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Teaching "no jump" on strangers



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 22nd 03, 01:41 AM
Michelle V.
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Default Teaching "no jump" on strangers


"Jayjay" wrote in message
...
I've noticed a great deal of progress with Chloe recently. From the
"fetch" thing where she's willingly dropping the ball (posted about
that this weekend - no-one responded. :-( ) to the no longer
jumping on us when we come home and not pulling so hard on her leash
the last time we went for a vet visit (strange/new location).

But one thing she hasn't gotten better about yet, is getting so
excited when she sees a stranger or someone she hasn't seen in a
while. She gets so darned happy, jumps, licks, etc. And I am fully
aware that not all humans are dog lovers and enjoy that kind of
treatment from a dog.

IF she's on a leash when we meet someone - I can usually get her under
control easier. But many times this happens when someone comes to
the house and she's not on a leash.

SO, what's the best way to proceed with calming that behavior.

Yes!!!!Please, I need advice on this as well, REALLY bad. Jessie get
ssssooooooo excited at ANYONE that comes her way she has to jump up to say
hi if tey give her the time of day. I am especially concerned because shes
so small (about a foot and a half tall) she looks like a puppy (well I mean
she still is a puppy-10 months but she is about fully grown now) that kids
always want to pet her. I am so afraid she is going to knock one of these
kids over (shes a musclehead-30 lbs). I have to physically sit down with her
and hold her by her collar really tight so they can pet her and then she
still sometimes tries to jump up if shes really excited.

Its embarassing and aggravating that I cannot control my dog in these
situations. At home (away from distractions) she listens very well to sit,
lay down, enough, etc. With distractions *forget it*.
Shells


  #2  
Old July 22nd 03, 02:41 AM
sighthounds etc.
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On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 00:41:49 GMT, "Michelle V."
wrote:


"Jayjay" wrote in message
...
I've noticed a great deal of progress with Chloe recently. From the
"fetch" thing where she's willingly dropping the ball (posted about
that this weekend - no-one responded. :-( ) to the no longer
jumping on us when we come home and not pulling so hard on her leash
the last time we went for a vet visit (strange/new location).

But one thing she hasn't gotten better about yet, is getting so
excited when she sees a stranger or someone she hasn't seen in a
while. She gets so darned happy, jumps, licks, etc. And I am fully
aware that not all humans are dog lovers and enjoy that kind of
treatment from a dog.

IF she's on a leash when we meet someone - I can usually get her under
control easier. But many times this happens when someone comes to
the house and she's not on a leash.

SO, what's the best way to proceed with calming that behavior.

Yes!!!!Please, I need advice on this as well, REALLY bad. Jessie get
ssssooooooo excited at ANYONE that comes her way she has to jump up to say
hi if tey give her the time of day. I am especially concerned because shes
so small (about a foot and a half tall) she looks like a puppy (well I mean
she still is a puppy-10 months but she is about fully grown now) that kids
always want to pet her. I am so afraid she is going to knock one of these
kids over (shes a musclehead-30 lbs). I have to physically sit down with her
and hold her by her collar really tight so they can pet her and then she
still sometimes tries to jump up if shes really excited.

Its embarassing and aggravating that I cannot control my dog in these
situations. At home (away from distractions) she listens very well to sit,
lay down, enough, etc. With distractions *forget it*.


IMO the best way to handle this is by teaching the dog/pup to sit in
order to get attention. I don't mean just get attention from
strangers - - teach her to sit in the house to get attention from you,
to greet you, etc. With an excitable pup, she's still going to want
to jump on new people, but if you really work on rewarding sitting to
greet people and to get attention it will "take". Some people
recommend turning your back on the dog and ignoring it for a few
seconds if it does jump on you.

Mustang Sally

  #3  
Old July 22nd 03, 04:01 AM
jayjay
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IMO the best way to handle this is by teaching the dog/pup to sit in
order to get attention. I don't mean just get attention from
strangers - - teach her to sit in the house to get attention from you,
to greet you, etc. With an excitable pup, she's still going to want
to jump on new people, but if you really work on rewarding sitting to
greet people and to get attention it will "take". Some people
recommend turning your back on the dog and ignoring it for a few
seconds if it does jump on you.

Mustang Sally


That's the thing - when its just me - she's just fine and will sit and
doesn't jump. Its with "strangers" that she still does this with. And the
second person that posted has the same problem


  #4  
Old July 22nd 03, 04:22 AM
Tricia9999
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When people are coming over have her drag a leash so you can prevent the
enthusiastic greeting. Ask for cooperation from you friends - if she is jumping
up, they should withdraw all attention. If she has 4 on the floor, they can say
hi. If she is up again, they go away. She only gets a greeting when she remains
on the floor. You can have a bunch of treats by the door and spray them all
over the floor while friends come in. She will be distracted while they get
past the highly charged doorway. They can sit down and calmly say hi when she
comes over. But again, if she is too pushy, they don't give her attention. Keep
working on the sit so that it becomes more of a default. If I want people to
say hi to me, I have to sit.
  #5  
Old July 22nd 03, 04:24 AM
Tricia9999
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Also, if she has a favorite toy or ball, you can try engaging her in this
activity when they come to the door. Again just to get her through that
adrenaline surge at the door with distraction.
  #6  
Old July 22nd 03, 12:22 PM
Suja
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Jayjay wrote:

SO, what's the best way to proceed with calming that behavior.


