A dog & canine forum. DogBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » DogBanter forum » Dog forums » Dog rescue
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Sad fact about animal rescue groups



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old February 18th 12, 07:27 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
SAMMY DOG
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default Sad fact about animal rescue groups

please disabuse me if I am incorrect....recently I have been having a
miserable time in my efforts to adopt/find another animal or two to add
to my household....no need to go into a long story, but I have not had
any help from any rescues and this had turned me sour on them. I'll
eventually sort this out on my own as usual.
Events of recent months and especially the last day or so have caused me
to think more clearly about these groups as a whole and I have come to
the conslusion that in a state like New Jersey, where I live there are
more of them than are necessary.
Nobody loves animals more than I do, but the notion of true "rescue"
seems to have gotten almost as meaningless as "shelter".
What is importantant is the number of dogs that need homes and the
number of households that will take in a dog in any given year.
Rescues are aleays in dire need of money, Why ? Largely because they
don't make enough placements and thus don't get enough fees. Why is that
? Because they are in competition with other rescues to fill a
finite/set number of openings per year. If 200 rescues can pull a
sufficient number of dogs from shelters or the street to fill all of the
open places in households who would go to a shelter or rescue then 250
rescues just glut the market, like too many restaurants in an area.
More rescues do not create more adoptors or adoptions. There will always
be enough rescue operations in N.J. to suit the need to faciitate the
movement of dogs from kill shelter to new home. They will always get
enough funding to place as many dogs as can be placed. I was almost
certain that I was going to leave big money to a rescue group, now I see
it as a waste, just propping up one group without helping dogs in the
main at all. SD

  #2  
Old February 19th 12, 03:58 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
sighthounds & siberians
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,538
Default Sad fact about animal rescue groups

On Sat, 18 Feb 2012 14:27:30 -0500, (SAMMY DOG)
wrote:

please disabuse me if I am incorrect....recently I have been having a
miserable time in my efforts to adopt/find another animal or two to add
to my household....no need to go into a long story, but I have not had
any help from any rescues and this had turned me sour on them. I'll
eventually sort this out on my own as usual.
Events of recent months and especially the last day or so have caused me
to think more clearly about these groups as a whole and I have come to
the conslusion that in a state like New Jersey, where I live there are
more of them than are necessary.
Nobody loves animals more than I do, but the notion of true "rescue"
seems to have gotten almost as meaningless as "shelter".
What is importantant is the number of dogs that need homes and the
number of households that will take in a dog in any given year.
Rescues are aleays in dire need of money, Why ? Largely because they
don't make enough placements and thus don't get enough fees. Why is that
? Because they are in competition with other rescues to fill a
finite/set number of openings per year. If 200 rescues can pull a
sufficient number of dogs from shelters or the street to fill all of the
open places in households who would go to a shelter or rescue then 250
rescues just glut the market, like too many restaurants in an area.
More rescues do not create more adoptors or adoptions. There will always
be enough rescue operations in N.J. to suit the need to faciitate the
movement of dogs from kill shelter to new home. They will always get
enough funding to place as many dogs as can be placed. I was almost
certain that I was going to leave big money to a rescue group, now I see
it as a waste, just propping up one group without helping dogs in the
main at all. SD


Well, if New Jersey has enough rescue groups to save all the dogs that
need saving, then New Jersey and its inhabitants are lucky indeed.
That's certainly not the case in Ohio. And I don't believe that it's
the case in New Jersey, either.


  #3  
Old February 19th 12, 05:45 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
Jo Wolf
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 479
Default Sad fact about animal rescue groups

Good heavens! Shelters and rescue groups from NJ post dogs to breed and
type rescue groups all the time, indicating to me that there are far
from enough homes for all of the dogs on hand.

Each organization has it's own policies and procedures, to include
criteria for adoption. That leads me to think that perhaps you aren't
fitting their criteria in some way or another.

For instance, when I get a request for two purebred dogs of the breed I
work with, my little antennae extend and start wiggling.... Why would
this person, who usually hasn't even met a dog of this breed, want to
adopt two initially, instead of living with one for a while before
seeking a second dog?

