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boyfriend for pikapoo



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 29th 04, 07:19 PM
Butterfly
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Default boyfriend for pikapoo

Should I mate her with only a Pikapoo or can she mate with a different breed
of her size.
Butterfly


  #2  
Old June 29th 04, 08:59 PM
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On Tue, 29 Jun 2004 13:19:47 -0500 Butterfly whittled these words:
Should I mate her with only a Pikapoo or can she mate with a different breed
of her size.


Physically she can mate with any dog, breed doesn't matter. Obviously
the dog should be close to her size. Why do you want to breed her?
Dogs deserve our learning and care before we breed them. We should breed
for best health. To breed for best health you must know a lot about the
dog's family. And to make the best dog in temperament you must know a
lot about the dog's family. What do you know about her parents and
grandparents? She can be wonderful but maybe not so her family. You must
know this before breeding or there may be sadness. And if you mate her
without understanding her family and his family you might not get what
you expect. That might be a sad thing for both the people and the
puppies.

And pregnancy is a big risk. She could die. I'm not sure I'd want a dog
I love taking that risk. These small dogs are not natural animals. We
have made it harder and more dangerous for them to give birth.


--
Diane Blackman
http://dog-play.com/
http://dogplay.com/Shop/
  #3  
Old June 29th 04, 10:43 PM
Butterfly
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Default

My mom neutered her dog before she ever had a litter. The dog has shown a
desire to have babies of her own which is saddening. She has even attempted
kidnapping pups from neighbors.. I want to give Honey the motherhood
experience before having her neutered. I understand the health risks and I
know her pregnancy will have to be monitored and a cesarean will probably be
necessary.
Butterfly
wrote in message ...
On Tue, 29 Jun 2004 13:19:47 -0500 Butterfly
whittled these words:
Should I mate her with only a Pikapoo or can she mate with a different
breed
of her size.


Physically she can mate with any dog, breed doesn't matter. Obviously
the dog should be close to her size. Why do you want to breed her?
Dogs deserve our learning and care before we breed them. We should breed
for best health. To breed for best health you must know a lot about the
dog's family. And to make the best dog in temperament you must know a
lot about the dog's family. What do you know about her parents and
grandparents? She can be wonderful but maybe not so her family. You must
know this before breeding or there may be sadness. And if you mate her
without understanding her family and his family you might not get what
you expect. That might be a sad thing for both the people and the
puppies.

And pregnancy is a big risk. She could die. I'm not sure I'd want a dog
I love taking that risk. These small dogs are not natural animals. We
have made it harder and more dangerous for them to give birth.


--
Diane Blackman
http://dog-play.com/
http://dogplay.com/Shop/



  #4  
Old June 29th 04, 11:02 PM
Melinda Shore
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In article ,
Butterfly wrote:
I want to give Honey the motherhood
experience before having her neutered. I understand the health risks and I
know her pregnancy will have to be monitored and a cesarean will probably be
necessary.


Sounds like a divine experience. I'm sure that Honey will
be ever so appreciative.
--
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis -

Since January 2001 the federal budget outlook for 2002-2011
has deteriorated by $8.8 trillion.
  #5  
Old June 30th 04, 03:04 AM
Just Mel
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I don't mean to sound hostile but, really if you want the "whole experience"
of her having pups, you should. Including going down to the pound and
watching her puppies being put to sleep. even when you think you have "good"
homes, it doesnt work that way. the only time you should EVER consider
having pups is if you wish to improve the breed. and since you dog is a
mixed breed there is no way to improve on it. I recently had my 8 month old
900.00 champion sired, Mom is a dam of merit,, pointed puppy spayed. because
I love her so much I wouldn't want to risk her life.
wrote in message ...
On Tue, 29 Jun 2004 13:19:47 -0500 Butterfly

whittled these words:
Should I mate her with only a Pikapoo or can she mate with a different

breed
of her size.


Physically she can mate with any dog, breed doesn't matter. Obviously
the dog should be close to her size. Why do you want to breed her?
Dogs deserve our learning and care before we breed them. We should breed
for best health. To breed for best health you must know a lot about the
dog's family. And to make the best dog in temperament you must know a
lot about the dog's family. What do you know about her parents and
grandparents? She can be wonderful but maybe not so her family. You must
know this before breeding or there may be sadness. And if you mate her
without understanding her family and his family you might not get what
you expect. That might be a sad thing for both the people and the
puppies.

And pregnancy is a big risk. She could die. I'm not sure I'd want a dog
I love taking that risk. These small dogs are not natural animals. We
have made it harder and more dangerous for them to give birth.


--
Diane Blackman
http://dog-play.com/
http://dogplay.com/Shop/



  #6  
Old June 30th 04, 09:58 AM
White Monkey
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Just Mel" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
I don't mean to sound hostile but, really if you want the "whole

experience"
of her having pups, you should. Including going down to the pound and
watching her puppies being put to sleep. even when you think you have

"good"
homes, it doesnt work that way. the only time you should EVER consider
having pups is if you wish to improve the breed. and since you dog is a
mixed breed there is no way to improve on it. I recently had my 8 month

old
900.00 champion sired, Mom is a dam of merit,, pointed puppy spayed.

because
I love her so much I wouldn't want to risk her life.



