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newbie just got a Husky pup, asks for info



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 24th 03, 03:20 PM
sighthounds etc.
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Default newbie just got a Husky pup, asks for info

On Thu, 24 Jul 2003 13:58:12 GMT, Ruud wrote:

Hi!

Since about 12 hours I'm the proud and oh so happy owner of a male
Husky pup. Scoured the web right away reading many a FAQ. As a usenet
fan I thought I would drop in here as well and see what the expert
owners have to say about some questions I'm left with

- I see Huskies most commonly referred to as Siberean Husky. Now I
wonder if there are other types as well then? Apart from that this is
"a" Husky we don't know anything about him.


Where did you get him? If you got him from a breeder, the breeder
should know whether or not he's purebred Siberian Husky. If he came
from an animal shelter, they can make a good guess, but may not know
for sure until he's an adult. Siberian Huskies are a specific breed
or dog. Many people refer to them as huskies; many experienced
Siberian owners refer to them as Sibes. There are also Alaskan
Huskies, which really are a mixed breed produced for sleddog racing.

- One of the things I keep reading is: do NOT let the dog off the
leash or he will get away. Now, I'm more or less used to shepherd dogs
(german and belgian) and had thought I would provide my Husk with some
running activity by taking him to the park, have a nice ball-throwing
session. I understand now that I can NOT do this? How do I excercise
the dog then? Are they really that bad at getting away?


Yes, you understand correctly that you just let your Siberian off
leash in the park. There is a world of difference between a German
Shepherd Dog (and other herding dogs) and a Siberian Husky. Sibes are
runners and seem to have an inbred wanderlust. They are also
excellent escape artists and can often climb, dig under or chew
through fences. You need to exercise your husky on leash - - - jog
with him, take up sledding or carting or another similar sport, find a
fenced area when you can let him run. BTW, not too many huskies enjoy
fetch either.

- Can I compare them in final size to say a male german shepherd
dog?


No, he'll be smaller. Males generally aren't over 60 lb, and about 24
(I think?) inches. There really isn't much to compare between an GSD
and a Siberian. g If I were you, I'd get some good breed books, or
even better, read FAQs and breed descriptions on some of the Siberian
Husky rescue groups' web sites.

- They are described as being an "everbody" friend and not being
exclusive to one person. Naturally the kids are all over him, petting
him whenever possible. Does this interfere with me establishing myself
as the alpha?


No, their friendliness to everyone should have nothing to do with him
seeing you as his leader. Siberians often train differently than
other breeds, though. A Sibe isn't necessarily going to want to do
something just because you asked him to and he loves you. Siberians
are intelligent, independent and easily bored. If you're used to
shepherds, you have some surprises coming, and I'd really suggest you
start reading! G

Mustang Sally (4 Siberians live here)

  #2  
Old July 24th 03, 03:28 PM
Gwen Watson
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"sighthounds etc." wrote:

On Thu, 24 Jul 2003 13:58:12 GMT, Ruud wrote:

Hi!

Since about 12 hours I'm the proud and oh so happy owner of a male
Husky pup. Scoured the web right away reading many a FAQ. As a usenet
fan I thought I would drop in here as well and see what the expert
owners have to say about some questions I'm left with

- I see Huskies most commonly referred to as Siberean Husky. Now I
wonder if there are other types as well then? Apart from that this is
"a" Husky we don't know anything about him.


Where did you get him? If you got him from a breeder, the breeder
should know whether or not he's purebred Siberian Husky. If he came
from an animal shelter, they can make a good guess, but may not know
for sure until he's an adult. Siberian Huskies are a specific breed
or dog. Many people refer to them as huskies; many experienced
Siberian owners refer to them as Sibes. There are also Alaskan
Huskies, which really are a mixed breed produced for sleddog racing.

- One of the things I keep reading is: do NOT let the dog off the
leash or he will get away. Now, I'm more or less used to shepherd dogs
(german and belgian) and had thought I would provide my Husk with some
running activity by taking him to the park, have a nice ball-throwing
session. I understand now that I can NOT do this? How do I excercise
the dog then? Are they really that bad at getting away?


Yes, you understand correctly that you just let your Siberian off
leash in the park. There is a world of difference between a German
Shepherd Dog (and other herding dogs) and a Siberian Husky.


Indeed. Again herding dogs often have built in recall. But don't tell
Blade this. Though OTOH he will not leave our sides further than
4'. That doesn't mean he will come right up every time to get leashed
though.

