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Choosing a trainer



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 14th 03, 04:41 PM
Jayjay
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Default Choosing a trainer

I've decided to take Chloe and myself back to obediance training.
The first trainer I used was recommended by my vet. But her
techniques did not work very well with Chloe (prong collar training -
similar to Leah's post froma couple weeks ago).

Looking in the yellow pages of the phone book, there are 9 listings
under dog training. Most of them are a good 1/2hr + drive for me to
go to. Some have websites - but are either down or not up to date.
Non really list what kind of training besides saying they give
"private lessons" or something.

How do you choose a trainer?
  #2  
Old July 14th 03, 04:52 PM
Gwen Watson
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Jayjay wrote:



How do you choose a trainer?


References from others who have gone is one good way.

I also advise people to attend the first training class
without their dog and take notes. Then go to
last two final classses and see how many
students remain. Most of the time training
classes will start off with a high volume of
enrollees. But often by the last class there
will only be 3-4 remaining. It speaks volumes
*if* there are still many remaining.

These are just a few ways of chosing a trainer.

Gwen



  #3  
Old July 14th 03, 05:02 PM
Suja
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Jayjay wrote:

Looking in the yellow pages of the phone book, there are 9 listings
under dog training. Most of them are a good 1/2hr + drive for me to
go to. Some have websites - but are either down or not up to date.
Non really list what kind of training besides saying they give
"private lessons" or something.

How do you choose a trainer?


Generally, word of mouth is good. If you know other people with well
behaved dogs, ask them if they took the dog to obedience training and
where. People at the dog park (if you have one close) can be great for
that. Lots of times, local rescues and shelters have lists of trainers
that they recommend. Search online as well. Organizations such as the
APDT (not an endorsement, just giving you ideas) will allow you to
search for trainers http://tinyurl.com/gvus or
http://www.apdt.com/trainers-and-own...-a-trainer.htm


Once you have a list, call them up. Tell them what you're interested in
doing, ask them whether they offer such classes, when, how long they
last, what is covered in the curriculum, what sort of methods are used
for teaching, etc. If the person you speak with can't help, ask if they
can offer any recommendations. When you think you've found some
trainers you can work with, ask if you can come and watch them work. It
will give you some idea of the trainer's skills, and you can determine
if this is someone you'd like to work with. Just FYI, I've known lots
of trainers who were good at what they do, but has really terrible
people skills, so choose someone you can be comfortable with.

Suja



  #4  
Old July 14th 03, 09:29 PM
Julia Altshuler
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I learned a lot by simply calling the trainer, explaining my situation with my
dog and engaging the trainer in conversation. My veterinarian recommended 2
trainers with very different philosophies and techniques. I called them both,
asked broad questions and was surprised by how revealing they were over the
phone. With one guy, I'd told him about the 2 classes I'd tried and how they
hadn't worked for me and my dog. I gave him a ton of information about what I
WASN'T looking for. He listened and then got all chatty and told me what he
does-- which sounded amazingly like what I'd just said had been a disaster. I
enjoyed talking to him, thanked him and hung up the phone. I called the other
number, chatted in much the same way, decided I liked what I heard for the most
part, got her resume, and then, not knowing what half the things on the resume
meant, asked here for a little more advice. I hired that trainer and liked her.

--Lia


Jayjay wrote:

How do you choose a trainer?

  #5  
Old July 15th 03, 08:10 AM
roo
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"Gwen Watson" wrote in message
...

References from others who have gone is one good way.

I also advise people to attend the first training class without their dog

and take notes. Then go to last two final classses and see how many students
remain. Most of the time training classes will start off with a high volume
of enrollees. But often by the last class there will only be 3-4 remaining.
It speaks volumes *if* there are still many remaining.

These are just a few ways of chosing a trainer.


Yes, asking around is a good idea, especially asking people who have good
control of their dogs, as someone else says. It's well worth going to the
training class without the dog, not only to check out the trainer, and
whether the atomosphere in class is one you'd want to subject your dog to,
also you get more from a class if you have some idea of what they do, and
why they do it. Talking to the trainer about what you want to achieve can
help too. Some trainers have their own ideas of what they want you to teach
your dog, and they don't always coincide with yours. It helps to find
trainers that know and like your particular breed of dog. Some trainers here
are very good with border collies, for example, and not so good with other
breeds. The label is perhaps not so important. Some trainers seem to call
themselves 'positive' just as a marketing tool. A good trainer (for me)
should be flexible, and able to adjust their methods to what you are
comfortable with, and also be able to communicate well with you - not show
off about how much they could teach your dog, but help you to establish a
better relationship with your dog. They should also be able to help you
'read' your dog better. It's highly skilled work, at its best. The bottom
line is 'go with your gut feeling' about what you feel about a trainer, IMO.

Alikat


--
see Rug and Conor on www.infopet.co.uk



  #6  
Old July 16th 03, 10:11 PM
Jayjay
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On Tue, 15 Jul 2003 08:10:23 +0100, "roo" wrote:

"Gwen Watson" wrote in message
...

References from others who have gone is one good way.

I also advise people to attend the first training class without their dog

and take notes. Then go to last two final classses and see how many students
remain. Most of the time training classes will start off with a high volume
of enrollees. But often by the last class there will only be 3-4 remaining.
It speaks volumes *if* there are still many remaining.

These are just a few ways of chosing a trainer.


Yes, asking around is a good idea, especially asking people who have good
control of their dogs, as someone else says.


Actually - I did ask around before the first round - and most people
that I spoke to in my neighborhood had used the woman I initially went
to. My vet recommended her, and as a matter of fact - had her
blackmouth cur in the class with us. Of the 8 or more people I spoke
to, 1 pulled the dog out saying it was too ruff (they have a beagal
and this thing is not obedient at all) and anothe siad their dog
failed the class (their dog is not well socialized, they let it off
leash, came into my yard with her kids and attacked Chloe one day. )
The other ones said she did a good job. One neighbor had her irish
setter trained by her back over 20 yrs ago. (no, she doesn't still
have the dog). That's why I chose her.

But, her method of training is to use a choke and yank. Example:
When I asked that trainer how to train Chloe so she doesn't jump on
the furniture her response was. Get a choke chain and a 6' length of
rope and tie it to the dog. IF the dog chews the rope in 1/2 just
re-tie the rope back on. If you see the dog on the couch, sneak up,
grab the rope and yank the dog off the couch then walk away.

That is the sort of training she taugh and how I went through the
initial 8 week obedience. Using force like that on Chloe only causes
her to 1. yelp, (which the trainer said is just attention getting
methods). 2. Use her paws to block the leash if she doesn't want to
follow a command so that it restricts the ability to yank. and 3.
get jumpy - not aggressive - but she will bark and jump and go in the
opposite direction of what you want. Totally protesting the action.

Granted - this doesn't happen all the time. Chloe has commands like
sit, laydown, stay (well, when on a leash, not off leash) as well as
come (sometimes she takes her time).

I need different training

I've spoken to 1 guy at work who I knew had a dog go through training.
THe school he went to is no longer in business. And, when telling
him the methods we used - those were the same methods he was taught
with his dogs. (2 golden retrievers).

Another woman I spoke to at work who took her Cav. King Charles to
obedience said she would not recommend the place she went to - it was
horrible.

I only know of one other person with a dog who is now up toe the
agility training level. The one thing I do know about his dog is it
is very excitable and does do the excitable urinating. But he loves
his dog to death is goes on and on about his agility trials. I need
to track him down and ask where they are going.




 




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