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heat exhaustion vs. normal panting?



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 28th 03, 10:58 PM
Marie Castellano
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Posts: n/a
Default heat exhaustion vs. normal panting?

Dave,

I once asked my vet if I needed to take my lab inside because he likes to
sit in the sun too long. She said that I did need to do so because the dogs
really don't know when they've had enough. I would think that would apply
in your case also.
Marie


"Dave Austin" wrote in message
om...
Was wondering if any dog experts might be able to offer some advice on
how to tell if a dog is "overheating" as opposed to normal, everyday
panting - are there any noticeable, physical symptoms? We live in
Austin, Tx, and the summers are quite hot, but my black Lab LOVES to
be outside with me when I hike or jog. I always have water for her,
and we rest often, but sometimes I notice she starts to lag behind
after a while...am I pushing her too hard? I can't really tell by her
panting - this dog will pant loudly in an ice-cold room while napping
in front of the TV. She's not overweight in the least - she gets
plenty of walks and exercise. I just want to make sure I'm not
putting her in any kind of potential heat-related danger. Any advice
is appreciated! Thanks,

Dave



  #2  
Old July 28th 03, 10:58 PM
Marie Castellano
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Dave,

I once asked my vet if I needed to take my lab inside because he likes to
sit in the sun too long. She said that I did need to do so because the dogs
really don't know when they've had enough. I would think that would apply
in your case also.
Marie


"Dave Austin" wrote in message
om...
Was wondering if any dog experts might be able to offer some advice on
how to tell if a dog is "overheating" as opposed to normal, everyday
panting - are there any noticeable, physical symptoms? We live in
Austin, Tx, and the summers are quite hot, but my black Lab LOVES to
be outside with me when I hike or jog. I always have water for her,
and we rest often, but sometimes I notice she starts to lag behind
after a while...am I pushing her too hard? I can't really tell by her
panting - this dog will pant loudly in an ice-cold room while napping
in front of the TV. She's not overweight in the least - she gets
plenty of walks and exercise. I just want to make sure I'm not
putting her in any kind of potential heat-related danger. Any advice
is appreciated! Thanks,

Dave



  #3  
Old July 29th 03, 01:52 AM
ZPL
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Posts: n/a
Default

But they do get heat stroke - inability to cool down.

"buglady" wrote in message
thlink.net...

"Dave Austin" wrote in message
om...
are there any noticeable, physical symptoms? We live in
Austin, Tx, and the summers are quite hot, but my black Lab LOVES to
be outside with me when I hike or jog. I always have water for her,
and we rest often, but sometimes I notice she starts to lag behind
after a while...am I pushing her too hard


.......I think a lot of dogs really don't know when to stop. I would say
absolutely NO to the jogging in the summer heat, unless you're out before
the sun comes up. At least in Austin you don't have high humidities too!
After a while they can't take in enough water to cool themselves. If
there's a stream or a pool of water they can get into and soak, then lay

in
the shade, it's not as bad, but just drinking water won't cool them off
enough on long hikes in the sun. I'd restrict her to 15 minute bouts of
rowdiness throughout the day and walks on a leash in the daytime. It's
boring compared to hikes/jogs, but much safer and won't last forever.

One
of the links at the about.com site below is an article by a vet who says

he
sees heatstroke more often in spring and fall than summer. One of my dogs
has gotten very overheated several times when she's on the trail of some
animal and won't stop. By the time she gets back to me 20 minutes later

she
looks way too hot. This has occured when the air temp and humidity was
really less than it is now in the shank of summer. Now she seems to know
not to run around like a maniac and stops in the shade to lay down. We
spend a lot of the walk in the waterhole!

Signs of heatstroke (from The Dog Care Book, Sheldon Gerstenfeld, DVM):
In heatstroke, the body is completely unable to lower its fever. All the
mechanisms normally used to regulate body temperature, such as panting,

are
ineffectual.
rectal temperature of over 106 F, extreme panting, a fast-pounding pulse,
weakness, a staring expression, and collapse.

Here's some first aid for dogs sites, including CPR
http://www.dog.com/vet/firstaid/03.html
http://www.ccc.govt.nz/animals/DogFirstAid.asp
http://members.aol.com/henryhbk/acpr.html
Some excellent links at about.com:
http://vetmedicine.about.com/cs/summerinfo/

Even Click and Clack the Tappet brothers have something to say about heat
stroke:
http://cartalk.cars.com/info/fido/dog-sick.html

BTW, I don't think dogs get heat exhaustion. I think heat exhaustion is

dut
to loss of too much fluid via sweat and is a human thing.

buglady
take out the dog before replying




  #4  
Old July 29th 03, 01:52 AM
ZPL
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

But they do get heat stroke - inability to cool down.

"buglady" wrote in message
thlink.net...