Some are extremely reluctant to place a dog in a home that already has
multiple dogs... or do not currently have dogs that do well with other
dogs. If they deal primarily with toy size dogs and the requesting home
has one or more big dogs, that can put the kibosh on things.

Or when someone has a laundry list of requirements for a dog to be
adopted.... female, between age x and age y, with one blue eye and one
brown eye, rare curled tail, and obedience trained to the utility level,
loves toddlers, cats, guinea pigs and parrots, and is of an uncommon or
rare color.... with no behavior issues and just loves to have it's
nails trimmed.... no medical issues.... the inquirer isn't going to get
far in the application process.

Some will not place a dog outside a specific geographical area. I know
of one rescue organization in Los Angeles that only places dogs in a
rather small portion of the LA Basin.

Some purebred rescue groups do a police check on all applicants....

So look at yourself and figure out what about you is causing you to be
turned down.

Jo Wolf
Martinez, Georgia, USA

  #4  
Old February 19th 12, 04:21 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
SSS DDD
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Hey Jo et al

I never wrote that I was being turned down, the problem is an absence of
dogs I will consider. I never wrote that rescues are not desperate to
place dogs. I wrote that there are more rescues than are needed to
furnish dogs to whatever homes are available. The only additional dogs
the unnecessary rescues save are those they have in foster, which is a
low number. I have contacted many municipal shelters looking for one or
two dogs I can take that are in immediate danger of euthanization.
Result : no replies.
Knuckle headed responses such as these are why I have been nearly
totally turned off by contact with rescues. Sanctuaries are a different
matter, they save lives and the more the better. My focus in eventually
leaving big money for animals has shifted from rescues to sanctuaries,
but then there is the concern that the money will be misused by a small
operation and I am not prepared to bail out an operation that is going
under unless I am a part of it. Hard to believe, but true, there is not
a single sanctuary for senior/unadoptable dogs in N. J. SD

  #5  
Old February 19th 12, 06:15 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
Charles Richmond[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Sad fact about animal rescue groups

"sighthounds & siberians" wrote in message
...

[... disenchantment with the large number of rescue groups deleted
...]

Well, if New Jersey has enough rescue groups to save all the dogs that
need saving, then New Jersey and its inhabitants are lucky indeed.
That's certainly not the case in Ohio. And I don't believe that it's
the case in New Jersey, either.



I believe what the OP is saying... is that there is more than enough rescue
groups to adopt out the dogs that *can* be adopted out. This is far lower
than the number of dogs that need saving. So the excess groups help by
being a buffer and holding dogs temporarily. You can carry a ton of
canaries in a half-ton truck... if *half* of the canaries are flying at any
one time. :-)


--
++
| Charles Richmond |
++

  #6  
Old February 19th 12, 06:24 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
sighthounds & siberians
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,538
Default Hey Jo et al

On Sun, 19 Feb 2012 11:21:32 -0500, (SSS DDD) wrote:

I never wrote that I was being turned down, the problem is an absence of
dogs I will consider. I never wrote that rescues are not desperate to
place dogs. I wrote that there are more rescues than are needed to
furnish dogs to whatever homes are available.


And you are wrong.

The only additional dogs
the unnecessary rescues save are those they have in foster, which is a
low number.


What is your source for this information?

I have contacted many municipal shelters looking for one or
two dogs I can take that are in immediate danger of euthanization.
Result : no replies.


Many shelters work only with approved rescue groups that have
spay/neuter policies, screen potential adopters, etc. If the shelters
don't know you from Adam, why would you expect them to jump at your
offer?

Knuckle headed responses such as these are why I have been nearly
totally turned off by contact with rescues. Sanctuaries are a different
matter, they save lives and the more the better. My focus in eventually
leaving big money for animals has shifted from rescues to sanctuaries,
but then there is the concern that the money will be misused by a small
operation and I am not prepared to bail out an operation that is going
under unless I am a part of it. Hard to believe, but true, there is not
a single sanctuary for senior/unadoptable dogs in N. J. SD


I've got news for you. Rescue groups save lives. Sanctuaries do too,
but the number they can save is limited because they generally don't
place the dogs they take in.

