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Spaying or Puppies



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 2nd 03, 11:52 PM
Eowyn
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Default Spaying or Puppies

Howdy all - I'm new to this newsgroup and have a question. I've
recently been adopted by a German Shepherd (she wandered into our yard
and stayed) She's getting big quick and I know the time for
spaying will be soon, although I may want to let her breed instead as
she appears to be purebred. However, we already have two other dogs -
both neutered males.

My questions a

1. Will having an unspayed female cause problems with the neutered
males?

2. If I do get her spayed, is it healthier to allow her to go into
season at least once first?

3. If I do get her spayed, is it healthier to allow her to have one
set of pups first? (We'd make sure they got good homes, of course -
maybe even keep them ourselves) I've heard that behaviorally, it is
better to let them have a litter before spaying.

Your input is much appreciated!

Eowyn
  #2  
Old July 3rd 03, 12:19 AM
Tara
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Eowyn wrote:
Howdy all - I'm new to this newsgroup and have a question. I've
recently been adopted by a German Shepherd (she wandered into our yard
and stayed) She's getting big quick and I know the time for
spaying will be soon, although I may want to let her breed instead as
she appears to be purebred. However, we already have two other dogs -
both neutered males.

My questions a

1. Will having an unspayed female cause problems with the neutered
males?


Quite possibly, yes.

2. If I do get her spayed, is it healthier to allow her to go into
season at least once first?


Not really. There aren't many definitive studies one way or the other,
so in the interest of health and peace in the household, I'd do it now.

Is she really *that* young? A 4 or 5 month old purebred GSD walked into
your yard? Are you absolutely certain that no one lost this puppy?

3. If I do get her spayed, is it healthier to allow her to have one
set of pups first?


Absolutely and unequivocally NO!!!

(We'd make sure they got good homes, of course -
maybe even keep them ourselves)


While this intention is nice and all, its simply impossible for you to
say this and guarantee it. The vast number of pets that are produced
(and most of those end up in shelters eventually) are produced by the "I
only want one litter" owner. And most of the time, they're even telling
the truth and spay the dog afterwards. But there is infinitely more to
responsibly breeding a dog than having a female with a working uterus.

I've heard that behaviorally, it is
better to let them have a litter before spaying.


Wow. This is SO not true. Who told you this? They're completely dead wrong.

Your input is much appreciated!


This is probably more input than you were bargaining for, but here goes:

GSDs are plentiful right now. So plentiful in fact that GSD rescue
groups across the country are constantly plucking Shepherds from kill
shelters in order to save them from euthanasia. If you breed your dog,
you will become what is known as a BYB (BackYard Breeder). This is *not*
a good thing among people who care about dogs and who care about breeds.

German Shepherds (among other breeds) have been nearly destroyed by
people who think AKC papers and intact reproductive systems are enough
of a reason to breed a dog. And now we have skittish temperaments,
biting problems, aggression issue, anxiety issues, hip problems, spinal
diseases, thyroid problems....etc etc etc.

If someone doesn't have a clear understanding of what goes into a breed,
why there are breed standards (and even why there might be different
standards for a breed depending on what type of working lines you're
dealing with), what constitutes sound structure (and how its
determined) and sound temperament (and how *that's* determined), then
that person really shouldn't be breeding.

The shelters are already filled with the aftermath of people's "just
this once" litters. It just takes a few years for the dogs to end up there.

Does anyone have to exact statistic? Isn't it something like 70% of all
dogs won't live out their lives in their first home? I do know that once
they've been rehomed once, their chances of staying in all subsequent
homes is *drastically* reduced. Proper screening of homes and knowing
which pup to appropriately place in which lifetime (or "forever") home
is hard enough....but it isn't the hardest part of breeding *responsibly*.

Please spay this puppy. And maybe see if someone lost her as well.

Tara

  #3  
Old July 3rd 03, 01:31 AM
Angela
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Default

although I may want to let her breed instead as
she appears to be purebred.


"Appears to be" is the key phrase there. Meaning, you have no papers showing
generations of champion lines and vet checks on her parents showing no
congenital or temperament problems. It means you could be creating puppies with
hip displaysia, bad eyes, heart murmers, genetic allergy woes, dwarfism, etc.

GSD's die in shelter here in Southern CA every day because there are not enough
rescue for them. Purebred dogs who became unwanted and are now paying the
ultimate price. Why? Because they were allowed to be born by a breeder who
didn't care enough to carefully screen the new buyers or to have a take back
policy that was enforced.

Have her spayed ASAP, before the first heat, not doing so increases her risk of
mammary cancer, not a pretty way for her to die! It will also prevent an
accidental mixed breed litter from a dog jumping your fence, or her managing to
get out. (Bitches in heat can get quite creative on managing to get bred, as
can dogs smelling a female in heat.)

Angela (Aol.com doesn't hop!)

A HREF="http://www.rabbitadoption.org" Rabbit & Small Animal Adoptions/A
HREF Rabbits & small animals for adoption--worldwide links, including vet
referrals & other rescues, care tips, mail order products, etc.
  #4  
Old July 3rd 03, 12:42 PM
House\O\Dogs
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Please spay her ASAP. If you have any doubts about how many GSDs need
homes, please take a minute to visit our web site www.shepherdrescue.org
Our rescue is just one of MANY that are dedicated to helping these unwanted,
but wonderful dogs find new homes.

Since you do not know any history or background on this pup, it would be
very unethical of you to breed her.

Our shepherd rescue gets in beautiful purebred puppies on a regular basis.

Thanks for getting more information. I do hope that you decide to do the
right thing.

All the best,

Lea S
Virginia German Shepherd Rescue


  #5  
Old July 4th 03, 12:57 AM
Eowyn
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Tara wrote in message ...
snip for length

Is she really *that* young? A 4 or 5 month old purebred GSD walked into
your yard? Are you absolutely certain that no one lost this puppy?


Yes, in fact, maybe younger - mom thinks 4 months max. We were sure
someone had "lost" a puppy and did try to locat the owner, but no
takers. Now we're pretty sure she was dumped. Our good fortune,
she's absolutely wonderful.

snip
German Shepherds (among other breeds) have been nearly destroyed by
people who think AKC papers and intact reproductive systems are enough
of a reason to breed a dog. And now we have skittish temperaments,
biting problems, aggression issue, anxiety issues, hip problems, spinal
diseases, thyroid problems....etc etc etc.

If someone doesn't have a clear understanding of what goes into a breed,
why there are breed standards (and even why there might be different
standards for a breed depending on what type of working lines you're
dealing with), what constitutes sound structure (and how its
determined) and sound temperament (and how *that's* determined), then
that person really shouldn't be breeding.

snip

I wouldn't fit into that group of people. Our dogs are always very
important to us and we take very good care of them. We understand
their idiosyncrasies and possible health issues and work very hard to
ensure they are happy and healthy. We've owned shepherds before and
do understand the breed, it's the breeding I was uncertain about -
it's been a long time since we did any of that. Used to have Shelties
& bred them, but don't anymore.



Please spay this puppy. And maybe see if someone lost her as well.

Tara



Have decided to spay thanks to the responses on this site. I do
intend to be one of the "good guys."

Deb
  #6  
Old July 4th 03, 12:58 AM
Eowyn
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Default

"House\"O\"Dogs" wrote in message ...
Please spay her ASAP. snip
Lea S
Virginia German Shepherd Rescue



I intend to. As soon as she's old enough. We think she's at most 4 months now.
 




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