On one of the homechecks that I did, the owners of the dog (something
small and fluffy) had the dog 'Go to bed' on cue. After I entered and
got settled down, she was allowed to come by and say hello. By then, I
was also better equipped to deal with the dog, as pleasantries had been
exchanged with the humans, and I was free to give all the attention the
dog wanted. She also sat right on my feet so I could say hi.

Suja
  #7  
Old July 22nd 03, 01:35 PM
shelly
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In ,
sighthounds etc. typed:

IMO the best way to handle this is by teaching the dog/pup
to sit in order to get attention.


yep. i really like having sit as a default behavior. i
didn't work on it as thoroughly with elliott (a mistake i
won't make again), but harriet has a pretty spiffy sit and
she's not afraid to use it G. when in doubt, sit and see
what happens. usually it gets an "i see you and aren't you
being so *good/cute*," but on occasion it gets a treat or an
ear rub.

Lynn K. advises teaching up and off with a box, which looks
like it would work really well. i've not tried it, but it
seems like it would be nearly fool-proof.

http://snurl.com/1ux1
or
message ID:

shelly (vicious smartypants) and elliott & harriet
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette

  #8  
Old July 22nd 03, 02:18 PM
Jayjay
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On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 08:34:57 -0400, sighthounds etc.
wrote:



Then you need to practice - - introduce her to "strangers", asking her
to sit to meet them, and rewarding with affection and treats (if she's
food motivated) until meeting strangers is no longer a novelty and
doesn't make her want to jump.

Mustang Sally


which leads to the next question. How do you find "strangers" to
practice with you so you can train your dog?

Granted - if it doesn't rain tonight - I'm taking her to the dog park
to let her have some fun. But the people there tend to frown upon
people leaving their dogs "on leash" in the park.

Finding distractions around the neighborhood isn't always easy. I
feel like going up to strangers myself and saying "Excuse me sir, can
you help me train my dog"...
  #9  
Old July 22nd 03, 02:28 PM
Suja
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Jayjay wrote:

which leads to the next question. How do you find "strangers" to
practice with you so you can train your dog?


Recruit people around you. Ask the neighbors (especially older kids) if
they will help you train your dog. You could also ask people going into
or coming out of petstores to help. Those people are most likely to
sympathize and should help.

Granted - if it doesn't rain tonight - I'm taking her to the dog park
to let her have some fun. But the people there tend to frown upon
people leaving their dogs "on leash" in the park.


Don't do it inside the dog park, although you should discourage the
people who pet her when she jumps up on them. Let them know that you're
trying to train her, and to tell her 'Off' if she starts to jump. I
know that I've done this with several dogs, even ones where the parents
didn't ask for help. You can always keep her on leash outside, and wait
by the gate for people who are entering/leaving.

Finding distractions around the neighborhood isn't always easy. I
feel like going up to strangers myself and saying "Excuse me sir, can
you help me train my dog"...


You could do that, you know. You'll be surprised by how many people
respond well when they find out that you are actually trying to instill
some manners in your pooch.

Suja
  #10  
Old July 22nd 03, 02:41 PM
shelly
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In ,
sighthounds etc. typed:

Some dogs misunderstand sit to mean "when I sit you have to
give me whatever you have/whatever I want". I have a
couple of those.


that's definitely a consideration. i've got to be careful
with harriet, or she *will* get demanding (she's little miss
bossypants, dontchaknow). it's a fine line between "if you
want my attention, then you need to sit down and mind your Ps
and Qs" and "no, just because you sat does *not* mean you are
entitled to my attention."

My Sibes and Whippets will sit for
attention, but not the Greyhounds. They know sit, but it's
not a comfortable position so they won't do it unless
there's a treat in the offing.


that's one thing in harriet's favor. she enjoys sitting and
will sit and "meditate" for long periods of time. it must be
a comfortable position for her.

Our dogs do know "off", too, and when we were having
jumping problems with the Whippet I used that, but I found
it worked better to teach him that good things happen to
dogs that sit.


that's what i've done with mine (they know off, but it's more
for getting off furniture than "don't jump on people").
sitting patiently is a Very Good Thing.

I noticed him sitting a lot more on his own
afterward, even when he wasn't soliciting attention or
goodies.


aw, what a good boy!

whenever i notice mine sitting, i ask them "who's cute?" i
figure, that way their behavior is acknowledged but they don't
get the idea that it's alright to demand attention.

The biggest problems we have with jumping on
strangers are 1) the ones who know the dogs aren't
permitted to do that, but say "I don't mind" and let them
do it anyway; and 2) the ones who don't like it but can't
get it through their heads that the word to fix it is
"off", not "down".


aarg! i have to deal with both of those. i'm not sure which
is more irritating, the people who are blase about undermining
someone's attempts to train their dogs or the people who can't
remember to say "off." humph!

shelly (vicious smartypants) and elliott & harriet
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette

 




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