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Train Your Dog With Respect



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 3rd 04, 03:48 AM
Mark Yeager
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Posts: n/a
Default Train Your Dog With Respect

Proper training of your dog should begin when he is a puppy. The
first four months of a dog's life are very important in the training
of your dog. This is when they learn behaviors that they will
practice in the future.

Socializing your dog is one of the most important things you can do to
influence your dog's future behavior. As soon as you bring your new
puppy home, you should start letting him interact with other puppies,
dogs and humans. Take your dog to parks where there will be other
pets and people. Ask your friends if it is okay for your dog to visit
their dog at their home or yours. Puppies will learn how to get along
with other puppies and dogs if they are allowed to play with them when
they are young. Introduce your dog to new experiences. Give him
rides in the car, walk him on a leash around the park, let him hear
the vacuum cleaner running. Help your puppy get used to a regular
routine of baths, brushing , and healthy meals.

Housebreaking your puppy takes a lot of patience. Fix up a nice
little space or room for your puppy. Place his food and water bowl
there along with some favorite toys. Be sure to put newspapers all
over the floor and replace them often. When you are at home with the
puppy, let him out of his room for a short period of time to roam
around and play. Return your puppy to his room and the newspapers
after about 30-45 minutes to help with his housebreaking. Do not
punish your puppy for having an accident. It could take up to six
months before he is fully housebroken. Remember, most puppies can't
control their bladder overnight until they are about four months old.

Your puppy will undoubtedly want to chew on things he shouldn't.
Train him to leave your things alone by keeping them out of reach and
by providing him with a variety of doggy chew toys. If he chews on
your favorite slipper, don't punish him. Simply replace the slipper
with one of his own chew toys. Praise him for playing with his own
toys.

Sometimes, you will have to leave your dog home alone. Help him to
feel comfortable alone by leaving on the television or radio for
company. Leave an adequate amount of food and water. Don't forget to
leave lots of doggy toys for him to play with.

You may be having trouble training your dog. Maybe he's not
responding to your commands or seems to be ignoring you. Or maybe the
housebreaking is backfiring and your dog is having accidents all over
the house. These may be signs of a medical condition. Be sure to
visit the vet regularly to rule out things like loss of hearing or
bladder infections. Always be sure your dog is healthy, happy and
well cared for.

If you feel this job is too big for you or you just want some
additional instruction or behavioral training for your dog,, there are
many reputable professional dog trainers and obedience schools. Do
some research and ask questions to find the right school for your dog.

Most importantly, you must be a responsible owner in order to train
them properly. If you want your dog to trust and respect you, you
must do the same in return. Never hit, kick, or slap your dog.
Include your dog in family outings and games and general family life.
Do not play aggressive games with them as this can cause them to
behave aggressively. Reward good behavior and yet do not spoil your
dog. Remember, if you practice lots of patience, love and respect for
your dog, you will receive the same from him.

Published by: Wendy Yeager
http://www.wenmarcorp.com/dogs-go2
  #2  
Old September 27th 04, 08:00 PM
John
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Ahhhh...finally someone in this group who knows how to treat a
dog/puppy properly. I have no idea why some of you insist on buying
sticks to train your dogs...only $39.95...be the first on your street
to have yours. Perhaps you can get a discount if you buy a shocker and
choker as well. Another good one is hitting your puppy for chewing on
their leash. They are puppies, they are doing what puppies are
supposed to do, play.

It seems to me that many of you treat your dogs like possessions.
Possessions you feel the need to CONTROL. If you have kids, raising
dogs is like raising kids, its common sense.

(Mark Yeager) wrote in message . com...
Proper training of your dog should begin when he is a puppy. The
first four months of a dog's life are very important in the training
of your dog. This is when they learn behaviors that they will
practice in the future.

Socializing your dog is one of the most important things you can do to
influence your dog's future behavior. As soon as you bring your new
puppy home, you should start letting him interact with other puppies,
dogs and humans. Take your dog to parks where there will be other
pets and people. Ask your friends if it is okay for your dog to visit
their dog at their home or yours. Puppies will learn how to get along
with other puppies and dogs if they are allowed to play with them when
they are young. Introduce your dog to new experiences. Give him
rides in the car, walk him on a leash around the park, let him hear
the vacuum cleaner running. Help your puppy get used to a regular
routine of baths, brushing , and healthy meals.