As for the OP yes Sibes and or most husky breeds do need to be
kept on leash. They have a natural built in instinct to roam and go
off and that doesn't mean you will get recall. Though I suspect a
bit of it could be taught, it wouldn't be reliable enough to ever trust.

Sibes are
runners and seem to have an inbred wanderlust. They are also
excellent escape artists and can often climb, dig under or chew
through fences.


What about electric fences? I bet they wouldn't chew or dig
under one that has had livestock electricity hooked to it. Or do
they? Just a bit of a suggestion, perhaps?

You need to exercise your husky on leash - - - jog
with him, take up sledding or carting or another similar sport,


Biking!

BTW, Go Lance GO!!!!!!!!!!

find a
fenced area when you can let him run. BTW, not too many huskies enjoy
fetch either.


That is what I was thinking but then I wondered since they do have
such prey drive?



- Can I compare them in final size to say a male german shepherd
dog?


No, he'll be smaller. Males generally aren't over 60 lb, and about 24
(I think?) inches. There really isn't much to compare between an GSD
and a Siberian. g If I were you, I'd get some good breed books, or
even better, read FAQs and breed descriptions on some of the Siberian
Husky rescue groups' web sites.


Is there an e-list for huskies? I would like to know about this as well.



- They are described as being an "everbody" friend and not being
exclusive to one person. Naturally the kids are all over him, petting
him whenever possible. Does this interfere with me establishing myself
as the alpha?


No, their friendliness to everyone should have nothing to do with him
seeing you as his leader. Siberians often train differently than
other breeds, though. A Sibe isn't necessarily going to want to do
something just because you asked him to and he loves you. Siberians
are intelligent, independent and easily bored. If you're used to
shepherds, you have some surprises coming, and I'd really suggest you
start reading! G

Mustang Sally (4 Siberians live here)


Ditto.

BTW, Sally I thought you had more than 4 sibes? I guess
you have much more GHs?

I am glad to read this advice. Of course this is one of the major
reasons I would not be a good Sibe or husky owner. I do like
to go hiking and go to off leash areas with my dogs.

Gwen


  #3  
Old July 24th 03, 03:39 PM
Melinda Shore
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Default

In article ,
Gwen Watson wrote:
Biking!


Mind the heat, though.

That is what I was thinking but then I wondered since they do have
such prey drive?


I've heard of Siberians that play fetch but I've never seen
it. Mine will happily chase anything I toss but none of
them will retrieve it.

Is there an e-list for huskies? I would like to know about this as well.


SIBERNET-L (http://www.flash.net/~dagmar/SibernetL.html)
and, for people interested in sledding or other mushing
activities, SHMushers (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SHMushers/).
--
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis -

If you don't understand how things are connected, the cause of
problems is solutions -- Amory Lovins
  #4  
Old July 24th 03, 03:43 PM
Gwen Watson
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Default



Melinda Shore wrote:

In article ,
Gwen Watson wrote:
Biking!


Mind the heat, though.


Well it certainly wouldn't be recommended in my area.



SIBERNET-L (http://www.flash.net/~dagmar/SibernetL.html)
and, for people interested in sledding or other mushing
activities, SHMushers (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SHMushers/).
--
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis -

If you don't understand how things are connected, the cause of
problems is solutions -- Amory Lovins


Thanks Melinda! I hope the OP that asked the question considers
joining one of the above to learn more about his new husky. Which
is definitely quite different than a GSD or any herding breed.

I might just poke in there for a bit.

Gwen


  #5  
Old July 24th 03, 04:43 PM
Gwen Watson
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Default



"sighthounds etc." wrote:Electric fences are useful for preventing them from
digging under or

climbing or jumping over fences. Just to be clear, we're talking
about electric fences such as used for horses.


Yes livestock electric fencing. Much different than the underground invisible
variety.



I don't think it's impossible to do that. I think that with the right
dog, under the right circumstances, and with training beginning in
puppyhood, a person could do that. The problem lies in getting all
those variables at once.

Mustang Sally


I am sure this is true.

Well I am gone for day. No online or puter.

Gwen


  #6  
Old July 24th 03, 04:50 PM
Melinda Shore
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Default

In article ,
sighthounds etc. wrote:
There's Sibernet-L, which tends to be pet-oriented and
rescue-oriented. There's also Sleddog-L. I think Melinda's on a
sleddog list, don't know if that's the one.


