more long term success if you spend more
time simply following him than trying to get him to do it your way. Let
him do quite a bit of exploring, changing directions on his own, looking
at stuff. The more he is allowed to satisfy his curiousity when he wants
to the more willing he will be to go your way when you haven't the time
for that.

More importantly is that he continually insists on eating
whatever he comes across and this can be dangerous for him and for me/us
trying to take whatever off of him. How do we go about this?


Teach him "leave it" There is a video that does an excellent job of
showing exactly how to do that. "Sirius Puppy Training" by Ian Dunbar.

Also you really should look for a puppy class to help you learn how to
teach your dog.

Incidently, when peeing, he squats. When will he lift his leg so that I know
for certain he's doing something, the way he looks at me when he's squatting
I'd sware he's just taking the mike.


It could be soon or it could be never. Most male dogs are sometimes leg
lifters, squatting when the mood suits them. It is not at all unusual
for a male to not lift at all until well over a year old. Sharpening
your observation skills so you can tell what he is doing even if he is
squatting will really help in learning more about the dog overall. Start
paying attention to the whole dog - what the ears are doing, what the
head is doing, what the tail is doing. There is a lot of communication
going on there and it really helps to learn how to read doggie language.

--
Diane Blackman
http://dog-play.com/
http://dog-play.com/shop2.html


  #3  
Old March 1st 04, 09:18 PM
Jo Wolf
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I second Dianne's suggestion about a puppy kindergarden class. They
address just the issues you mention... and usually offer multiple
solutions, so you have a tool box to work with, not just one hammer.

I'm a long time terrier owner, and even thouogh I teach obedience for
older pups and dogs, my pups go to this type of class. It's great for
socialization, too. AND FUN!

Jo Wolf
Martinez, Georgia

 




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