It's hard to tell from your posts exactly what you've done to 'help',
but it's not hard to tell why rescues and shelters might have been
just as turned off by you as you were by them.
  #7  
Old February 20th 12, 12:32 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
The One
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Hey Jo et al

this reply is more knuckleheaded nonsence...support your claim that more
rescue groups would lead to more placements, does not make sense, even
the idea that more groups would help more than the dogs in foster is
laughable. Support my claim ? easy all rescue fosters are always full,
the reason : not enough adoptors, most rescues take the most adoptable
dogs. The idea that shelters are holding back dogs from adoptors ia also
laughable. All the shelters I've checked have only easily adotable dogs,
tough to place agressive breeds, or immediately put down sick dogs. My
local high kill shelter just kills the sick ones when they come in. I
just had the thought that I might try to intervene in that cruelty, but
I would probably run into " policy " and possibly have a tough time
finding a dog or two I could save, that is fit in with my circle.
As to what I have done, or could do, that isn't really the point at
hand. I was considering bailing out a local rescue, but as I've written
I believe that there are too many as is, I also came across a sanctuary
in another state that is gong under, a big pot of cash would save their
operation, but I need something in which I play a major part. I'm
possibly open to donating time and money now, but I may just leave it
when I go...if I find a set up that satisfies my concerns. SD

  #8  
Old February 20th 12, 10:45 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
Jo Wolf
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 479
Default Hey Jo et al

Hm. That wasn't the way I interprettted what you were trying to say.

Supporting a sanctuary is EXPENSIVE, as you've already discovered. It
also requires a lot of space and some isolation to prevent complaints
from neighbors. So reletively crowded, high cost of living states like
much of NJ aren't going to be prime prospects for a sanctuary that meets
state department of agriculture requirements for a shelter or a kennel.

Now.... dealing with Animal Care and Control shelters (by any name) that
fall under city or county governments is a bit different than dealing
with private rescues and shelters. They have policies and procedures
pertaining to adoptions, too. THey do have adoptable dogs. Most don't
get excited by phone calls and emails. They want to see your eyeballs.
Get yourself in there and look at dogs. OFTEN. They have adoptable
dogs. All of the adoptables do NOT go to rescues. I could walk into
the three county shelters nearest me in GA and SC and find one or more
dogs I'd like to adopt on any given day.

Jo Wolf
Martinez, Georgia, USA

  #9  
Old February 20th 12, 10:48 PM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
Jo Wolf
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 479
Default Hey Jo et al - Added

I have been operating a nationwide purebred rescue network for 20+ years
and deal with county shelters constantly. They turn to us when they
have an adoptable dog that hasn't been adopted by local folks or pulled
by a local shelter. Locals get first choice.

Jo Wolf
Martinez, Georgia, USA

  #10  
Old February 21st 12, 02:05 AM posted to rec.pets.dogs.rescue
SSS DDD
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Hey Jo et al - Added

I've read that the euthanasia rate in Southern states can run as high as
90%, the problem in NJ. is the pits, nice dogs if not badly treated, but
they dominate the shelter population, as high as 95% in Newark. I've
given up on thinking rescues are a good investment in time or
money...they compete with each other for placements and donations. I've
gone to shelters enough to see that they have pleanty of adoptable
dogs.... which are either adopted or rescued. The rest are pits or
rotties and they don't last long.
I was contacted today by a N.Y. shelter about a fourteen year old
Spaniel, told them I'll wait to see if she's adopted or rescued, I'm on
her list, but if things go the way I've outlined before I suspect she'll
be rescued/adopted.

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Animal Rights groups Lynne Dog behavior 3 March 30th 07 06:40 PM
FWD: NC dogfighters trying to adopt from rescue groups [email protected] Dog health 0 February 4th 06 07:29 PM
FWD: NC dogfighters trying to adopt from rescue groups [email protected] Dog rescue 0 February 4th 06 07:27 PM
Pasado's safe haven/ New Orleans rescue, HSUS stiffs rescue groups hsus_stinks Dogs - general 0 October 14th 05 01:46 AM
Grants for rescue groups? Richard Evans Dog rescue 1 July 15th 04 01:06 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.2.0 (Unregistered)
Copyright 2004-2019 DogBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.