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Bathing A Dog....



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 12th 03, 11:46 PM
hi fi
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Default Bathing A Dog....

Bathing a dog can be a messy experience, and in warm weather it's best done
outdoors. Have a tub, or other container, half filled with warm (not hot!)
water and keep plenty more ready for rinsing. Use a mild baby shampoo or dog
shampoo, or whatever your vet recommends. Always study the instructions
carefully beforehand and have an old clean towel ready. Depending on the
breed, you might also require a hair dryer.

When everything is ready, gently lift your dog (with someone else if
necessary) into the container of tepid water. Then use a clean bottle or jug
to pour the warm water over his body from the back of the neck downward,
leaving his head until last.

Start by applying the shampoo to the body and legs, then rub it well in to
give a good lather, making sure to cover his entire coat. His head should be
done last, taking particular care that no shampoo gets into his eyes. When
you're satisfied that he's thoroughly clean, rinse off the shampoo by
pouring warm water on to his coat. Quite a lot of water will be needed to
rinse it out completely.

Once out of the tub, your dog will probably shake himself vigorously,
removing most of the water from his coat in an instant. Use an old clean
towel to dry off the remainder and then complete the drying using the hair
dryer on a low temperature setting. By using a brush with the hair dryer,
you can speed up the drying process considerably.







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  #2  
Old July 13th 03, 01:31 PM
C A Brown
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Default

Believe me; I'm not trying to be difficult but ---
You must have a dog that is of smaller size. Large dog people probably do
not have a tub that would fit a dog of over 100 lbs. Then lifting would be
difficult and potentially dangerous to one's back.
But most importantly, how do you get the " quite a lot" of warm water that
will be required for rinsing out to the yard? I have wished I could do
Molly's baths outside but could never do her bath in cold water and the
garden hose says "not for use with hot water".
Otherwise --- good post.
Carol Ann

"hi fi" wrote in message
...
Bathing a dog can be a messy experience, and in warm weather it's best

done
outdoors. Have a tub, or other container, half filled with warm (not hot!)
water and keep plenty more ready for rinsing. Use a mild baby shampoo or

dog
shampoo, or whatever your vet recommends. Always study the instructions
carefully beforehand and have an old clean towel ready. Depending on the
breed, you might also require a hair dryer.

When everything is ready, gently lift your dog (with someone else if
necessary) into the container of tepid water. Then use a clean bottle or

jug
to pour the warm water over his body from the back of the neck downward,
leaving his head until last.

Start by applying the shampoo to the body and legs, then rub it well in to
give a good lather, making sure to cover his entire coat. His head should

be
done last, taking particular care that no shampoo gets into his eyes. When
you're satisfied that he's thoroughly clean, rinse off the shampoo by
pouring warm water on to his coat. Quite a lot of water will be needed to
rinse it out completely.

Once out of the tub, your dog will probably shake himself vigorously,
removing most of the water from his coat in an instant. Use an old clean
towel to dry off the remainder and then complete the drying using the hair
dryer on a low temperature setting. By using a brush with the hair dryer,
you can speed up the drying process considerably.







---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.500 / Virus Database: 298 - Release Date: 07/10/2003





  #3  
Old July 13th 03, 07:27 PM
Sue and Atty
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"DaveL" wrote in message
...
C A Brown wrote:

But most importantly, how do you get the " quite a lot" of warm water

that
will be required for rinsing out to the yard? I have wished I could do
Molly's baths outside but could never do her bath in cold water and the
garden hose says "not for use with hot water".


A garden hose will work just fine with warm or even hot water. Just
feed the hose into the house to where you can hook up to a threaded
faucet - typically laundry tubs.


We had running hot and cold faucets in the garage where I grew up. I just
figured all garage faucets were like that until I started looking into
buying my own house. Sure made the car washing experience nicer without
that frigid cold water - never had a dog to wash growing up

I did have a giggle at the original post - HiFi forgot one little part....
after the dog shakes himself off, he'll probably zoom all over the yard and
roll in the dirt before you can grab the towel and towel dry him off! At
least, that's our favorite part of bath time here - which is why I try to do
it in the bathtub in the bathroom where I close the shower curtain and tell
Atty to shake the water off. Never fails, she still gets it all over the
bathroom with additional shaking. Thank goodness for tiled walls and
linolium floors!

Sue and Atty


  #4  
Old July 13th 03, 09:50 PM
C A Brown
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Posts: n/a
Default

Sue: I hadn't even thought it through that far but come to think of it,
Molly isn't allowed out in the yard without a leash until she is fully dry
for that very reason. And we keep the bathroom door shut until after she
finishes shaking.
Carol Ann


I did have a giggle at the original post - HiFi forgot one little part....
after the dog shakes himself off, he'll probably zoom all over the yard

and
roll in the dirt before you can grab the towel and towel dry him off! At
least, that's our favorite part of bath time here - which is why I try to

do
it in the bathtub in the bathroom where I close the shower curtain and

tell
Atty to shake the water off. Never fails, she still gets it all over the
bathroom with additional shaking. Thank goodness for tiled walls and
linolium floors!

Sue and Atty




 




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