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Significance of over bite



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 10th 03, 11:26 PM
Deb
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Default Significance of over bite

What is the rate of
growth for maxillary and mandibular growth? Does the lower jaw grow faster
or more than the upper, therefore in a reasonable amount of time, say by
adolesence, the jaws would have had an end to end, or normal bite?


Heck if I know, but I looked at the breed standard on a couple of sites and
they do mention some factoids on the bite, teeth and something called 'wry
mouth'?

http://www.akc.org/breeds/recbreeds/bostoter.cfm


http://www.ankc.aust.com/bostterr.htm


Deb
Shi the Elder
Georgie the Kid-Snarker
  #2  
Old July 11th 03, 01:03 AM
bentcajungirl
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Thank you Christy and I really mean it sincerely. I have enough street
smarts and having been in business for myself for many years, I am not
easily scammed. I am a doubting Thomas. I will appear to the "salesperson"
to be an easy mark, but in my mind, I am cataloging how many times that
sales pitch has contradicted itself. The older I get (ugh, I NEVER thought
I'd say that) the more information I gather before I make a decision. To
me, having a dog become a part of my family is a serious deal. I may not be
right for all dogs and vice versa. And I have my Lucee, the Rat Terrier, in
the mix, too. My awareness of dogs, their behaviors, my behavior and how it
affects them, et al, has gone way up since I've been a participant in this
group. I may look at a dozen more dogs before the right one comes along.
If the karma isn't right, then it just ain't right. Right?
The Bostons are cute though, really silly cheerful little dogs.
Perry
bentcajungirl
"Christy" wrote in message
...

"bentcajungirl" wrote in message
...

I don't know what you mean about me running across these "back yard
breeders". Just because I am looking doesn't mean I am contributing to

their
breeding tactics.


I understand, but the more you look at puppies from BYB types, the more
likely it is that one will capture your heart and you'll end up buying

one.
I was just trying to suggest that you steer clear of those folks.

If you are referring to the fact that I am willing to adopt a puppy from

the
same "lady down the street" where I got Maggie, then oh well.


I can't say that I think this is a great idea either, but I understand why
you'd go that route.

I agree that
spay neuter is the best scenario, and that rescue is the ideal

situation,
but for right now, I am exploring ALL options. If I weren't willing to
explore, I wouldn't ask questions....I would just act on impulse. And

even
if I find what I think is a great reputable breeder, I will still ask
questions. Isn't that what this group is all about? I don't think one

is
ever done learning...


I wasn't trying to discourage you from asking questions on the group;

sorry
if it came across that way. What I meant was, if you find someone who has
puppies and is someone you can trust, it is a great source of help, as
opposed to someone who will tell you whatever they think will sell a

puppy.

Christy





  #3  
Old July 11th 03, 03:20 AM
bentcajungirl
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I am partial to the underbites. Dentally, they are known as class 3. This
little dog last night had the opposite, an overbite and an extreme one at
that. I sensed many more problems with a lower jaw smaller than the upper.
My Maggie was worse than Mandi and never had any problems other than what
you mentioned with Mandi.
Perry
bentcajungirl
"Tara O." wrote in message
...
One of our rescues had a *very* severe underbite. It took Mandi a long

time
to find a home because of her looks. We checked with a specialist about
possible surgery for her but she was never in pain and the procedure would
have been extensive and painful to her so we left it alone. The only
problems Mandi has a

1. hard time eating small kibble pieces
2. sloppy drinker
3. tongue hangs out

Here are some pics:

http://cbr.homestead.com/files/mandi/mandi3.jpg

http://cbr.homestead.com/files/mandi/mandi.jpg

http://cbr.homestead.com/files/mandi/manditongue.jpg

--
Tara




  #4  
Old July 11th 03, 02:24 PM
Gwen Watson
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Christy wrote:



I have seen more underbites correct themselves
than overbites, though.

Christy


Christy this is interesting to me. I don't believe I have
ever seen a dog with an overbite. Many underbites
but I am not aware of seeing a dog with an overbite.

Are they not as obvious?

