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Two not-so-good things



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 18th 03, 08:48 PM
D.Currie
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Default Two not-so-good things

Yesterday, I was at my accountant's house and she brought home a chocolate
ice cream cone from McDonald's for her dog. As she was putting it in the
dish, I said, "Do you know that chocolate is bad for dogs?" to which she
replied, "Yes, I know, but it's my dog and he likes it."

Aaargh.

To her credit, she adopted this old dog from her neighbor when the neighbor
moved, and she built him steps so he could get into the car without needing
to jump. It's not the type of dog that would have easily found a home
elsewhere, so it's good that he at least has a home. The dog is old, slow,
overweight. Even if it wasn't eating chocolate (and I have no idea how
often that happens) it wouldn't have too many years left.

Maybe she thinks of it like someone who's eighty years old with cancer and
still smokes cigarettes -- like it's not going to make much difference
either way.

And then last night, I noticed that Dax was scratching her ear, shaking her
head. I told my husband that she'd probably need to go to the vet (he hadn't
noticed, it was pretty subtle at that point). Then she went into a frenzy of
head shaking, tilting her head, scratching at the ear.

I called the vet, got the answering service, and he called me back. Told me
to swab out the ear with vinegar and water. If it wasn't better by morning,
he'd take a look.

So I swabbed, and today she's fine.

At least that's good.

--



  #2  
Old July 18th 03, 08:50 PM
Holier Than Thou
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"D.Currie" wrote in
:

Yesterday, I was at my accountant's house and she brought home a
chocolate ice cream cone from McDonald's for her dog. As she was
putting it in the dish, I said, "Do you know that chocolate is bad for
dogs?" to which she replied, "Yes, I know, but it's my dog and he
likes it."

Aaargh.

To her credit, she adopted this old dog from her neighbor when the
neighbor moved, and she built him steps so he could get into the car
without needing to jump. It's not the type of dog that would have
easily found a home elsewhere, so it's good that he at least has a
home. The dog is old, slow, overweight. Even if it wasn't eating
chocolate (and I have no idea how often that happens) it wouldn't have
too many years left.



I hate to say this but the amount of chocolate in a mcdonalds ice cream
cone is pretty small. Its probably ok. I wouldnt' do it, but it
probably will not hurt the dog.



I called the vet, got the answering service, and he called me back.
Told me to swab out the ear with vinegar and water. If it wasn't
better by morning, he'd take a look.

So I swabbed, and today she's fine.

At least that's good.



That is good. Thank yo for helping the poor old doggie.

--
BethF, Anchorage, AK
  #3  
Old July 18th 03, 08:53 PM
Melissa S. Frye
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Default



"D.Currie" wrote in message
...
The dog is old, slow,
overweight. Even if it wasn't eating chocolate (and I have no idea how
often that happens) it wouldn't have too many years left.


The tiny amount of chocolate in ice cream is going to have NO effect on this
dog. The fat in the ice cream is actually what is bad!
The dosage is dependant on the dog, but dogs have to eat quite a bit for
their to be any effects- and chocolate flavored items contain very little
actually chocolate. There are a few dogs that are super sensitive, but they
are very rare.

And chocolate has no lasting or cumulative effects.

I feed hunter Oreos all the time. He loves them, I don't give him much.

Mostly I use chocolate is bad for dogs as an excuse not to share .


--
Melissa S. Frye
Skyrocket cockers www.mfrye.com/skyrocket/



  #4  
Old July 18th 03, 09:11 PM
D.Currie
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"Holier Than Thou" wrote in message
. 3.44...
"D.Currie" wrote in
:

Yesterday, I was at my accountant's house and she brought home a
chocolate ice cream cone from McDonald's for her dog. As she was
putting it in the dish, I said, "Do you know that chocolate is bad for
dogs?" to which she replied, "Yes, I know, but it's my dog and he
likes it."

Aaargh.

To her credit, she adopted this old dog from her neighbor when the
neighbor moved, and she built him steps so he could get into the car
without needing to jump. It's not the type of dog that would have
easily found a home elsewhere, so it's good that he at least has a
home. The dog is old, slow, overweight. Even if it wasn't eating
chocolate (and I have no idea how often that happens) it wouldn't have
too many years left.