Saskia, my 4 month old Dane pup, cost us 950 Euros. Her parents and
grandparents have been champions, her father is currently the Dutch Grand
Champion. We'll be having her spayed right after her first heat--she's a
family dog. We have no wish to put her through the "motherhood experience".
Almost a pity because she is such a fine example of the breed, at least as
she's developing so far, but no. It's too dangerous and even when it goes
well would put her through so much; the breeder will keep working on the
line herself. There are littermates, and the breeder has kept her
half-sister, 2 years old, and her half-brother, six months old. Saskia is a
family member and we love her too much to get into that whole mess with her.
--Katrina


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
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  #7  
Old July 2nd 04, 01:36 AM
diannes
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Default

Butterfly wrote:
My mom neutered her dog before she ever had a litter. The dog has shown a
desire to have babies of her own which is saddening. She has even attempted
kidnapping pups from neighbors..


I also have a very maternal bitch that was spayed before having
a litter. But so what? All she missed was maybe 4 or 5 weeks of
having to stay in a whelping box - after that point the majority
of even the most dedicated moms will do anything to get away
from the little rats. It's not as though my girl is pining about
having "missed" anything, and dogs that *have* had litters aren't
any happier or more satisfied because of it.

What you're doing is projecting your own emotions onto your dog.

I want to give Honey the motherhood experience before having her neutered.
I understand the health risks and I know her pregnancy will have to be
monitored and a cesarean will probably be necessary.


Yikes, I wish I had $2000-$3000 to drop on a project that at best
will result in puppies you are lucky to place into good homes for
free and at worst will result in your girl dying (you *do* realize
that that's a real risk for toy breeds, right?) And then there's
that 1 in 4 chance you'll be giving her for having "the breast
cancer experience"... the 50% chance of "the pyometra experience"
.... the mastitis experience, the previously-mentioned cesarean
experience, the dead puppy experience... not things most people
would wish on their dogs. Knowledgable people *know* that they're
putting their girls at risk of these things by breeding them
and do everything they can to reduce the risks, but sh*t still
does happen.

When a knowledgable breeder makes a decision to do a breeding,
they are always making a choice between the potential benefits
of the breeding (that is, healthy, sound puppies with good homes
waiting for them) outweigh the risks of the pregnancy. But they're
sure as heck not trying to fool themselves that they're doing
it for their bitch's benefit.

Dianne
  #8  
Old July 2nd 04, 12:08 PM
Jade
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Default

I thought that waiting until after the first heat does not reduce the chance
of breast cancer in dogs.
I am just curious as to why you wont get it done at 6mths, before the first
heat?
:0)
Jade & Kelsey - about the same age as Saskia :0)


"White Monkey" wrote in message
...

"Just Mel" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
I don't mean to sound hostile but, really if you want the "whole

experience"
of her having pups, you should. Including going down to the pound and
watching her puppies being put to sleep. even when you think you have

"good"
homes, it doesnt work that way. the only time you should EVER consider
having pups is if you wish to improve the breed. and since you dog is a
mixed breed there is no way to improve on it. I recently had my 8 month

old
900.00 champion sired, Mom is a dam of merit,, pointed puppy spayed.

because
I love her so much I wouldn't want to risk her life.



Saskia, my 4 month old Dane pup, cost us 950 Euros. Her parents and
grandparents have been champions, her father is currently the Dutch Grand
Champion. We'll be having her spayed right after her first heat--she's a
family dog. We have no wish to put her through the "motherhood

experience".
Almost a pity because she is such a fine example of the breed, at least as
she's developing so far, but no. It's too dangerous and even when it goes
well would put her through so much; the breeder will keep working on the
line herself. There are littermates, and the breeder has kept her
half-sister, 2 years old, and her half-brother, six months old. Saskia is

a
family member and we love her too much to get into that whole mess with

her.
--Katrina


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.712 / Virus Database: 468 - Release Date: 6/27/04




  #9  
Old July 2nd 04, 12:42 PM
White Monkey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I thought that waiting until after the first heat does not reduce the
chance
of breast cancer in dogs.
I am just curious as to why you wont get it done at 6mths, before the

first
heat?
:0)
Jade & Kelsey - about the same age as Saskia :0)



Because my vet says that new studies are showing that the incidence of spay
incontinence goes WAY down after the first heat, while breast cancer remains
relatively rare.
--Katrina


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.712 / Virus Database: 468 - Release Date: 6/27/04


  #10  
Old July 2nd 04, 07:29 PM
diannes
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Default

White Monkey wrote:
Because my vet says that new studies are showing that the incidence of spay
incontinence goes WAY down after the first heat, while breast cancer remains
relatively rare.


It'd be interesting to know what studies s/he's basing that on
because I try to keep an eye on the medical literature on these
issues and I haven't seen any such reports. To the contrary,
at least one study has shown a reduced incidence of spay
incontinence in bitches spayed before the first season (1);
another failed to show a significant correlation between age
at spaying and the incidence of incontinence (2). And at least
one study has shown an incidence of breast cancer in female
dogs of over 50% (3) - not rare by any means. (Cites follow.)

