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Jogging with Dalmation puppy



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 30th 04, 01:10 AM
AllenAzali
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Default Jogging with Dalmation puppy

Hello All,

After some research, I have recently adopted a 2 month old Dalmation
puppy. I was interested because most dog sources described it as a
breed that loved to jog along side its owner. I have also read that
alot of people do not recommend jogging with a puppy too young in its
life, as its bones are still in development. I was wondering if
anybody knows how or when is a great time to start her up on this type
of training. I would like to eventually get her up to 3-5 miles every
or every other day. Hopefully without a leash.
  #2  
Old August 30th 04, 04:33 AM
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In rec.pets.dogs.activities AllenAzali wrote:
Hello All,


After some research, I have recently adopted a 2 month old Dalmation
puppy.


I am not good at spelling so I use tricks to help. For your breed I
remember that I've seen A dalmatian, but I've never seen O dalmation.
IOW all As no Os in the name.

I was interested because most dog sources described it as a
breed that loved to jog along side its owner. I have also read that
alot of people do not recommend jogging with a puppy too young in its
life, as its bones are still in development.


That is correct. The bone ends on a young mammal are somewhat soft to
facilitate growth. As the animal matures those growth plates "close" or
harden. The primary cause of damage to those growth plates in concussive
forces, pounding on the joints. In dogs the most common source of
concussive forces include jumping and runnning on hard surfaces. Free
running on resilient surfaces (e.g. grass, dirt unless really hard packed)
is generally safe. Free running is where the young dog can stop or rest
without feeling pressure to keep moving.

I was wondering if
anybody knows how or when is a great time to start her up on this type
of training.


It depends upon your running surface. If the running surface is not hard
then you can think about beginning to work up to distance starting at
roughly 7 months. Take it slow at first.

I would like to eventually get her up to 3-5 miles every
or every other day.


Stay away from concrete, asphalt and hard pack for the first 14 months.
Generally speaking the growth plates close around 14 moths. EArlier than
that she might easily run the distances you envision but take care to pay
attention to whether she is tiring. The muscles will do a better job of
supporting the joints, and thus avoiding concussive force if they are not
over tired.

Hopefully without a leash.


That will depend upon where you are running, and your consistency in
training. Coach dogs should naturally stay with you - BUT - very few
Dalmatians are bred with the original temperament in mind. So heritage
aside you may find that your pup is quick to take off after cats and other
such interesting things to chase.

--
Diane Blackman
http://dog-play.com/
http://dogplay.com/Shop/
  #4  
Old August 31st 04, 06:00 AM
Jo Wolf
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What you are seeing now is normal puppy staying with it's source of
security. Adolescence will likely change that, with a bid for more
independence. If you are running on paved surfaces, that tells me that
human and vehicular traffic will be nearby. Use a leash, and train the
pup not to pull on the leash.

I suggest a good obedience class, which can start as early as 16 weeks
of age, but in practical terms, can be between 4 months and 6 months as
the youngest age, depending on local trainer preferences. This is a
great way to get started with any pup, as it sets up the concept and
experience of working as a team, and builds the pup's trust and respect
in you.

You're right that serious running shouldn't start until at least a year
of age. Start with short distances and build up.

Jo Wolf
Martinez, Georgia

  #5  
Old September 1st 04, 01:09 PM
Diana
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"AllenAzali" wrote in message
om...

[..]
"coach dog" in more ways than one!

All these drills were carried out with a regular chocker, and I do
know how much dalmatians don't like them as a form of dicipline. It


A choker? ...as in a choke chain?

The choke chain was introduced back in the early 1900's, when police and
service dogs were being trained with the then more popular pinch collars.
Remember, in those days children were still caned at school and generally
punishments were much more severe.

Conrad Most, a German Colonel was one of the most influential trainers of
his day and wrote the book 'Training Dogs', which became the blueprint for
service dog training for much of the last century. His methods were deemed
kind as he was one of the first trainers to acknowledge that dogs were
incapable of human rationalisation and morality, though still, by today's
standards much of the method outlined is pretty severe. He deemed the choke
chain to be a particularly harsh form of training collar.

Neither the pinch or the choke collar were ever intended for use on dogs
under 6 months old, That's because they work by causing the dog pain when
the dog pulls, the word pain often being substituted for the word
'correction'. The pain that a pinch collar, though uncomfortable, is manly a
skin pulling sensation whereas the choke collar is much harsher on the neck
muscles andwindpipe of the dog. There is a fair amount of information to be
found (if you run a search) on the long term physical damage that a choke
collar can do to both the windpipe and neck vertebrae of the dog, especially
if used with excess force or improperly.

A choke collar should never be used on a 2 month old puppy.

Diana

--
Cindy's web site
http://cindy-incidentally.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk



  #7  
Old September 8th 04, 08:29 PM
[email protected]
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In rec.pets.dogs.activities Chris B wrote:
wrote in message ...

That is correct. The bone ends on a young mammal are somewhat soft to
facilitate growth. As the animal matures those growth plates "close" or
harden. The primary cause of damage to those growth plates in concussive
forces, pounding on the joints. In dogs the most common source of
concussive forces include jumping and runnning on hard surfaces. Free
running on resilient surfaces (e.g. grass, dirt unless really hard packed)
is generally safe. Free running is where the young dog can stop or rest
without feeling pressure to keep moving.


Can you provide some links? I know this is the same reason people say
not to let children lift weights. But, we certainly don't tell
children not to jump and play or run or play sports.


So... I'm just wondering why people think a child running won't damage
the growth plates, but for a dog it will. Not trying to flame you just
asking.


We shouldn't be telling dogs not to jump, run or play sports either. That
is not what my post said. Please look for whatever evidence you want. My
father is an orthopedic surgeon and I've discussed this matter with him
specifically in regard to children as well as dogs. There are different
rules regard manner of pitching in Little League specifically to avoid
the kind of damage I've discussed. There are similarly rules for all kinds
of childrens organized sports to avoid damage to the growth plates. So
search on that.

For example to come up with this article
http://www.drpribut.com/sports/spchild.html

I searched google for
children's sport growth plates

--
Diane Blackman
http://dog-play.com/
http://dogplay.com/Shop/
  #8  
Old September 8th 04, 08:31 PM
Rocky
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Chris B said in rec.pets.dogs.health:

The bone ends on a young mammal are somewhat soft to
facilitate growth. As the animal matures those growth
plates "close" or harden. The primary cause of damage to
those growth plates in concussive forces, pounding on the
joints. In dogs the most common source of concussive
forces include jumping and runnning on hard surfaces. Free
running on resilient surfaces (e.g. grass, dirt unless
really hard packed) is generally safe. Free running is
where the young dog can stop or rest without feeling
pressure to keep moving.


Can you provide some links?


Chris Zink refers to this in her books; one link:
http://crosskeysbooks.com/newsdesk_i...newsdesk_id=68

A google on "growth plates activity canine" brings up a lot
of references.

I know this is the same reason people say not to let
children lift weights. But, we certainly don't tell
children not to jump and play or run or play sports.


Heh, kids don't regulary jump their own height and have a
*slightly* better idea of self-preservation.

So... I'm just wondering why people think a child running
won't damage the growth plates, but for a dog it will. Not
trying to flame you just asking.


Legitimate questions aren't flames.

--
--Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
 




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