There are actually two mushing mailing lists specifically
oriented towards Siberians, believe it or not. There's
SHMushers, which I mentioned in another post, plus there's a
mailing list specifically for one line of dogs that's also
being registered as "Seppala Siberian Sleddogs" with the
ConKC (don't get me started). The thing about the mushing
mailing lists are that pet-type questions are specifically
disallowed.

I don't think it's impossible to do that. I think that with the right
dog, under the right circumstances, and with training beginning in
puppyhood, a person could do that. The problem lies in getting all
those variables at once.


I occasionally take some of my dogs down to the dog park and
I let Emmett, who's got an excellent recall, off-leash. The
park is huge, however, and it's well away from the road and
bordered by water on two sides (it's a very pretty place).
Still, it's not uncommon to hear stories about dogs with
"100% reliable" recalls who one day take a notion to go
a-roving.
--
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis -

If you don't understand how things are connected, the cause of
problems is solutions -- Amory Lovins
  #7  
Old July 24th 03, 05:01 PM
Suja
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Ruud wrote:

Since about 12 hours I'm the proud and oh so happy owner of a male
Husky pup.


Congratulations on your new pup! They are one of my favorite dog breeds
because they can be quite a challenge.


- One of the things I keep reading is: do NOT let the dog off the
leash or he will get away. Now, I'm more or less used to shepherd dogs
(german and belgian) and had thought I would provide my Husk with some


Nordic breeds are behaviorally QUITE different from the shepherds that
you are used to. Pleasing people just for the sake of it is not high on
the agenda. For that reason, it is really important that you establish
a good relationship with your new pup and start manners training as soon
as possible. Keep in mind that Huskies are VERY smart dogs, but easily
bored with repetition, so you might have to get creative in your
training in order to keep the pup's interest. And never try to force
your will on the dog - it is highly apt to backfire.


running activity by taking him to the park, have a nice ball-throwing
session.


Of the dozen or so Huskies I know, 1 plays fetch, a couple will chase
the ball but lose interest as soon as it stops moving and the rest look
at you like you're nuts. While most have high prey drives, this is
generally directed towards furry, 4 legged food items and not things
like balls.

I understand now that I can NOT do this? How do I excercise
the dog then? Are they really that bad at getting away?


Huskies are notorious for being escape artists, and can dig, climb or
chew their way out of fences. Do not leave your puppy outside, never
without supervision. They love to run, which of course means that they
could go quite a long ways before they run out of steam. You can jog,
take up scootering, skijoring etc. to keep your dog in good shape.


- Can I compare them in final size to say a male german shepherd
dog?


The standards say smaller than a male GSD, but I have seen oversized
Sibes as well. A couple of the males I know (rescue dogs) are well in
the 80 to 90 lb. category.


- They are described as being an "everbody" friend and not being
exclusive to one person. Naturally the kids are all over him, petting
him whenever possible. Does this interfere with me establishing myself
as the alpha?


Nope. But absolutely no heavy handed tactics in establishing your
alphaness.


- Any general tips are very welcome; I want to make this work!

Keep in mind that a bored Sibe is a force of nature, and the amount of
destruction wreaked has to be seen to be believed. They tend to be VERY
food motivated, and aren't beyond learning to open things so they can
help themselves to the goodies. A friend of mine has a Husky who opens
up the cabinets, pulls all the contents out, and leaves them on display.
He doesn't eat any of it (occasionally spills flour on the floor and
rolls around in it), but he pulls the stuff out and leaves them on the
floor, as if to let them know that he can do that. I am not trying to
scare you, just helping you prepare for live with a Sibe. They are
great dogs for someone with a good sense of humor.

http://www.siberescue.com/Breed_Info/breed_info.html
http://www.siberianhusky.8m.com/sibeinfo.htm
http://www.siberescue.com/Breed_Info..._infoindex.htm

Suja


  #8  
Old July 24th 03, 05:36 PM
Holier Than Thou
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Ruud wrote in
trotter.net:


- I see Huskies most commonly referred to as Siberean Husky. Now

I
wonder if there are other types as well then? Apart from that this is
"a" Husky we don't know anything about him.


Husky is often used as a generic term for husky-types - for example the
alaskan husky isn't really a breed - its more a certain mix of dogs.

However, in most places in this country a husky refers to a sibe of some
sort.

Can you post a photo of the guy?