I hate to say this but the amount of chocolate in a mcdonalds ice cream
cone is pretty small. Its probably ok. I wouldnt' do it, but it
probably will not hurt the dog.


That's good to know. My dogs have gotten chocolate accidentally, but
considering there are so many other things they like, I'd opt for the ones
that are less likely to cause problems if I'm choosing to give them a
special treat.

Besides, the chocolate is MINE. :-)


--
Donna

"It's even worse than that. Sometimes I think I'm living in a perpendicular
universe."


  #5  
Old July 19th 03, 08:03 PM
Nomdeplume
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On Fri, 18 Jul 2003 13:48:19 -0600, "D.Currie"
wrote:



Hi,
The culprit in chocolate is thiobromine. (I believe - it is close
anyway). The only form that it is found in sufficient amounts to
cause reactions is in baking chocolate. (Baker's Chocolate, Nestle
baking chocolate, etc.)

Milk chocolate, chocolate chips, etc do not contain enough to cause a
dog problems. And ice cream certainly would not.

I am trying to figure out if "eating" chocolate, that is to say candy
intended for making candy containing at least 70% chocolate liquor
contains the thio. I go low=carb and can have many treats with
this type of chocolate, since it has a high choc/sugar ratio. But
I'd hate to pay the consequences if my dogs got into them.

I have befriended the local chocolatier and the family has no answer
for me except to say that the two substances are vastly different and
that baking choc is practically useless in making candy.

If anyone has any info, I'd be grateful.

SD

BTW, I'd argue that the fat is not so bad as the sugar is for your
dog. Not that either are good.
  #6  
Old July 20th 03, 02:19 AM
BethF
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"Nomdeplume" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 18 Jul 2003 13:48:19 -0600, "D.Currie"
wrote:



Hi,
The culprit in chocolate is thiobromine. (I believe - it is close
anyway). The only form that it is found in sufficient amounts to
cause reactions is in baking chocolate. (Baker's Chocolate, Nestle
baking chocolate, etc.)

Milk chocolate, chocolate chips, etc do not contain enough to cause a
dog problems. And ice cream certainly would not.





Milk chocolate can hurt a dog if they eat enough. A friends toy poodle ate
an entire bag of chocolate chips and got very sick, and almost died but the
vet found a chocolate chip stuck in his fur and figured out what was wrong
with him and saved him.;


I am trying to figure out if "eating" chocolate, that is to say candy
intended for making candy containing at least 70% chocolate liquor
contains the thio. I go low=carb and can have many treats with
this type of chocolate, since it has a high choc/sugar ratio. But
I'd hate to pay the consequences if my dogs got into them.



Low carb chocolate still has chocolate in it. Its only sugar thats lacking.

I gather that a dog can eat 1 milk chocolate bar per 10 pounds of dog
without ill effects.
Dark chocolate much less.


  #7  
Old July 22nd 03, 03:51 AM
Rocky
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Default

Nomdeplume said in rec.pets.dogs.behavior:

If anyone has any info, I'd be grateful.


I posted the following a few weeks ago to rpd.health - I was a
little incensed as to how lightly people treated their dogs'
ingestion of milk chocolate. In this case, it was 4 pounds!

Whichever link works better for you:
Message-ID: [email protected]
http://snurl.com/1utw

Good sites to bookmark:
http://vin.com/mainpub/xmas/chocolate_tox.asp
http://hersheys.com/nutrition_consum...obromine.shtml
http://mirabos.bham.ac.uk/ukclub/toxicchoc.htm
http://www.dogownersdigest.com/news/...oisoning.shtml

--
--Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
  #8  
Old July 22nd 03, 04:19 AM
Supergoof
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Default

"Nomdeplume" wrote ...
contains the thio. I go low=carb and can have many treats with
this type of chocolate, since it has a high choc/sugar ratio. But
I'd hate to pay the consequences if my dogs got into them.


Knowing the effect that the sugar alcohols have on me when I eat more than 1
or two small sugar-free candies, I'd sure hate for the dog to get into them!
(maltitol is not my friend)

)

Rachel
(New Zealand)


 




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