Housebreaking your puppy takes a lot of patience. Fix up a nice
little space or room for your puppy. Place his food and water bowl
there along with some favorite toys. Be sure to put newspapers all
over the floor and replace them often. When you are at home with the
puppy, let him out of his room for a short period of time to roam
around and play. Return your puppy to his room and the newspapers
after about 30-45 minutes to help with his housebreaking. Do not
punish your puppy for having an accident. It could take up to six
months before he is fully housebroken. Remember, most puppies can't
control their bladder overnight until they are about four months old.

Your puppy will undoubtedly want to chew on things he shouldn't.
Train him to leave your things alone by keeping them out of reach and
by providing him with a variety of doggy chew toys. If he chews on
your favorite slipper, don't punish him. Simply replace the slipper
with one of his own chew toys. Praise him for playing with his own
toys.

Sometimes, you will have to leave your dog home alone. Help him to
feel comfortable alone by leaving on the television or radio for
company. Leave an adequate amount of food and water. Don't forget to
leave lots of doggy toys for him to play with.

You may be having trouble training your dog. Maybe he's not
responding to your commands or seems to be ignoring you. Or maybe the
housebreaking is backfiring and your dog is having accidents all over
the house. These may be signs of a medical condition. Be sure to
visit the vet regularly to rule out things like loss of hearing or
bladder infections. Always be sure your dog is healthy, happy and
well cared for.

If you feel this job is too big for you or you just want some
additional instruction or behavioral training for your dog,, there are
many reputable professional dog trainers and obedience schools. Do
some research and ask questions to find the right school for your dog.

Most importantly, you must be a responsible owner in order to train
them properly. If you want your dog to trust and respect you, you
must do the same in return. Never hit, kick, or slap your dog.
Include your dog in family outings and games and general family life.
Do not play aggressive games with them as this can cause them to
behave aggressively. Reward good behavior and yet do not spoil your
dog. Remember, if you practice lots of patience, love and respect for
your dog, you will receive the same from him.

Published by: Wendy Yeager
http://www.wenmarcorp.com/dogs-go2
  #3  
Old September 27th 04, 08:37 PM
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 27 Sep 2004 12:00:40 -0700 John whittled these words:
Ahhhh...finally someone in this group who knows how to treat a
dog/puppy properly. I have no idea why some of you insist on buying
sticks to train your dogs...only $39.95...


Who does that? Be specific. Reference the original post(s) to support
your reaction so that we can put it into context.

What kind of stick, and how is the stick used? And why is a stick
necessarily a bad thing? I use a target stick. Do you know what that is,
and how it is used? If you search google for
"target stick"
(include the quotes) you can get an idea. But I've never bought one.

be the first on your street
to have yours. Perhaps you can get a discount if you buy a shocker and
choker as well. Another good one is hitting your puppy for chewing on
their leash. They are puppies, they are doing what puppies are


Who here has ever suggested hitting a puppy for anything at all? Be
specific. Provide a reference for the orignal post(s) to show the basis
of your reaction. Don't rely on someone's claims that something was
posted. I want to see the original posting, and so should you.

supposed to do, play.


Well yes. Many of us encourage leash tugging as a reward.

It seems to me that many of you treat your dogs like possessions.


I'm sure there are people like that. I can't think of people I would put
in that category.

Possessions you feel the need to CONTROL. If you have kids, raising
dogs is like raising kids, its common sense.


Dogs need a balance of fun, and structure. They need the
security of knowing what is expected of them, and the freedom to explore
and learn. I wouldn't call it a matter of "common sense" since
understanding the needs of others is not exactly common.

The specific advice you are responding to, however, has a lot of
information that I suggest is counter-productive. It tends to be confusing
and lead to greater puppy-human conflict when a dog is first taught it is
OK to relieve itself indoors, and then later expected to never do so.
Housetraining can be accomplished far more quickly and with less conflict
with newer methods than offered by the person you are responding to.

The OP is correct that socialization is critical. However, in my
experience the advice to use a dog park to accomplish that socialization
often backfires. Too many clueless people at the dog park. It is far
safer and more effective to socialize puppies with people who are known to
you, known to be repsonsible, and who will comply with your requests to
not allow obsessive harassment etc that will result in a fearful rather
than confident puppy.

Overall the information in the post seems to have been derived from
training books in the 1960's - much has changed since then.

--
Diane Blackman
http://dog-play.com/
http://dogplay.com/Shop/
  #4  
Old November 3rd 04, 08:39 PM
jdw
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

John Fisher is one of the best dog training authors I've ever read.
He uses no force......just pure dog psychology.
 




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