JFWIW,

Dianne
------------------------------------------------------------------

(1) J Reprod Fertil Suppl. 2001;57:233-6.

The relationship of urinary incontinence to early spaying
in bitches.

Stocklin-Gautschi NM, Hassig M, Reichler IM, Hubler M,
Arnold S.

Department of Reproduction, Veterinary Faculty of Zurich,
Winterthurerstrasse 260, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland.

It is still controversial whether a bitch should be spayed
before or after the first oestrus. It would be desirable to
spay bitches at an age that would minimize the side effects
of neutering. With regard to the risk of mammary tumours,
early spaying must be recommended because the incidence of
tumours is reduced considerably. The aim of the present
study was to determine whether early spaying also reduces
the risk of urinary incontinence. The owners of 206 bitches
that had been spayed before their first oestrus and for at
least 3 years were questioned on the occurrence of urinary
incontinence as a result of spaying. At the time of the
enquiry the average age of the bitches was 6.5 years, and
the average age at the time of surgery was 7.1 months.
Urinary incontinence after spaying occurred in 9.7% of
bitches. This incidence is approximately half that of
spaying after the first oestrus. Urinary incontinence
affected 12.5% of bitches that were of a large body weight
( 20 kg body weight) and 5.1% of bitches that were of a
small body weight ( 20 kg body weight). The surgical
procedure (ovariectomy versus ovariohysterectomy) had no
influence on the incidence, or on the period between spaying
and the occurrence of urinary incontinence. Urinary
incontinence occurred on average at 2 years and 10 months
after surgery and occurred each day, while the animals were
awake or during sleep. However, compared with late spaying
the clinical signs of urinary incontinence were more
distinct after early spaying.

---------------------------

(2) Small Anim Pract. 1998 Dec;39(12):559-66.

Acquired urinary incontinence in bitches: its incidence and
relationship to neutering practices.

Thrusfield MV, Holt PE, Muirhead RH.

Department of Veterinary Clinical Studies, University of
Edinburgh, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, Easter
Bush Veterinary Centre, Roslin, Midlothian.

A five-year cohort study was conducted on bitches chosen by
a sample of 233 randomly selected practising veterinary
surgeons in the UK, to estimate the incidence of acquired
urinary incontinence (AUI) in neutered and entire animals,
and to investigate possible risk factors associated with
neutering practices. Information was collected using
questionnaires, and data on 809 bitches, of which 22
developed AUI, were obtained. The estimated incidence rates
in neutered and entire animals were 0.0174 and 0.0022 per
animal-year, respectively (95 per cent confidence intervals:
0.0110, 0.0275 and 0.0009, 0.0058, respectively). The
relative risk, neutered vs entire, was 7.8 (95 per cent
confidence interval: 2.6, 31.5). The attributable
proportion(exposed) and population attributable proportion
were 87.1 per cent and 63.1 per cent (95 per cent confidence
intervals: 61.9 per cent, 95.6 per cent, and 28.3 percent,
88.5 per cent, respectively). An increased risk, significant
at the conventional 5 per cent level, was not demonstrated
in animals neutered before, vs after, first heat (relative
risk: 3.9, 95 per cent confidence interval: 0.8, 10.4),
although the result was significant at the 10 per cent
level. Removal of the cervix was not shown to be a risk
factor in neutered dogs.

---------------------------

Reprod Fertil Suppl. 2001;57:439-43.

Population-based incidence of mammary tumours in some dog
breeds.

Moe L.

Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian
School of Veterinary Science, Box 8146 Dep., N-0033 Oslo,
Norway.

Data from two population-based studies in four Norwegian
counties were used to calculate the crude incidence of
mammary tumours, and the age- and breed-specific incidence
of mammary tumours in female dogs of three different breeds.
The largest study comprised 14401 histologically verified
tumour cases from four counties covered by the Norwegian
Canine Cancer Register. The registry covers about 25% of the
total Norwegian dog population. The second study was a
census in Norway that was sent to all owners of the
following breeds: boxers, bichon frise and Bernese mountain
dogs, to estimate the age distribution of the female dog
population at risk of developing mammary tumours. The crude
incidence of malignant mammary tumours in female dogs of any
breed was 53.3%. The highest relative risk ratio of mammary
tumours was found in boxers, cocker spaniels, English
springer spaniels and dachshunds. The mean age of
histologically diagnosed mammary tumours was 7.9 years in
boxers and 7.8 years in springer spaniels, compared with 8.8
years in all other breeds. In the four Norwegian counties
from 1992 to 1997, the population-based incidence rates (for
all ages) of malignant mammary tumours per 1000 female dogs
per year were 35.47 in boxers, 3.87 in Bernese mountain dogs
and 17.69 in bichon frise. Mammary cancer is the most common
tumour in female dogs in Norway, and represents a population
of almost entirely reproductively intact females. The age-
specific incidence rates for mammary cancer vary
considerably among the three breeds that were studied in
detail.

 




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