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And a little dog shall lead them



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 15th 03, 04:49 AM
Chris Williams
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Default And a little dog shall lead them

Science is beginning to catch up with what dog owners have always known.
There is a wonderful article in the July 21 edition of Newsweek, page
45, entitled "Animal Emotions."

Writer Mary Carmichael offers evidence of animal emotion, notes that
scientists have been slow to admit to such a thing, but then writes,
"With new evidence gleaned from studies of dogs, chimps and sundry other
creatures, science is starting to catch up to what pet owners have
always suspected: animals experience surges of deep-seated fear,
jealousy and grief=97and, most important, love. Unlike the few
researchers who came before them, the scientists leading the new
movement actually have solid evidence."

Biologist Marc Bekoff is quoted:
"Five years ago my colleagues would have thought I was off my rocker.
But now scientists are finally starting to talk about animal emotions in
public. It's like they're coming out of the closet."
Jane Goodall's groundbreaking work in the field is discussed.

In a section headed "Prozac for Pets," Carmichael notes that a form of
Prozac is increasingly being prescribed for dogs, and asks, "If animals
didn't have moods mediated by the same neurotransmitters as humans, why
would they react to our mood lifters?"

There is a great quote from Lisa Parr, who studies chimpanzee empathy at
Emory (ironically, home of the infamous Yerkes primate lab):
=A0=A0"I'm sure there's still a bunch of old curmudgeons thinking that
everything is stimulus and response."

The article suggests that we will soon have answers to questions animal
lovers have been asking for years, then closes on this wonderful note:
"And we'll have some newer questions, too: is it fair to keep emotional
beings cooped up in kennels, cages and small backyards? If rats and
rabbits feel, how can we justify experimenting on them? Research on farm
animals is just starting=97what will it mean for our eating habits? And
can our pets really love us back? The last of those, at least, is
already solved. The answer, no matter whom you ask, is yes."

You can read the full article on line at:
http://www.msnbc.com/news/937679.asp




















Just because humans are slow and can't smell or hear
very well doesn't mean they don't possess a primitive
type of intelligence.


  #2  
Old July 15th 03, 12:59 PM
Alison
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Posts: n/a
Default

Hi Chris ,
I think an article by Bekoff was printed in New Scientist a little
while ago . I think to say animals don't have emotions is b*llocks
and big headed of us to think that emotions are human emotions and
belong to us only .
We're programmed to have feelings like love (what ever that is ) ,
jealously , fear. They're basic instincts and part of survival .
--
Alison
"Chris Williams" wrote in message
...
Science is beginning to catch up with what dog owners have always
known.
There is a wonderful article in the July 21 edition of Newsweek, page
45, entitled "Animal Emotions."

Writer Mary Carmichael offers evidence of animal emotion, notes that
scientists have been slow to admit to such a thing, but then writes,
"With new evidence gleaned from studies of dogs, chimps and sundry
other
creatures, science is starting to catch up to what pet owners have
always suspected: animals experience surges of deep-seated fear,
jealousy and grief-and, most important, love. Unlike the few
researchers who came before them, the scientists leading the new
movement actually have solid evidence."

Biologist Marc Bekoff is quoted:
"Five years ago my colleagues would have thought I was off my rocker.
But now scientists are finally starting to talk about animal emotions
in
public. It's like they're coming out of the closet."
Jane Goodall's groundbreaking work in the field is discussed.

In a section headed "Prozac for Pets," Carmichael notes that a form of
Prozac is increasingly being prescribed for dogs, and asks, "If
animals
didn't have moods mediated by the same neurotransmitters as humans,
why
would they react to our mood lifters?"

There is a great quote from Lisa Parr, who studies chimpanzee empathy
at
Emory (ironically, home of the infamous Yerkes primate lab):
"I'm sure there's still a bunch of old curmudgeons thinking that
everything is stimulus and response."

The article suggests that we will soon have answers to questions
animal
lovers have been asking for years, then closes on this wonderful note:
"And we'll have some newer questions, too: is it fair to keep
emotional
beings cooped up in kennels, cages and small backyards? If rats and
rabbits feel, how can we justify experimenting on them? Research on
farm
animals is just starting-what will it mean for our eating habits? And
can our pets really love us back? The last of those, at least, is
already solved. The answer, no matter whom you ask, is yes."

You can read the full article on line at:
http://www.msnbc.com/news/937679.asp




















Just because humans are slow and can't smell or hear
very well doesn't mean they don't possess a primitive
type of intelligence.



  #3  
Old July 15th 03, 03:50 PM
Tricia9999
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I'm finishing up a book called _When Elephants Weep_ that's also about
animal emotion. Although the author draws from scientific studies, the
book is poorly and haphazardly referenced, which is annoying because I'd
like to look up some of the stuff he cited. It sounds similar to the
article you mention, although I haven't read the article yet.


Any book by Jeffrey Masson is going to annoy. He is a doofus. He also wrote
"Dogs Never Lie About Love", one of the few books I wanted to throw against the
wall!
 




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