Gwen

  #5  
Old July 11th 03, 06:55 PM
culprit
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"Tara O." wrote in message
...
One of our rescues had a *very* severe underbite. It took Mandi a long

time
to find a home because of her looks. We checked with a specialist about
possible surgery for her but she was never in pain and the procedure would
have been extensive and painful to her so we left it alone. The only
problems Mandi has a

1. hard time eating small kibble pieces
2. sloppy drinker
3. tongue hangs out

Here are some pics:

http://cbr.homestead.com/files/mandi/mandi3.jpg

http://cbr.homestead.com/files/mandi/mandi.jpg

http://cbr.homestead.com/files/mandi/manditongue.jpg


OMG, she's adorable, in a very silly way.

i'd fall in love with a girl like that right away. i can't imagine she was
hard to adopt out. how could anyone resist that face?

-kelly


  #6  
Old July 11th 03, 08:07 PM
Christy
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"Gwen Watson" wrote in message
...

Christy this is interesting to me. I don't believe I have
ever seen a dog with an overbite. Many underbites
but I am not aware of seeing a dog with an overbite.

Are they not as obvious?


I think underbites are more obvious, yes. Especially in the big jawed bully
breeds, where you get that whole Winston Churchill thing going on, with
teeth sticking out and so on. It is adorable on those dogs, but on
long-muzzled dogs, underbites look awkward instead of cute. They look like
they are jutting their chin out. Overbites on long-muzzled dogs are often
not really visible until you open the mouth to look at the bite, though
sometimes it just looks like the dog never closes its mouth (the lips do not
meet.) You probably wouldn't notice an overbite at just a glance unless it
was really bad.

Christy


  #7  
Old July 11th 03, 08:57 PM
Chris Jung
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"Christy" wrote in message
...

"Gwen Watson" wrote in message
...

Christy this is interesting to me. I don't believe I have
ever seen a dog with an overbite. Many underbites
but I am not aware of seeing a dog with an overbite.

Are they not as obvious?


I think underbites are more obvious, yes. Especially in the big jawed

bully
breeds, where you get that whole Winston Churchill thing going on, with
teeth sticking out and so on. It is adorable on those dogs, but on
long-muzzled dogs, underbites look awkward instead of cute. They look like
they are jutting their chin out. Overbites on long-muzzled dogs are often
not really visible until you open the mouth to look at the bite, though
sometimes it just looks like the dog never closes its mouth (the lips do

not
meet.) You probably wouldn't notice an overbite at just a glance unless it
was really bad.

Christy


Undershot jaws (another way to say overbite) in collies are more common than
underbite. They are not very obvious unless you look for it. Dino had a
definite undershot jaw. In collies the bad ones like Dino's are called shark
jaws - the lower jaw tends to lack depth (i.e. lack much of a chin to it) as
well as be short. If you take a shark jawed collie like Dino and point his
nose straight up, it actually does look like the picture of the shark in the
Jaws movie poster (i.e.the lips don't meet and you can see the teeth).
http://makeashorterlink.com/?X63E13C35

In fact Dino's undershot jaw was the basis of one of our MOST stupid pet
tricks: To start, Dino sat between my feet, facing outward. I would hold a
little buxom blond doll (in a swimming pose) about 12 inches above his head
and start to hum the Jaws Theme: "dun na du na du-na dun-na duna duna
dunadunadunnaDUN-NA." On the first "dun-na", Dino would point his nose
straight up in a pretty good shark imitation. He would hold the pose until I
got to the big "NA" when he would give a little lunge up and chomp the doll.

Chris and her smoothies and one scruffy,
Zeffie, Pablo and Bode


  #8  
Old July 11th 03, 08:58 PM
Gwen Watson
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Default



Chris Jung wrote:



In fact Dino's undershot jaw was the basis of one of our MOST stupid pet
tricks: To start, Dino sat between my feet, facing outward. I would hold a
little buxom blond doll (in a swimming pose) about 12 inches above his head
and start to hum the Jaws Theme: "dun na du na du-na dun-na duna duna
dunadunadunnaDUN-NA." On the first "dun-na", Dino would point his nose
straight up in a pretty good shark imitation. He would hold the pose until I
got to the big "NA" when he would give a little lunge up and chomp the doll.

Chris and her smoothies and one scruffy,
Zeffie, Pablo and Bode


Hey that's a great story and trick. Funny.

Gwen


  #10  
Old July 12th 03, 02:41 AM
Rocky
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Christy said in rec.pets.dogs.behavior:

The lower jaw can grow at a different rate from the upper,
but often a bad bite stays a bad bite.


When I adopted Friday, his medical papers said that his puppy
canines had been removed because his jaws were growing at
different rates. I'd never heard of such a thing.

--
--Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
 




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