- One of the things I keep reading is: do NOT let the dog off the
leash or he will get away. Now, I'm more or less used to shepherd dogs
(german and belgian) and had thought I would provide my Husk with some
running activity by taking him to the park, have a nice ball-throwing
session. I understand now that I can NOT do this? How do I excercise
the dog then? Are they really that bad at getting away?


This is something thats individual. I do know husky's both sibe and
alaskan, who are reliable off leash. But most of the ones i know aren't
and never will be. I would be getting myself a long, 40 foot leash, and
be working on recalls right from the very beginning.

For exercise he would probably like to run with a bike, or pull a
scooter!

And many husky types dont' retrieve. so don't be disappointed if he
doesnt' want to play ball with you!!





- Can I compare them in final size to say a male german shepherd
dog?



it depends on what kind of "husky" he is!!

- They are described as being an "everbody" friend and not being
exclusive to one person. Naturally the kids are all over him, petting
him whenever possible. Does this interfere with me establishing myself
as the alpha?



No. If you feed, walk and take care of him, he will know you are the
person in charge.


I personally think a husky is a great choice for kids. Mostly they
love them.


--
BethF, Anchorage, AK
  #9  
Old July 24th 03, 05:47 PM
sighthounds etc.
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On 24 Jul 2003 11:50:53 -0400, (Melinda Shore) wrote:

In article ,
sighthounds etc. wrote:


There are actually two mushing mailing lists specifically
oriented towards Siberians, believe it or not. There's
SHMushers, which I mentioned in another post, plus there's a
mailing list specifically for one line of dogs that's also
being registered as "Seppala Siberian Sleddogs" with the
ConKC (don't get me started). The thing about the mushing
mailing lists are that pet-type questions are specifically
disallowed.


I think that's understandable. They are, after all, mushing lists.

I occasionally take some of my dogs down to the dog park and
I let Emmett, who's got an excellent recall, off-leash. The
park is huge, however, and it's well away from the road and
bordered by water on two sides (it's a very pretty place).
Still, it's not uncommon to hear stories about dogs with
"100% reliable" recalls who one day take a notion to go
a-roving.


I've not done it with any of ours; just not brave enough. I probably
could, except that no matter how often we do it, Going Somewhere is so
exciting for 3/4 of them that I wouldn't trust them in an unfamiliar
environment. Mine aren't the worst wanderers in their breed, to be
sure; Tasha occasionally escaped from our first fence, but she was
either easily found or came home on her own within a couple of hours.
Nakita, while a foster dog, also escaped from the foster yard a couple
of times, and after a couple of hours, came back and crawled back
under the fence! Neither Boomer nor Mukluk have ever made even the
slightest attempt to escape. (Both lived on the streets at one time;
I wonder if that matters.) But under the right circumstances, they
might. The first day promising winter, perhaps, or a squirrel that
really needed to be eaten...

Mustang Sally
  #10  
Old July 24th 03, 06:54 PM
Tracy
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"Ruud" wrote in message
trotter.net...
Hi!

Since about 12 hours I'm the proud and oh so happy owner of a male
Husky pup. Scoured the web right away reading many a FAQ. As a usenet
fan I thought I would drop in here as well and see what the expert
owners have to say about some questions I'm left with

- I see Huskies most commonly referred to as Siberean Husky. Now I
wonder if there are other types as well then? Apart from that this is
"a" Husky we don't know anything about him.

- One of the things I keep reading is: do NOT let the dog off the
leash or he will get away. Now, I'm more or less used to shepherd dogs
(german and belgian) and had thought I would provide my Husk with some
running activity by taking him to the park, have a nice ball-throwing
session. I understand now that I can NOT do this? How do I excercise
the dog then? Are they really that bad at getting away?

- Can I compare them in final size to say a male german shepherd
dog?

- They are described as being an "everbody" friend and not being
exclusive to one person. Naturally the kids are all over him, petting
him whenever possible. Does this interfere with me establishing myself
as the alpha?

- Any general tips are very welcome; I want to make this work!

Ruud


Hi Ruud,

Here's a link for you - my dear friend in Florida is a volunteer for the
rescue of Siberian Huskies and she has put together a wonderful site - if
you click on the "Husky Ed" button, there is lots of good information that
may help and an email to contact for any advice you may need. I have heard
that Huskies are particularly challenging dogs to own and you are to be
admired owning one yourself!

http://www.siberrescue.com/

Cheers,
Tracy


 




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