"Dave Austin" wrote in message
om...
are there any noticeable, physical symptoms? We live in
Austin, Tx, and the summers are quite hot, but my black Lab LOVES to
be outside with me when I hike or jog. I always have water for her,
and we rest often, but sometimes I notice she starts to lag behind
after a while...am I pushing her too hard


.......I think a lot of dogs really don't know when to stop. I would say
absolutely NO to the jogging in the summer heat, unless you're out before
the sun comes up. At least in Austin you don't have high humidities too!
After a while they can't take in enough water to cool themselves. If
there's a stream or a pool of water they can get into and soak, then lay

in
the shade, it's not as bad, but just drinking water won't cool them off
enough on long hikes in the sun. I'd restrict her to 15 minute bouts of
rowdiness throughout the day and walks on a leash in the daytime. It's
boring compared to hikes/jogs, but much safer and won't last forever.

One
of the links at the about.com site below is an article by a vet who says

he
sees heatstroke more often in spring and fall than summer. One of my dogs
has gotten very overheated several times when she's on the trail of some
animal and won't stop. By the time she gets back to me 20 minutes later

she
looks way too hot. This has occured when the air temp and humidity was
really less than it is now in the shank of summer. Now she seems to know
not to run around like a maniac and stops in the shade to lay down. We
spend a lot of the walk in the waterhole!

Signs of heatstroke (from The Dog Care Book, Sheldon Gerstenfeld, DVM):
In heatstroke, the body is completely unable to lower its fever. All the
mechanisms normally used to regulate body temperature, such as panting,

are
ineffectual.
rectal temperature of over 106 F, extreme panting, a fast-pounding pulse,
weakness, a staring expression, and collapse.

Here's some first aid for dogs sites, including CPR
http://www.dog.com/vet/firstaid/03.html
http://www.ccc.govt.nz/animals/DogFirstAid.asp
http://members.aol.com/henryhbk/acpr.html
Some excellent links at about.com:
http://vetmedicine.about.com/cs/summerinfo/

Even Click and Clack the Tappet brothers have something to say about heat
stroke:
http://cartalk.cars.com/info/fido/dog-sick.html

BTW, I don't think dogs get heat exhaustion. I think heat exhaustion is

dut
to loss of too much fluid via sweat and is a human thing.

buglady
take out the dog before replying




  #5  
Old July 29th 03, 03:02 AM
crosem
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I live in Austin, too, and my doggie (English cocker spaniel) does not do
well in the heat...once it even brought on a grand mal seizure. So, I am
quite careful...we walk early or very late. He does not come in the car
with me when it's over 80, no matter how many open windows or shady
locations or short stays I may take part in, etc.

"Dave Austin" wrote in message
om...
| Was wondering if any dog experts might be able to offer some advice on
| how to tell if a dog is "overheating" as opposed to normal, everyday
| panting - are there any noticeable, physical symptoms? We live in
| Austin, Tx, and the summers are quite hot, but my black Lab LOVES to
| be outside with me when I hike or jog. I always have water for her,
| and we rest often, but sometimes I notice she starts to lag behind
| after a while...am I pushing her too hard? I can't really tell by her
| panting - this dog will pant loudly in an ice-cold room while napping
| in front of the TV. She's not overweight in the least - she gets
| plenty of walks and exercise. I just want to make sure I'm not
| putting her in any kind of potential heat-related danger. Any advice
| is appreciated! Thanks,
|
| Dave


  #6  
Old July 29th 03, 03:02 AM
crosem
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I live in Austin, too, and my doggie (English cocker spaniel) does not do
well in the heat...once it even brought on a grand mal seizure. So, I am
quite careful...we walk early or very late. He does not come in the car
with me when it's over 80, no matter how many open windows or shady
locations or short stays I may take part in, etc.

"Dave Austin" wrote in message
om...
| Was wondering if any dog experts might be able to offer some advice on
| how to tell if a dog is "overheating" as opposed to normal, everyday
| panting - are there any noticeable, physical symptoms? We live in
| Austin, Tx, and the summers are quite hot, but my black Lab LOVES to
| be outside with me when I hike or jog. I always have water for her,
| and we rest often, but sometimes I notice she starts to lag behind
| after a while...am I pushing her too hard? I can't really tell by her
| panting - this dog will pant loudly in an ice-cold room while napping
| in front of the TV. She's not overweight in the least - she gets
| plenty of walks and exercise. I just want to make sure I'm not
| putting her in any kind of potential heat-related danger. Any advice
| is appreciated! Thanks,
|
| Dave


  #7  
Old August 1st 03, 06:09 AM
Jo Wolf
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Q, that's a really interesting observation! Gotta remember that one, to
see if it holds true across the board, if nothing else.

But dogs don't get heat exhaustion, just heat stroke.....

Jo Wolf
Martinez, Georgia

  #8  
Old August 1st 03, 06:09 AM
Jo Wolf
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Q, that's a really interesting observation! Gotta remember that one, to
see if it holds true across the board, if nothing else.

But dogs don't get heat exhaustion, just heat stroke.....

Jo Wolf
Martinez, Georgia

  #9  
Old August 4th 03, 06:36 AM
limenate
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Jo Wolf" wrote in message
...
Q, that's a really interesting observation! Gotta remember that one, to
see if it holds true across the board, if nothing else.

thanks


  #10  
Old August 4th 03, 06:36 AM
limenate
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Jo Wolf" wrote in message
...
Q, that's a really interesting observation! Gotta remember that one, to
see if it holds true across the board, if nothing else.

thanks


 




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